Gaye Stewart

Last updated
Gaye Stewart
Born(1923-06-28)June 28, 1923
Fort William, Ontario, Canada
Died November 18, 2010(2010-11-18) (aged 87)
Burlington, Ontario, Canada
Height 5 ft 11 in (180 cm)
Weight 170 lb (77 kg; 12 st 2 lb)
Position Left Wing
Shot Right
Played for Toronto Maple Leafs
Chicago Black Hawks
Detroit Red Wings
New York Rangers
Montreal Canadiens
Playing career 19411955

James Gaye Stewart (June 28, 1923 – November 18, 2010) was a professional ice hockey forward. He played nine seasons as a left winger in the National Hockey League.

Contents

Playing career

Born in Fort William, Ontario, Stewart was called from the minors in 1942 to play in one game of the Stanley Cup Finals, where he helped the Toronto Maple Leafs win the Stanley Cup. [1] The next season, Stewart won the 1942–43 Calder Memorial Trophy, beating out Maurice 'The Rocket' Richard of the Montreal Canadiens. [1] He became the first player to win the Stanley Cup before the Calder. Danny Grant, Tony Esposito and Ken Dryden have accomplished the feat since then.

After spending two years in the Royal Canadian Navy during World War II, Stewart returned to the NHL in 1945 and had his best season, leading the league with 37 goals - the last time a Leaf led the League in goals before Auston Matthews in 2020–21. [1] Stewart won his second Stanley Cup, again with the Maple Leafs, in 1946–47. Toronto traded Stewart to Chicago early in the 1947–48 season in a deal that brought Max Bentley to the Leafs. Stewart had three 20-goal seasons for the Black Hawks before finishing his career with stints with the Detroit Red Wings, New York Rangers and Montreal Canadiens. [1] In all, Gaye Stewart played for five of the NHL's Original Six teams, all except the Boston Bruins. He played 502 career NHL games, scoring 185 goals and 159 assists for 344 points. Stewart died on November 18, 2010, in a hospital in Burlington, Ontario, at the age of 87.

Awards and achievements

Career statistics

   Regular season   Playoffs
Season TeamLeagueGP G A Pts PIM GPGAPtsPIM
1939–40Port Arthur Bruins TBJHL 161762318582104
1940–41 Toronto Marlboros OHA-Jr. 1631134416121372010
1941–42 Toronto MarlborosOHA-Jr.1313821263474
1941–42 Hershey Bears AHL 54260104590
1941–42 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 10000
1942–43 Toronto Maple LeafsNHL482423472040224
1943–44 Montreal Royals QSHL 104711846280
1943–44Montreal NavyMCHL657122574114
1944–45Cornwallis NavyNSDHL1197161233472
1945–46 Toronto Maple LeafsNHL503715528
1946–47 Toronto Maple LeafsNHL6019143315
1946–47Valleyfield BravesQSHL11010
1947–48 Toronto Maple LeafsNHL71010
1947–48 Chicago Black Hawks NHL5426295583
1948–49 Chicago Black HawksNHL5420183857
1949–50 Chicago Black HawksNHL7024194343
1950–51 Detroit Red Wings NHL671813311860224
1951–52 New York Rangers NHL6915254022
1952–53 New York RangersNHL181128
1952–53 Montreal Canadiens NHL5022030000
1952–53 Quebec Aces QMHL2913203328221612288
1953–54 Buffalo Bisons AHL704253953830224
1953–54 Montreal CanadiensNHL30000
1954–55 Buffalo BisonsAHL6017193636
NHL totals50218515934427425291116

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References

Preceded by
Grant Warwick
Winner of the Calder Memorial Trophy
1943
Succeeded by
August 'Gus' Bodnar
Preceded by
John Mariucci
Chicago Black Hawks captain
1948–49
Succeeded by
Doug Bentley