Galaxy Award (China)

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The Galaxy Award [1] (Chinese:银河奖, pinyin: yín hé jiǎng) is China's most prestigious [2] science fiction award, which was started in 1986 [3] by the magazines Zhihui Shu (Tree of Wisdom) and Kexue Shijie (Science Literature and Art). The award is now organized solely by the magazine Kehuan Shijie (Science Fiction World), a rebranding Kexue Shijie. [4]

China Country in East Asia

China, officially the People's Republic of China (PRC), is a country in East Asia and the world's most populous country, with a population of around 1.404 billion. Covering approximately 9,600,000 square kilometers (3,700,000 sq mi), it is the third- or fourth-largest country by total area. Governed by the Communist Party of China, the state exercises jurisdiction over 22 provinces, five autonomous regions, four direct-controlled municipalities, and the special administrative regions of Hong Kong and Macau.

The structure of the prize has evolved over time, becoming an annual prize in 1991 and has recognized different categories over time.

In September 2016, the 27th galaxy award was held at the Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics; [4] [5] , in November 2017, the 28th award ceremony was held in Chengdu, China. [3]

Beijing Municipality in Peoples Republic of China

Beijing, formerly romanized as Peking, is the capital of the People's Republic of China, the world's third most populous city proper, and most populous capital city. The city, located in northern China, is governed as a municipality under the direct administration of central government with 16 urban, suburban, and rural districts. Beijing Municipality is surrounded by Hebei Province with the exception of neighboring Tianjin Municipality to the southeast; together the three divisions form the Jingjinji metropolitan region and the national capital region of China.

Chengdu Prefecture-level & Sub-provincial city in Sichuan, Peoples Republic of China

Chengdu, formerly romanized as Chengtu, is a sub-provincial city which serves as the capital of Sichuan province, People's Republic of China. It is one of the three most populous cities in Western China, the other two being Chongqing and Xi'an. As of 2014, the administrative area housed 14,427,500 inhabitants, with an urban population of 10,152,632. At the time of the 2010 census, Chengdu was the 5th-most populous agglomeration in China, with 10,484,996 inhabitants in the built-up area including Xinjin County and Deyang's Guanghan City. Chengdu is also considered a World City with a "Beta +" classification according to the Globalization and World Cities Research Network.

Recent Winners

A partial list of winners:

2016 [4]

2017 [3]

2018 [6]

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References

  1. Clute, John, "Yinhe Award", Science Fiction Encyclopedia, 3rd edition. Accessed 21 Nov. 2017
  2. Regina Kanyu Wang, "Report on the Award Ceremony of the 25th Galaxy Awards, China’s Highest Science Fiction Award", Amazing Stories, October 20, 2014. Accessed 21 Nov. 2017
  3. 1 2 3 "2017 Galaxy Awards", Locus, November 20, 2017. Accessed 21 Nov. 2017
  4. 1 2 3 "China’s Galaxy Awards announce top winners for 2016", Global Yimes, Sept. 9, 2016. Accessed 24 Feb. 2019
  5. Shaoyan Hu, "Final Results for 2016 Galaxy Award and Chinese Nebula Award", Amazing Stories, September 26, 2016. Accessed 21 Nov. 2017
  6. "Britain's Richard Morgan wins China's prestigious sci-fi award" 2018-11-24 Accessed 24 Feb. 2019