Gene McEver

Last updated

Gene McEver
Gene McEver.jpg
Biographical details
Born(1908-09-15)September 15, 1908
Birmingham, Alabama
DiedJuly 12, 1985(1985-07-12) (aged 76)
Davidson, North Carolina
Playing career
1928–1929 Tennessee
1931 Tennessee
Position(s) Halfback
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1932–1935 Davidson (assistant)
1936–1943 Davidson
1944 North Carolina
1945–1947 Virginia Tech (backfield)
Head coaching record
Overall22–54–5
Accomplishments and honors
Awards
All-American, 1929
All-American, 1931
College Football Hall of Fame
Inducted in 1954 (profile)

Eugene Tucker McEver (September 15, 1908 – July 12, 1985) was an American football player and coach. He played college football at the University of Tennessee, where he was an All-American halfback. McEver served as the head football coach at Davidson College from 1936 to 1943 and at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1944, compiling a career record of 22–54–5. He was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame as a player in 1954.

Contents

Playing career

McEver attended high school in Bristol, Virginia. He was the first ever All-American for the Tennessee Volunteers football team. He played for the Volunteers in 1928, 1929, and 1931 under Robert Neyland, missing the 1930 season with a knee injury. McEver scored 130 points for the Vols in 1929, helping them to a 9–0–1 record. The total led the NCAA in scoring that season, and his mark still stands at the single season scoring record at Tennessee. In December 2008, Sports Illustrated undertook to identify the individuals who would have been awarded the Heisman Trophy in college football's early years, before the trophy was established. McEver was selected as the would-be Heisman winner for the 1929 season. [1] McEver also holds the record for career scoring at Tennessee among non-kickers. McEver finished his career at Tennessee with 44 touchdowns and 12 points after touchdown for 276 points. He was named to the All-Southern team in 1928, 1929, and 1931, joining teammates Bobby Dodd and Herman Hickman. He stood 5'10", weighed 185 pounds, and wore number 28.

Coaching career

McEver coached at Davidson College in North Carolina from 1937 through 1943. His record there was 21–47–4. McEver also coached the University of North Carolina to a 1–7–1 record in 1944. He was an assistant coach at Virginia Tech from 1945 to 1947.

Head coaching record

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Davidson Wildcats (Southern Conference)(1936–1943)
1936 Davidson5–44–37th
1937 Davidson2–81–616th
1938 Davidson4–62–612th
1939 Davidson2–71–713th
1940 Davidson5–51–514th
1941 Davidson 1–6–31–5–213th
1942 Davidson2–6–12–4–1T–10th
1943 Davidson0–5
Davidson:21–47–4
North Carolina Tar Heels (Southern Conference)(1944)
1944 North Carolina 1–7–10–3–19th
North Carolina:1–7–10–3–1
Total:22–54–5

See also

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References

  1. Mike Beacom (December 12, 2008). "Who would have won the Heisman from 1900-1934". Sports Illustrated.