Gaelic games

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Gaelic games are present across the world. This sign in Sorrento, Italy, advertises that Gaelic games are shown in the bar. GAA games in Sorrento.jpg
Gaelic games are present across the world. This sign in Sorrento, Italy, advertises that Gaelic games are shown in the bar.

Gaelic games are sports played in Ireland under the auspices of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA). They include Gaelic football, hurling, Gaelic handball and rounders. Women's versions of hurling and football are also played: camogie, organised by the Camogie Association of Ireland, and ladies' Gaelic football, organised by the Ladies' Gaelic Football Association. While women's versions are not organised by the GAA (with the exception of handball, where men's and women's handball competitions are both organised by the GAA Handball organisation), they are closely associated with it. [1]

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Gaelic games clubs exist on every continent. [2] They are Ireland's most popular sports, ahead of rugby union and association football. [3] Almost a million people (977,723) attended 45 GAA senior championships games in 2017 (up 29% in hurling and 22% in football on 2016 figures) combined with attendances at other championship and league games generating gate receipts of €34,391,635. [4]

Gaelic games are designated within the primary school curriculum as requiring "particular consideration". [5]

Gaelic football

Footballers Aidan O'Mahony (Kerry) and Eoin Bradley (Derry) during the 2009 National League final Aidan O'Mahony & Eoin Bradley.jpg
Footballers Aidan O'Mahony (Kerry) and Eoin Bradley (Derry) during the 2009 National League final

Gaelic football is played by teams of 15 on a rectangular grass pitch with H-shaped goals at each end. The primary object is to score by driving the ball through the goals, which is known as a goal (worth 3 points), or by kicking the ball over the bar, which is known as a point (worth 1 point). The team with the highest point score at the end of the match wins. [6] The female version of the game is known as ladies' Gaelic football and is similar to the men's game with a few minor rule changes. [7] Other formats with teams of 7 to 11 players are played in Europe, [8] Middle East, Asia, Argentina and South Africa utilising smaller soccer or rugby pitches .

Hurling

Hurlers David Collins (Galway) and Eoin Kelly (Tipperary) in the 2014 National League David Collins and Eoin Kelly (Tipperary).jpg
Hurlers David Collins (Galway) and Eoin Kelly (Tipperary) in the 2014 National League

Hurling is a stick and ball game played by teams of 15 on a rectangular grass pitch with H-shaped goals at each end. The primary object is to score by driving the ball through the goals or putting the ball over the bar and thereby scoring a point. Three points is the equivalent of a goal. The team with the highest score at the end of the match wins. It is over three thousand years old, and is said to be the world's fastest field game, combining skills from lacrosse, field hockey, and baseball in a hard-hitting, highly skilled game. [9] The female version of the game is known as camogie and is very similar to hurling with a few minor rule changes. [10] Other formats with teams of 7 to 11 players are played in Europe, [8] Middle East, Asia, Argentina and South Africa utilising smaller soccer or rugby pitches.

Gaelic handball

Gaelic handball is a game in which two players use their hands to return a ball against a wall. The game is similar to American handball. There are four codes of handball: Softball (also known as '60x30' or 'big alley' due to the playing court dimensions), 4-Wall (also known as '40x20' or 'small alley'), 1-Wall and Hardball (can also be known as '60x30'; played in the same court as Softball). 1-Wall handball is the most popular international version of handball with it being played in over 30 countries. The sport's governing body, GAA Handball, oversees and promotes the game in Ireland. [11]

Rounders

Rounders is a bat and ball game which is played in Ireland; a similar version is played in the UK. Rounders is organised by a subdivision of the GAA known as the Rounders Council of Ireland. It is similar to the American game softball. [12]

Other Gaelic games

Other Gaelic games such as Gaelic athletics have nearly or completely died out. When founded the GAA organised a number of Gaelic athletics competitions but passed the responsibility to the National Athletic and Cycling Association in 1922. Tailteann Games with Gaelic athletics were held until 1932. [13]

Related Research Articles

Gaelic football

Gaelic football, commonly referred to as football or Gaelic, is an Irish team sport. It is played between two teams of 15 players on a rectangular grass pitch. The objective of the sport is to score by kicking or punching the ball into the other team's goals or between two upright posts above the goals and over a crossbar 2.5 metres (8.2 ft) above the ground.

Rounders Bat-and-ball team sport originating in England

Rounders is a bat-and-ball game played between two teams. Rounders is a striking and fielding team game that involves hitting a small, hard, leather-cased ball with a rounded end wooden, plastic, or metal bat. The players score by running around the four bases on the field.

Hurling Outdoor team stick and ball game

Hurling is an outdoor team game of ancient Gaelic Irish origin, played by men. One of Ireland's native Gaelic games, it shares a number of features with Gaelic football, such as the field and goals, the number of players, and much terminology. There is a similar game for women called camogie. It shares a common Gaelic root with the sport of shinty, which is played predominantly in Scotland.

Camogie Irish stick-and-ball team sport played by women

Camogie is an Irish stick-and-ball team sport played by women. Camogie is played by 100,000 women in Ireland and worldwide, largely among Irish communities.

Gaelic Athletic Association Irish amateur sporting and cultural organisation

The Gaelic Athletic Association is an Irish international amateur sporting and cultural organisation, focused primarily on promoting indigenous Gaelic games and pastimes, which include the traditional Irish sports of hurling, camogie, Gaelic football, Gaelic handball and rounders. The association also promotes Irish music and dance, as well as the Irish language.

