Gaston Doumergue

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Gaston Doumergue
Gaston Doumergue 1924.jpg
Doumergue in 1924, as the Grand Master of the Legion of Honour
President of France
In office
13 June 1924 13 June 1931
Prime Minister
Preceded by Alexandre Millerand
Succeeded by Paul Doumer
Prime Minister of France
In office
9 February 1934 8 November 1934
President Albert François Lebrun
Preceded by Édouard Daladier
Succeeded by Pierre-Étienne Flandin
In office
9 December 1913 9 June 1914
President Raymond Poincaré
Preceded by Louis Barthou
Succeeded by Alexandre Ribot
Personal details
Born
Pierre-Paul-Henri-Gaston Doumergue

1 August 1863
Aigues-Vives, France
Died18 June 1937 (aged 73)
Aigues-Vives, France
Political party Radical Party
Alma mater University of Paris
Doumergue, taken c. 1910-1915 Doumergue 4953635257 cea812010b o.jpg
Doumergue, taken c.1910–1915

Pierre-Paul-Henri-Gaston Doumergue (French pronunciation:  [ɡastɔ̃ dumɛʁɡ] ; 1 August 1863 in Aigues-Vives, Gard  18 June 1937 in Aigues-Vives) was a French politician of the Third Republic.

Contents

Life

Doumergue came from a Protestant family and was a freemason. [1] [2] [3] Beginning as a Radical, he turned more towards the political right in his old age. He served as President of the council (prime minister) from 9 December 1913 to 2 June 1914. He held the portfolio for the colonies through the ministries of Viviani and Briand until the Ribot ministry of March, 1917, when he was sent to Russia to persuade the Kerensky government not to make a separate peace with Germany and Austria. He was elected the thirteenth President of France on 13 June 1924, the only Protestant to hold that office. He served until 13 June 1931, and again was Prime Minister in a conservative national unity government, following the riots of 6 February 1934. This government lasted from 6 February to 8 November 1934.

He was widely regarded as one of the most popular French Presidents, particularly after highly controversial Alexandre Millerand, who was his predecessor. Doumergue was single when elected, and became the first President of France to marry in office. [4]

Doumergue's First Ministry, 9 December 1913 – 9 June 1914

Changes

Doumergue's Second Ministry, 9 February – 8 November 1934

Time cover, 21 Jul 1924 Gaston Doumergue-TIME-1924.jpg
Time cover, 21 Jul 1924

Changes

See also

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References

  1. Dictionnaire universelle de la Franc-Maçonnerie (Marc de Jode, Monique Cara and Jean-Marc Cara, ed. Larousse , 2011)
  2. Dictionnaire de la Franc-Maçonnerie (Daniel Ligou, Presses Universitaires de France, 2006)
  3. Ce que la France doit aux francs-maçons (Laurent KUPFERMAN,Emmanuel PIERRA, ed. Grund, 2012)
  4. Sciolino, Elaine (3 February 2008). "French Leader and Ex-Model Wed in Quiet Ceremony". New York Times. Retrieved 10 August 2008.

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Political offices
Preceded by
Albert Decrais
Minister of Colonies
1902–1905
Succeeded by
Étienne Clémentel
New office Minister of Labour
1906
Succeeded by
René Viviani
Preceded by
Georges Trouillot
Minister of Commerce and Industry
1906–1908
Succeeded by
Jean Cruppi
Preceded by
Aristide Briand
Minister of Public Instruction and Fine Arts
1908–1910
Succeeded by
Maurice Faure
Preceded by
Louis Barthou
Prime Minister of France
1913–1914
Succeeded by
Alexandre Ribot
Preceded by
Stéphen Pichon
Minister of Foreign Affairs
1913–1914
Succeeded by
Léon Bourgeois
Preceded by
René Viviani
Minister of Foreign Affairs
1914
Succeeded by
Théophile Delcassé
Preceded by
Maurice Raynaud
Minister of Colonies
1914–1917
Succeeded by
André Maginot
Preceded by
Léon Bourgeois
President of the Senate
1923–1924
Succeeded by
Justin de Selves
Preceded by
Alexandre Millerand
President of France
1924–1931
Succeeded by
Paul Doumer
Preceded by
Édouard Daladier
Prime Minister of France
1934
Succeeded by
Pierre Étienne Flandin
Regnal titles
Preceded by
Alexandre Millerand
Co-Prince of Andorra
1924–1931
With Justí Guitart i Vilardebó
Succeeded by
Paul Doumer
Preceded by
Justí Guitart i Vilardebó
Succeeded by
Justí Guitart i Vilardebó
Awards and achievements
Preceded by
Alexey Rykov
Cover of Time Magazine
21 July 1924
Succeeded by
William Sproule