Gakken Compact Vision TV Boy

Last updated
Compact Vision TV Boy
Developer Gakken
Type Home video game console
Generation Second generation
Release date
  • JP: October 1983
Introductory price¥8,800
Media ROM cartridge
CPU Motorola MC6801 (Inside cartridge)
Memory2k RAM
Display128 × 192 pixels, 4 colors
Graphics Motorola MC6847 video processor

The Compact Vision TV Boy(Japanese:TV ボーイ, Hepburn:TV bōi) is a second generation home video game console developed by Gakken and released in Japan on 1983. [1]

Japanese is an East Asian language spoken by about 128 million people, primarily in Japan, where it is the national language. It is a member of the Japonic language family, and its relation to other languages, such as Korean, is debated. Japanese has been grouped with language families such as Ainu, Austroasiatic, and the now-discredited Altaic, but none of these proposals has gained widespread acceptance.

Hepburn romanization is a system for the romanization of Japanese that uses the Latin alphabet to write the Japanese language. It is used by most foreigners learning to spell Japanese in the Latin alphabet and by the Japanese for romanizing personal names, geographical locations, and other information such as train tables, road signs, and official communications with foreign countries. Largely based on English writing conventions, consonants closely correspond to the English pronunciation and vowels approximate the Italian pronunciation.

In the history of video games, the second-generation era refers to computer and video games, video game consoles, and video game handheld consoles available from 1976 to 1992. Notable platforms of the second generation include the Fairchild Channel F, Atari 2600, Intellivision, Odyssey², and ColecoVision. This generation began in November 1976 with the release of the Fairchild Channel F; followed by the Atari 2600 in 1977; Magnavox Odyssey² in 1978; Intellivision in 1980; and then the Emerson Arcadia 2001, ColecoVision, Atari 5200, and Vectrex. But, by the end of the era, there were over 15 different consoles. It coincided with, and was partly fueled by, the golden age of arcade video games, a peak era of popularity and innovation for the medium. Many games for second generation home consoles were ports of arcade games. The Atari 2600 was the first to port a game in 1980, with Space Invaders, and ColecoVision bundled in Nintendo's Donkey Kong for the system when it was released in August 1982.

The system was released early in the Third generation, but its 4 color graphics and low screen resolution place it in the second generation, making it the last second gen system.

In the history of computer and video games, the third generation began on July 15, 1983, with the Japanese release of two systems: the Nintendo Family Computer and Sega SG-1000. This generation marked the end of the North American video game crash, and a shift in the dominance of home video games from the United States to Japan. Handheld consoles were not a major part of this generation, although the Game & Watch line from Nintendo had started in 1980 and the Milton Bradley Microvision came out in 1979.

The system was made to compete with the Epoch Cassette Vision, which had a market dominance of 70% in Japan.

The console was released months after the Nintendo Famicom and Sega SG-1000 which, although more expensive at ¥15,000, were more advanced and had more features; furthermore Epoch had just launched the Cassette Vision Jr. revision for ¥5,000. These factors made the console obsolete from the start, with a high price tag, few games, and a strange form factor, leading to poor sales. As a result it is now a rare and collectible system.

Games

There were 6 games released for the system, each being sold for ¥3,800;

<i>Frogger</i> 1981 arcade game

Frogger is a 1981 arcade game developed by Konami. It was licensed for North American distribution by Sega-Gremlin and worldwide by Sega itself. It is regarded as a classic from the golden age of video arcade games, noted for its novel gameplay and theme. The object of the game is to direct frogs to their homes one by one by crossing a busy road and navigating a river full of hazards.

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