Gene Milford

Last updated
Gene Milford
Born
Arthur Eugene Milford

(1902-01-19)January 19, 1902
Lamar, Colorado, United States
DiedDecember 23, 1991(1991-12-23) (aged 89)
Santa Monica, California, United States
OccupationFilm and television editor
Years active1926–1979
Known forOne hundred feature film credits
Notable workLost Horizon - 1937
On the Waterfront - 1954
A Face in the Crowd - 1957
Wait Until Dark - 1967
AwardsAcademy Award for Best Film Editing for Lost Horizon

Arthur Eugene Milford (January 19, 1902 – December 23, 1991) was an American film and television editor with about one hundred feature film credits. Among his most noted films are Lost Horizon (directed by Frank Capra - 1937), On the Waterfront (directed by Elia Kazan - 1954), A Face in the Crowd (Kazan - 1957), and Wait Until Dark (directed by Terence Young - 1967). [1]

Contents

Milford won the Academy Award for Best Film Editing for Lost Horizon (with Gene Havlick) and for On the Waterfront; he was also nominated for an Academy Award for One Night of Love (directed by Victor Schertzinger - 1934). He had been elected to the American Cinema Editors, and he and Barbara McLean received its inaugural Career Achievement Awards in 1988.

Partial filmography

Marlon Brando and Eva Marie Saint in the trailer for the 1954 film On the Waterfront, for which Milford won the Academy Award for Best Film Editing Eva marie saint marlon brando waterfront 10.jpg
Marlon Brando and Eva Marie Saint in the trailer for the 1954 film On the Waterfront , for which Milford won the Academy Award for Best Film Editing

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References

  1. Honan, William H. (January 7, 1992). "Arthur Milford, 89, Film Editor, Is Dead; Winner of 2 Oscars". The New York Times.

Further reading