Gakken Compact Vision TV Boy

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Compact Vision TV Boy
Gakken Compact Vision TV Boy Logo.svg
Compact Vision TV Boy, Gakken 01.png
A Gakken Compact Vision TV Boy
Developer Gakken
Type Home video game console
Generation Second generation
Release date
  • JP: October 1983
Introductory price¥8,800
Media ROM cartridge
CPU Motorola MC6801 (inside cartridge)
Memory2k RAM
Display128 × 192 pixels, 4 colors
Graphics Motorola MC6847 video processor

The Compact Vision TV Boy (Japanese: TV ボーイ, Hepburn: TV bōi) is a second generation home video game console developed by Gakken and released in Japan in 1983 for a price of ¥8,800. [1]

Contents

The system was made to compete with the Epoch Cassette Vision, which had a market dominance of 70% in Japan.

The console was released months after the Nintendo Famicom and Sega SG-1000 which, although more expensive at ¥15,000, were more advanced and had more features as well as a bigger games library; furthermore, Epoch had just launched the Cassette Vision Jr. revision for ¥5,000. These factors made the console obsolete from the start, with a high price tag, few games, and a strange form factor, leading to poor sales. As a result, it is now a rare and collectible system.

Technical specifications

Games

There were only 6 games officially released for the system, each being sold for ¥3,800; [1]

Each of the games is designed for one player only. [3]

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 "Compact Vision TV Boy by Gakken – the Video Game Kraken".
  2. 1 2 "Gakken Compact Vision TV Boy [BINARIUM]". binarium.de. Retrieved 2020-06-15.
  3. "The Video Game Console Library". Video Game Console Library. Retrieved 2020-06-15.