Fujiwara no Korechika

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Fujiwara no Korechika(藤原 伊周, 974 – February 14, 1010), the second son of Michitaka, was a kugyo (Japanese noble) of the Heian period. His mother was Takashina no Takako, also known as Kō-no-Naishi (高内侍). His sister Teishi (Sadako) was married to Emperor Ichijō, and Korechika aspired to become the regent ( Sessho ) for his young brother-in-law after his father's death. Korechika's (ultimately fruitless) ambitions pitted him against his powerful uncle, Fujiwara no Michinaga, and the resulting power struggle continued until Empress Teishi's unexpected death. This left Michinaga's daughter, Shoshi, as Ichijō's sole empress, solidifying Michinaga's power at court.

Fujiwara no Michitaka, the first son of Kaneie, was a Kugyō of the Heian period. He served as regent (Sesshō) for the Emperor Ichijō, and later as Kampaku. Ichijō married Michitaka's daughter Teishi (Sadako), thus continuing the close ties between the Imperial family and the Fujiwara.

Japan Constitutional monarchy in East Asia

Japan is an island country in East Asia. Located in the Pacific Ocean, it lies off the eastern coast of the Asian continent and stretches from the Sea of Okhotsk in the north to the East China Sea and the Philippine Sea in the south.

Nobility privileged social class

Nobility is a social class normally ranked immediately under royalty and found in some societies that have a formal aristocracy. Nobility possesses more acknowledged privileges and higher social status than most other classes in society. The privileges associated with nobility may constitute substantial advantages over or relative to non-nobles, or may be largely honorary, and vary by country and era. As referred to in the Medieval chivalric motto "noblesse oblige", nobles can also carry a lifelong duty to uphold various social responsibilities, such as honorable behavior, customary service, or leadership positions. Membership in the nobility, including rights and responsibilities, is typically hereditary.

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In Chōtoku 2 (長徳2年) (996), Korechika and his younger brother Takaie were exiled to Dazaifu. Korechika was charged with shooting an arrow at Retired Emperor Kazan, and performing an esoteric Shingon ceremony known as Taigen no Hō (大元帥法), which was reserved solely for the emperor. He was pardoned a year later, and subsequently became Jun-Daijin (associate minister; 准大臣).

Dazaifu, Fukuoka City in Kyushu, Japan

Dazaifu is a city located in Fukuoka Prefecture, Japan, part of the greater Fukuoka metropolitan area. Nearby cities include Ōnojō and Chikushino. Although mostly mountainous, it does have arable land used for paddy fields and market gardening.

Korechika is sometimes referred to as Gidō-sanshi (儀同三司) or Sochi no Naidaijin (帥内大臣).

Career

Shōryaku Japanese era spanning from November 990 to February 995

Shōryaku (正暦) was a Japanese era name after Eiso and before Chōtoku. This period spanned the years from November 990 through February 995. The reigning emperor was Ichijō-tennō (一条天皇).

Chūnagon counselor of the second rank in the Imperial court of Japan

Chūnagon (中納言) was a counselor of the second rank in the Imperial court of Japan. The role dates from the 7th century.

Dainagon an advisory position in the Imperial court of Japan

Dainagon (大納言) was a counselor of the first rank in the Imperial court of Japan. The role dates from the 7th century.

Marriages and children

He was married to a daughter of Gon-no-Dainagon Minamoto no Shigemitsu (源重光の娘).

They had three children.

Fujiwara no Michimasa Japanese court noble and poet

Fujiwara no Michimasa was a mid-Heian period Imperial court noble and poet. He is included in the Hyakunin Isshu and was the nephew of Emperor Ichijo's wife, Empress Fujiwara no Teishi.

Fujiwara no Michinaga Japanese nobleman of the Heian period

Fujiwara no Michinaga was a Japanese statesman. His rule represents the high point of the Fujiwara clan control over the government of Japan.

Emperor Ichijō Emperor of Japan

Emperor Ichijō was the 66th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession.

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Fujiwara no Kaneie Japanese noble

Fujiwara no Kaneie was a Japanese statesman, courtier and politician during the Heian period.

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Fujiwara no Takaie

Fujiwara no Takaie, was a Kugyō of the late Heian period. He was the Regional Governor of Dazaifu and is famous for repelling the Jurchen pirates during the Toi invasion in 1019. He reached the court position of Chūnagon.

Empress Shōshi daughter of Michinaga; empress consort of Ichijō

Fujiwara no Shōshi, also known as Jōtōmon-in (上東門院), the eldest daughter of Fujiwara no Michinaga, was Empress of Japan from c. 1000 to c. 1011. Her father sent her to live in the Emperor Ichijō's harem at age 12. Because of his power, influence and political machinations she quickly achieved the status of second empress. As empress she was able to surround herself with a court of talented and educated ladies-in-waiting such as Murasaki Shikibu, author of The Tale of Genji.

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Fujiwara no Atsunobu was a Japanese nobleman and writer of both waka and kanshi poetry.

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