Garrett Arbelbide

Last updated
Garrett Arbelbide
Biographical details
Born(1909-09-05)September 5, 1909
Redlands, California
DiedJuly 24, 1983(1983-07-24) (aged 73)
Sacramento, California
Playing career
Football
1929–1931 USC
Baseball
1930–1932 USC
1933 Hollywood Stars
Position(s) End (football)
Outfielder, first baseman (baseball)
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1932–1934 Modesto JC (line)
1935 La Verne
1936–1939 Arizona State–Flagstaff
Basketball
1932–1935 Modesto JC
Baseball
1933–1935 Modesto JC
Head coaching record
Overall14–27–4 (college football)

Garrett W. Arbelbide (September 5, 1909 – July 24, 1983) was an American football and baseball player and football coach.

Contents

A native of San Bernardino County, California, [1] he grew up in Redlands and played college football at the end position for the USC Trojans football team from 1929 to 1931. He was selected by the Newspaper Enterprise Association and the New York Evening Post as a first-team end on the 1930 College Football All-America Team. [2] [3] He was also selected as a second-team All-American by the Associated Press. [4] He also played on the 1931 USC Trojans football team that won a national championship.

Arbelbide also played college baseball at USC from 1930 to 1932 and professional baseball as an outfielder for the Hollywood Stars of the Pacific Coast League in 1933. [5] He served as the head football coach at La Verne College—now known as the University of La Verne—in 1935 and at Arizona State Teachers College at Flagstaff—now known as Northern Arizona University—from 1936 to 1939. [6] [7]

Arbelbide also served in the United States army during the World War II era, and worked as a teacher and rancher. He was married to Fern Arbelbide and had three children (Garrett Lea, Janice and Cindy Lea) and lived in Bakersfield, Santa Barbara, Lodi and Pioneer, California, in his later years. He died in a Sacramento hospital in 1983 at age 72. [8] [9] He was posthumously inducted into the USC Hall of Fame in 1999.

Head coaching record

College football

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
La Verne Leopards (Southern California Conference)(1935)
1935 La Verne3–6–10–46th
La Verne:3–6–10–4
Arizona State Flagstaff–Lumberjacks (Border Conference)(1936–1939)
1936 Arizona State–Flagstaff3–4–12–2–1T–4th
1937 Arizona State–Flagstaff5–51–46th
1938 Arizona State–Flagstaff2–6–11–25th
1939 Arizona State–Flagstaff1–6–10–47th
Arizona State–Flagstaff:11–21–34–12–1
Total:14–27–4

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References

  1. Birth record for Garrett W. Arbelbide. Ancestry.com. California Birth Index, 1905-1995 [database on-line].
  2. L.S. "Larry" MacPhail (December 13, 1933). "NEA Service's All-America Teams". Olean Times.
  3. "Eastern Scribe Like Russell: Former Husker Listed All-American By New York Post". Lincoln Star. November 29, 1930.
  4. Alan Gould (December 6, 1930). "Middle West Holds Edge in Selection Of 1930 All-American Grid Teams: Poll By Associated Press Selected Stars For Mythical Eleven". Evening Independent.
  5. "Garrett Arbelbide Minor League Statistics". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved January 16, 2015.
  6. "Arbelbide Named Head Coach at La Verne". Los Angeles Times . Los Angeles, California. United Press. August 25, 1935. p. 19. Retrieved February 1, 2019 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .
  7. "Garrett Arbelbide Gets Flagstaff Job". Arizona Daily Star . Tucson, Arizona. Associated Press. May 22, 1936. p. 11. Retrieved February 1, 2019 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .
  8. "Garrett Arbelbide". Lodi News-Sentinel. 1983.
  9. Death record for Garrett Arbelbide, born September 5, 1909, died July 24, 1983. Ancestry.com. California, Death Index, 1940-1997 [database on-line].