Fujiwara no Michitaka

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Fujiwara no Michitaka(藤原 道隆, 953 – May 16, 995), the first son of Kaneie, was a Kugyō (Japanese noble) of the Heian period. He served as regent ( Sesshō ) for the Emperor Ichijō, and later as Kampaku . Ichijō married Michitaka's daughter Teishi (Sadako), thus continuing the close ties between the Imperial family and the Fujiwara.

Fujiwara no Kaneie Japanese noble

Fujiwara no Kaneie was a Japanese statesman, courtier and politician during the Heian period.

<i>Kugyō</i> person attached to the court of the Emperor of Japan in pre-Meiji eras

Kugyō (公卿) is the collective term for the very few most powerful men attached to the court of the Emperor of Japan in pre-Meiji eras. The kugyō was broadly divided into two groups: the (公), comprising the Chancellor of the Realm, the Minister of the Left, and the Minister of the Right; and the Kei (卿), comprising the Major Counsellor, the Middle Counsellor, the Court Councillor, and members of the Japanese court of the third rank or higher.

Japan Constitutional monarchy in East Asia

Japan is an island country in East Asia. Located in the Pacific Ocean, it lies off the eastern coast of the Asian continent and stretches from the Sea of Okhotsk in the north to the East China Sea and the Philippine Sea in the south.

Contents

Michitaka is sometimes referred to as Nijō Kampaku (二条関白) or Naka-no-Kampaku (中関白).

Career

Kanna (寛和) was a Japanese era name after Eikan and before Eien. This period spanned the years from April 985 through April 987. The reigning emperors were En'yu-tennō (円融天皇) and Ichijō-tennō (一条天皇).

Chūnagon counselor of the second rank in the Imperial court of Japan

Chūnagon (中納言) was a counselor of the second rank in the Imperial court of Japan. The role dates from the 7th century.

Dainagon an advisory position in the Imperial court of Japan

Dainagon (大納言) was a counselor of the first rank in the Imperial court of Japan. The role dates from the 7th century.

Family

Takashina no Takako Japanese waka poet


Takashina no Takako, also known as the mother of the Honorary Grand Minister or as Kō no Naishi (高内侍), was a Japanese waka poet of the mid-Heian period. One of her poems was included in the Ogura Hyakunin Isshu.

Fujiwara no Korechika kugyo

Fujiwara no Korechika, the second son of Michitaka, was a kugyo of the Heian period. His mother was Takashina no Takako, also known as Kō-no-Naishi (高内侍). His sister Teishi (Sadako) was married to Emperor Ichijō, and Korechika aspired to become the regent (Sessho) for his young brother-in-law after his father's death. Korechika's ambitions pitted him against his powerful uncle, Fujiwara no Michinaga, and the resulting power struggle continued until Empress Teishi's unexpected death. This left Michinaga's daughter, Shoshi, as Ichijō's sole empress, solidifying Michinaga's power at court.

Fujiwara no Teishi was an empress consort of the Japanese Emperor Ichijō. She appears in the literary classic The Pillow Book written by her court lady Sei Shōnagon.

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Fujiwara no Norimichi, fifth son of Michinaga, was a kugyo of the Heian period. His mother was Minamoto no Rinshi, daughter of Minamoto no Masanobu. Regent Yorimichi, Empress Shōshi, Empress Kenshi were his brother and sisters from the same mother. In 1068, the year when his daughter married Emperor Go-Reizei, he took the position of Kampaku, regent. He, however, lost the power when Emperor Go-Sanjo, who was not a relative of the Fujiwara clan, assumed the throne. This contributed to the later decline of the Fujiwara clan.

Fujiwara no Michimasa Japanese court noble and poet

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