Fuling Mausoleum

Last updated

Coordinates: 41°49′34″N123°34′49″E / 41.82611°N 123.58028°E / 41.82611; 123.58028

Contents

Fuling Tomb Shenyang Dongling.jpg
Fuling Tomb

The Fuling or Fu Mausoleum (Chinese : ; pinyin : líng ; lit. 'Mausoleum of Happiness'; Manchu :ᡥᡡᡨᡠᡵᡳᠩᡤᠠ
ᠮᡠᠩᡤᠠᠨ
; Möllendorff : hūturingga munggan), also known as the East Mausoleum (simplified Chinese : ; traditional Chinese : ; pinyin : Dōng líng ), is the mausoleum of Nurhaci, the founding monarch of the Later Jin dynasty (subsequently posthumously recognized as an emperor of the Qing dynasty) and his wife, Empress Xiaocigao. It served as the main site for ritual ceremonies conducted by the imperial family during the entire Qing dynasty. [1] Located in the eastern part of Shenyang city, Liaoning Province, northeastern China, Fuling has been a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 2004.

Layout

The mausoleum is an extensive architectural complex that consist of stone archway, main red gate, sacred way, cloud pillars, stone animals, a 108-step stone staircase, the Shengong Shengde Stele Pavilion, the washing room, the fruit room, the tea room, the waiting room, Long'en Gate, Long'en Hall, eastern and western side-halls, silk burning pavilion, Lingxing Gate, the five stone sacrifice utensils, Ming pavilion, and Treasure City. [1]

Location

The mausoleum is located in a hilly area 10,000 meters east of the old city of Shenyang.

Protection

Fuling was inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in an extension to the site Imperial Tombs of the Ming and Qing Dynasties in 2004. [1]

Related Research Articles

Forbidden City Art museum, Imperial Palace, Historic site in Beijing, China

The Forbidden City is a palace complex in Dongcheng District, Beijing, China, at the center of the Imperial City of Beijing. It is surrounded by numerous opulent imperial gardens and temples including the 54-acre Zhongshan Park, the sacrificial Imperial Ancestral Temple, the 171-acre Beihai Park and the 57-acre Jingshan Park.

Ming tombs

The Ming tombs are a collection of mausoleums built by the emperors of the Ming dynasty of China. The first Ming emperor's tomb is located near his capital Nanjing. However, the majority of the Ming tombs are located in a cluster near Beijing and collectively known as the Thirteen Tombs of the Ming Dynasty. They are located within the suburban Changping District of Beijing Municipality, 42 kilometers (26 mi) north-northwest of Beijing's city center. The site, on the southern slope of Tianshou Mountain, was chosen based on the principles of feng shui by the third Ming emperor, the Yongle Emperor. After the construction of the Imperial Palace in 1420, the Yongle Emperor selected his burial site and created his own mausoleum. The subsequent emperors placed their tombs in the same valley.

Purple Mountain (Nanjing) mountain in Nanjing, Jiangsu, China

Purple Mountain or Zijin Shan is located on the eastern side of Nanjing in Jiangsu province, China. It is 448.2 m (1467 ft) high. Its peaks are often found enveloped in purple and golden clouds at dawn and dusk, hence its name.

Ming Xiaoling

The Ming Xiaoling is the mausoleum of the Hongwu Emperor, the founder of the Ming dynasty. It lies at the southern foot of Purple Mountain, located east of the historical centre of Nanjing. Legend says that in order to prevent robbery of the tomb, 13 identical processions of funeral troops started from 13 city gates to obscure the real burying site.

Mukden Palace Art museum, Imperial Palace, Historic site in Shenyang, Liaoning

The Mukden Palace, or Shenyang Imperial Palace, was the former imperial palace of the early Manchu-led Qing dynasty. It was built in 1625, and the first three Qing emperors lived there from 1625 to 1644. Since the collapse of imperial rule in China, the palace has been converted to a museum that now lies in the center of Shenyang, Liaoning.

Imperial Tombs of the Ming and Qing Dynasties is the designation under which the UNESCO has included several tombs and burial complexes into the list of World Heritage Sites (WHS). These tombs date from the Ming and Qing dynasties of China.