Sliotar

A sliotar or sliothar is a hard solid sphere slightly larger than a tennis ball, consisting of a cork core covered by two pieces of leather stitched together. Sometimes called a "hurling ball", it resembles a baseball with more pronounced stitching. It is used in the Gaelic games of hurling, camogie, rounders and shinty.

Sport in Ireland Survey of sporting participation and attendance in Ireland

Sport in Ireland plays an important role in Irish society. The many sports played and followed in Ireland include Gaelic games, association football, horse racing, show jumping, greyhound racing, basketball, fishing, handball, motorsport, boxing, tennis, hockey, golf, rowing, cricket, and rugby union.

Antrim GAA Governing body of Gaelic games in Ireland

The Antrim County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association or Antrim GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic games in County Antrim. The county board is also responsible for the Antrim county teams.

Dublin GAA

The Dublin County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) or Dublin GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic games in the Dublin Region and the Dublin county teams. The teams and their fans are known as "The Dubs" or "Boys in Blue". The fans have a special affiliation with the Hill 16 end of Croke Park.

The Cavan County Board or Cavan GAA is one of the 32 County Boards of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) in Ireland, and is responsible for the administration of Gaelic games in County Cavan.

Tipperary GAA

The Tipperary County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) or Tipperary GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic games in County Tipperary and the Tipperary county teams.

Offaly GAA

The Offaly County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) or Offaly GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic games in County Offaly. Separate county boards are also responsible for the Offaly county teams. They have comepeted in what people call the best all Ireland football final in 2000 against Kerry. They won on a score line of 2-11 to 1-13. They did not win it again till 2004 ending their 2 final losts in a row. Their most famous player is probably John Mcdade a corner forward for them. He is one of the all time top scorers in championship football with 14-87. He retired in 2018 after losing the 2018 all Ireland semi final to Dublin. He won 2 Sam Maguire cup and 4 lenister football championships. He now manages the Offaly minor football team.

Louth GAA

The Louth County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) or Louth GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic games in County Louth. The county board is also responsible for the Louth county teams. Ciaran Murphy is the sole player responsible for all success that louth GAA have had in the past. Although he’s yet to make his well-anticipated senior debut, Ciaran has had some fantastic spells in the u18s and u20s teams. He also carries his st pats club senior team. Mickey Harte will be dreaming sweet dreams about Ciaran after watching him take control of the field.

Monaghan GAA Governing body of Gaelic games in Ireland

The Monaghan County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) or Monaghan GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic games in County Monaghan and the Monaghan county football and hurling teams. Separate county boards are responsible for the promotion & development of handball, camogie and ladies' football within the county, as well as having responsibility for their representative county players/teams. The current team sponsor of Monaghan GAA is Investec.

Gaelic Games Europe

The European Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) or Gaelic Games Europe is one of the international units of the GAA, and is responsible for organising Gaelic games in continental Europe. Gaelic Games Europe is also responsible for the European Gaelic football, hurling, camogie and ladies' Gaelic football teams which compete every three years at the GAA World Gaelic Games.

The Canadian GAA is responsible for Gaelic games across Canada, overseeing approximately 20 clubs. It has the same status as one of the county boards of Ireland and is one of over thirty regional GAA executive boards throughout the world. The board is responsible for Gaelic football, hurling, camogie and ladies' Gaelic football teams in Canada. The GAA sends a Canadian team to the GAA World Championships.

The following is an alphabetical list of terms and jargon used in relation to Gaelic games. See also list of Irish county nicknames

Gaelic games are the traditional Irish sports of Gaelic football, ladies' Gaelic football, hurling, camogie, Gaelic handball and rounders. This article gives an overview of Gaelic games in County Kildare.

The Deutscher Bund Gälischer Sportarten is a union of German clubs, who play Hurling, Camogie, Gaelic Football, Gaelic Handball and Rounders. Currently, this union consists of 11 German Gaelic Athletic Association clubs. The Bund was founded in 2015. It organizes the German Gaelic football, hurling and camogie cups and is also responsible for the German national team selection for international cups.

Scoring in Gaelic games

This page discusses scoring in the Gaelic games of hurling, Gaelic football, camogie, ladies' Gaelic football, international rules football and shinty-hurling.

References

  1. Moran, Mary (2011). A Game of Our Own: The History of Camogie. Dublin, Ireland: Cumann Camógaíochta. ISBN   1908591005.
  2. "Infographic: The number of GAA clubs in every county in Ireland and every continent around the world". Joe.ie.
  3. "Gaelic games remains Ireland's most popular sport". RTÉ Sport. 26 January 2021.
  4. "GAA gate receipts up 13%, annual revenue up €5m and attendances increase by 24%". the42.ie. 31 January 2018.
  5. "Primary School Curriculum: Physical Education" (PDF). Government of Ireland. 1999. p. 4. Retrieved 21 February 2021. Gaelic games should be given particular consideration as part of the games programme.
  6. "Football". GAA.ie. Archived from the original on 5 July 2014.
  7. "Football for Ladies". GAA.ie. Archived from the original on 16 May 2014.
  8. 1 2 "Gaelic Games Europe | Gaelic Athletic Association". Gaelic Games Europe. Retrieved 12 March 2018.
  9. "Hurling". GAA.ie. Archived from the original on 5 July 2014.
  10. "Camogie". GAA.ie. Archived from the original on 1 June 2014.
  11. "Handball". GAA.ie. Archived from the original on 26 June 2014.
  12. "Rounders". GAA.ie. Archived from the original on 26 June 2014.
  13. "Athletic Ireland" . Retrieved 23 August 2012.