Gene Allen (art director)

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Gene Allen
Born(1918-06-17)June 17, 1918
DiedOctober 7, 2015(2015-10-07) (aged 97)
Occupation Art director
Years active1938-1975

Eugene "Gene" Allen (June 17, 1918 – October 7, 2015) was an American art director. [1] He followed his father and became a Los Angeles Police officer after he was laid off from his first job as a sketch artist. After serving in the United States Navy during World War II, Allen went to art school to pursue his career. He won an Oscar in 1965 for Best Art Direction for My Fair Lady , [2] and was nominated for A Star Is Born in 1955 [3] and for Les Girls in 1958. [4] He served as President of the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences from 1983 to 1985 and received a Special Achievement Award from the Art Directors Guild in 1997. Allen died on October 7, 2015 at the age of 97. [5]

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References

  1. The Art Directors Guild profile Accessed 7 January 2009
  2. "The 37th Academy Awards (1965) Nominees and Winners". oscars.org. Retrieved July 23, 2011.
  3. "The 27th Academy Awards (1955) Nominees and Winners". oscars.org. Retrieved October 10, 2015.
  4. "The 30th Academy Awards (1958) Nominees and Winners". oscars.org. Retrieved October 10, 2015.
  5. Variety, Gene Allen Academy President dead
Non-profit organization positions
Preceded by
Fay Kanin
President of the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences
1983-1985
Succeeded by
Robert Wise