Gate of China, Beijing

The Gate of China was a historical ceremonial gateway in Beijing, China, located near the center of latter-day Tiananmen Square. It was demolished in 1954. This gate formed the southern gate of the Imperial City during the Ming and Qing dynasties. It was situated on the central axis of Beijing, to the north of Zhengyang Gate, and south of Tiananmen. Unlike these two defensive gates, the Gate of China was a purely ceremonial gateway, with no ramparts, but was a brick-stone structure with three gateways.

Zhao Mausoleum (Qing dynasty)

Zhaoling, also known as Beiling is the tomb of the second Qing emperor, Hong Taiji, and his empress Xiaoduanwen.

The Forbidden City was first built in the early-15th century as the palace of the Ming emperors of China. It is located in the centre of Beijing, China, and was the Chinese imperial palace from the early-Ming dynasty in 1420 to the end of the Qing dynasty in 1912, continuing to be home of the last emperor Puyi until 1924, since when it has been a museum.

Western Qing tombs

The Western Qing tombs are located some 140 km (87 mi) southwest of Beijing in Yi County, Hebei Province. They constitute a necropolis that incorporates four royal mausoleums where seventy-eight royal members are buried. These include four emperors of the Qing dynasty and their empresses, imperial concubines, princes and princesses, as well as other royal servants.

Hunnan District District in Liaoning, Peoples Republic of China

Hunnan District, formerly Dongling District one of ten districts of the prefecture-level city of Shenyang, the capital of Liaoning Province, Northeast China, and forms part of the eastern and southeastern suburbs. The district contains 12 subdistricts of Shenyang proper, six towns, one rural township, and one ethnic rural township. It borders Shenbei New Area to the north, Sujiatun to the south, Heping to the west, and Shenhe and Dadong to the northwest; it also borders the prefecture-level city of Fushun to the east.

Eastern Qing tombs Imperial mausoleum complex of the Qing dynasty

The Eastern Qing tombs are an imperial mausoleum complex of the Qing dynasty located in Zunhua, 125 kilometres (78 mi) northeast of Beijing. They are the largest, most complete, and best preserved extant mausoleum complex in China. Altogether, five emperors, 15 empresses, 136 imperial concubines, three princes, and two princesses of the Qing dynasty are buried here. Surrounded by Changrui Mountain, Jinxing Mountain, Huanghua Mountain, and Yingfei Daoyang Mountain, the tomb complex stretches over a total area of 80 square kilometres (31 sq mi).

Mausoleum of the Yellow Emperor

The Mausoleum of the Yellow Emperor is the burial site of the legendary Yellow Emperor (Huangdi) of China. It is located in Huangling County, Yan'an City, Shaanxi Province, China. According to legend, the Yellow Emperor attained immortality and rose to Heaven, leaving behind only his clothing and cap to be entombed.

Fengyang County County in Anhui, Peoples Republic of China

Fengyang County is a county in north-central Anhui Province, China. It is under the administration of Chuzhou, a prefecture-level city. The county was home to 765,600 people as of 2013.

Temple of Confucius, Qufu

The Temple of Confucius in Qufu, Shandong Province, is the largest and most renowned temple of Confucius in East Asia.

Que (tower)

The que is a freestanding, ceremonial gate tower in traditional Chinese architecture. First developed in the Zhou Dynasty, que towers were used to form ceremonial gateways to tombs, palaces and temples throughout pre-modern China down to the Qing Dynasty (1644-1912). The use of que gateways reached its peak during the Han Dynasty, and today they can often be seen as a component of an architectural ensemble at the graves of high officials during China's Han Dynasty. There are also some que found in front of temples. Richly decorated, they are among the most valuable surviving relics of the sculpture and architecture of that period.

Ming Ancestors Mausoleum

The Ming Ancestors Mausoleum is the first imperial mausoleum complex of the Ming dynasty, and a cenotaph located north of the former Sizhou City, Yangjiadun, in present-day Xuyi County, Huaian City, by Hongze Lake, north of Huai River Jiangsu Province, China. It was built by Zhu Yuanzhang, the founding emperor of the Ming dynasty, in 1385, for his great-great-grandfather, great-grandfather and grandfather. It is also the actual burial site of Zhu Chuyi, Zhu Yuanzhang's grandfather.

Dingling (Ming)

The Dingling is a mausoleum in China where the Wanli emperor, together with his two empresses Wang Xijie and Dowager Xiaojing, was buried. Dingling is one of the thirteen imperial tombs at Ming tombs in Changping district 45 km north of central Beijing. The Dingling is the only tomb of a Ming dynasty emperor that has been opened.

References