Fujiwara no Tadamichi

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Fujiwara no Tadamichi(藤原 忠通, March 15, 1097 – March 13, 1164) was the eldest son of the Japanese regent ( Kampaku ) Fujiwara no Tadazane and a member of the politically powerful Fujiwara clan. [1] He was the father of Fujiwara no Kanefusa and Jien.

A regent is a person appointed to govern a state because the monarch is a minor, is absent or is incapacitated. The rule of a regent or regents is called a regency. A regent or regency council may be formed ad hoc or in accordance with a constitutional rule. "Regent" is sometimes a formal title. If the regent is holding his position due to his position in the line of succession, the compound term prince regent is often used; if the regent of a minor is his mother, she is often referred to as "queen regent".

Fujiwara no Tadazane was a Japanese noble, the son of Fujiwara no Moromichi and the grandson of Fujiwara no Morozane. He built a villa, Fukedono, north of the Byōdō-in Temple in 1114. He was the father of Fujiwara no Tadamichi.

Fujiwara clan powerful family of regents in Japan

Fujiwara clan, descending from the Nakatomi clan and through them Ame-no-Koyane-no-Mikoto, was a powerful family of regents in Japan.

In the Hōgen Rebellion of 1156, Tadamichi sided with the Emperor Go-Shirakawa, while his brother Fujiwara no Yorinaga sided with Emperor Sutoku. [1]

Emperor Go-Shirakawa Emperor of Japan

Emperor Go-Shirakawa was the 77th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. His reign spanned the years from 1155 through 1158, while he remained effectively in power for almost 37 years.

Fujiwara no Yorinaga Japanese noble

Fujiwara no Yorinaga, of the Fujiwara clan, held the position of Imperial Palace Minister of the Right.

Emperor Sutoku Emperor of Japan

Emperor Sutoku was the 75th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession.

Marriage and Children

Fujiwara no Kiyoko (1122–1182) was an Empress consort of Japan. She was the consort of Emperor Sutoku of Japan.

Konoe Motozane Kugyō and kampaku

Konoe Motozane, son of Fujiwara no Tadamichi, was a Kugyō during the late Heian period. His sons include Motomichi and wives include a daughter of Fujiwara no Tadataka, later they divorce and later he married Taira no Moriko, second daughter of Taira no Kiyomori. At age of 16 he assumed the position of kampaku, regent, to Emperor Nijō, becoming a head of Fujiwara family. He died at the age of 24 and his wife, Taira no Moriko become a widow at the age of 12. A year after he took the position of sesshō, or regent, to Emperor Rokujō. His ancestry later came to be known as Konoe family, one of the Five sessho families.

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References

  1. 1 2 Sansom, George (1958). A history of Japan to 1334. Stanford University Press. p. 210. ISBN   0804705232.