Gabriel Piroird

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Gabriel Piroird, Institute of Prado
Bishop of the Diocese of Constantine
Piroird.JPG
Church Roman Catholic Church
See Roman Catholic Diocese of Constantine
Appointed25 March 1983
In office1983 – 2008
Predecessor Jean Scotto
Successor Paul Desfarges
Orders
OrdinationJune 27, 1964
ConsecrationJune 3, 1983
by  Jean Scotto
Personal details
Birth nameGabriel Jules Joseph Piroird
Born(1932-10-05)October 5, 1932
Lyons, France
DiedApril 3, 2019(2019-04-03) (aged 86)
Écully, France

Gabriel Jules Joseph Piroird, Institute of Prado (5 October 1932 – 3 April 2019) was a French Roman Catholic prelate who served as the fourteenth Diocesan Bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Constantine from 25 March 1983 until his retirement on 21 November 2008.

Prelate high-ranking member of the clergy

A prelate is a high-ranking member of the clergy who is an ordinary or who ranks in precedence with ordinaries. The word derives from the Latin prælatus, the past participle of præferre, which means "carry before", "be set above or over" or "prefer"; hence, a prelate is one set over others.

Roman Catholic Diocese of Constantine diocese of the Catholic Church

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Constantine is a Roman Catholic diocese in the Ecclesiastical province of Algiers in Algeria.

Contents

Biography

Bishop Piroird was born in the Southern France and as a young person joined a secular institute of the Institute of the Priests of Prado, founded by Blessed Antoine Chevrier, where he was ordained a priest on June 27, 1964, [1] after completed his philosophical and theological education.

In the Roman Catholic Church, a secular institute is an organization of individuals who are consecrated persons and live in the world, unlike members of a religious institute, who live in community. It is one of the forms of consecrated life recognized in Church law.

Canon 710
A secular institute is an institute of consecrated life in which the Christian faithful living in the world strive for the perfection of charity and work for the sanctification of the world especially from within.

Antoine Chevrier French presbyter

Blessed Antoine Chevrier was a French Roman Catholic priest and a member of the Third Order of Saint Francis. He was the founder of the Sisters of Prado and the Institute of the Priests of Prado. His entire life and pastoral mission was devoted to the service of the poor and the education of poor children and those on the peripheries.

Priest person authorized to lead the sacred rituals of a religion (for a minister use Q1423891)

A priest or priestess is a religious leader authorized to perform the sacred rituals of a religion, especially as a mediatory agent between humans and one or more deities. They also have the authority or power to administer religious rites; in particular, rites of sacrifice to, and propitiation of, a deity or deities. Their office or position is the priesthood, a term which also may apply to such persons collectively.

Fr. Piroird worked as a missionary in the Algeria from 1968, after meeting with an Algerian emigrants in his native Lyons. Upon his arrival, he served both pastor of Bejaia, in Kabylie, and engineer in the direction of hydraulics of the wilayah (prefecture). [2]

A Christian mission is an organized effort to spread Christianity to new converts. Missions often involve sending individuals and groups, called missionaries, across boundaries, most commonly geographical boundaries, for the purpose of proselytism. This involves evangelism, and humanitarian work, especially among the poor and disadvantaged. There are a few different kinds of mission trips: short-term, long-term, relational and ones meant simply for helping people in need. Some might choose to dedicate their whole lives to missions as well. Missionaries have the authority to preach the Christian faith, and provide humanitarian aid. Christian doctrines permit the provision of aid without requiring religious conversion.

Algeria country in North Africa

Algeria, officially the People's Democratic Republic of Algeria, is a country in the Maghreb region of North Africa. The capital and most populous city is Algiers, located in the far north of the country on the Mediterranean coast. With an area of 2,381,741 square kilometres (919,595 sq mi), Algeria is the tenth-largest country in the world, the world's largest Arab country, and the largest in Africa. Algeria is bordered to the northeast by Tunisia, to the east by Libya, to the west by Morocco, to the southwest by the Western Saharan territory, Mauritania, and Mali, to the southeast by Niger, and to the north by the Mediterranean Sea. The country is a semi-presidential republic consisting of 48 provinces and 1,541 communes (counties). It has the highest human development index of all non-island African countries.

Kabylie Place in Algeria

Kabylie, or Kabylia, is a cultural region, natural region, and historical region in northern Algeria. It is part of the Tell Atlas mountain range, and is located at the edge of the Mediterranean Sea.

On March 25, 1983, after retirement of his predecessor, he was appointed as a bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Constantine. He was consecrated to the Episcopate on June 3, 1983. [2] The principal consecrator was Bishop Jean Scotto with another prelates of the Roman Catholic Church. [1]

Consecration is the solemn dedication to a special purpose or service, usually religious. The word consecration literally means "association with the sacred". Persons, places, or things can be consecrated, and the term is used in various ways by different groups. The origin of the word comes from the Latin word consecrat, which means dedicated, devoted, and sacred. A synonym for to consecrate is to sanctify; a distinct antonym is to desecrate.

Episcopal polity Hierarchical form of church governance

An episcopal polity is a hierarchical form of church governance in which the chief local authorities are called bishops. It is the structure used by many of the major Christian Churches and denominations, such as the Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Church of the East, Anglican, and Lutheran churches or denominations, and other churches founded independently from these lineages.

Consecrator bishop who makes a person into a priest or another bishop

In the Roman Catholic Church, a consecrator is a bishop who ordains a priest to the episcopal state. The term is also used in Eastern Rite Churches and in Anglican communities.

In this office Bishop Peroird served until his retirement on November 21, 2008, [1] and returning to France, where he died on April 3, 2019. [2]

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "Bishop Gabriel Jules Joseph Piroird, Ist. del Prado". Catholic-Hierarchy.org . David M. Cheney. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  2. 1 2 3 "Décès du « père Gaby », évêque émérite de Constantine". La Croix (in French). Retrieved 9 April 2019.
Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Jean Scotto
Diocesan Bishop of Constantine
1983–2008
Succeeded by
Paul Desfarges