Gene Tunney

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Gene Tunney
Gene Tunney Portrait LOC.jpg
Tunney c. 1925
Statistics
Real nameJames Joseph Tunney
Nickname(s)The Fighting Marine
Weight(s)
Height6 ft 0 in (183 cm)
Reach76 in (193 cm)
NationalityAmerican
Born(1897-05-25)May 25, 1897
New York City, U.S.
DiedNovember 7, 1978(1978-11-07) (aged 81)
Greenwich, Connecticut, U.S.
Stance Orthodox
Boxing record
Total fights88
Wins82
Wins by KO49
Losses1
Draws4
No contests1

James Joseph "Gene" Tunney (May 25, 1897 – November 7, 1978) was an American professional boxer who competed from 1915 to 1928. He held the world heavyweight title from 1926 to 1928, and the American light heavyweight title twice between 1922 and 1923. A highly technical boxer, Tunney had a five-fight light heavyweight rivalry with Harry Greb in which he won three, drew once, and lost once, though many ringside reporters believed Greb should have won the decision in their 2nd meeting. He also knocked out Georges Carpentier and defeated Jack Dempsey twice; first in 1926 and again in 1927. Tunney's successful title defense against Dempsey remains one of the most famous bouts in boxing history and is known as The Long Count Fight. He retired undefeated as a heavyweight after his victory over Tom Heeney in 1928, after which Tunney was named Fighter of the Year by The Ring magazine.

Contents

Early life

Mary Lydon from Culleen House, Gorthgarve, Kiltimagh, County Mayo, Ireland, emigrated to the United States after the Great Famine. She settled in New York City, where she met John Tunney, also from Cill Aodain, Kiltimagh. They married after a short courtship. The Tunneys had seven children; one son was murdered around 1920, another was a New York Police Department detective from 1924 to 1951, dying in 1971, while Gene would become famous as a World Heavyweight Boxing Champion. At an early age, Tunney was inspired by President Theodore Roosevelt to become physically fit. [1]

Career

Tunney in Marine uniform Gene Tunney in Marine uniform.jpg
Tunney in Marine uniform

Tunney fought some 68 official professional fights, losing only one, to Harry Greb, while fighting as a light heavyweight. Tunney fought many other fights whose scoring was unofficial, judged by newspaper reporters. He also lost none of these "newspaper decisions." He reported that he lost a second fight during World War I, a 10-round decision, to Tommy Loughran, as a Marine before he began his professional boxing career. Tunney was regarded as an extremely skillful boxer who excelled in defense. In addition to beating Dempsey, the most famous fighter of his era, Tunney defeated Tommy Gibbons, Georges Carpentier and many other fine boxers.

Already the U.S. Expeditionary Forces champion, Tunney spent the winter of 1921 as a lumberjack in northern Ontario for the J. R. Booth Company of Ottawa, without revealing he was a champion boxer. He explained this as "wanting the solitude and the strenuous labors of the woods to help condition himself for the career that appeared before him." [2]

Tunney also had a brief acting career, starring in the movie The Fighting Marine in 1926. Unfortunately, no prints of this film are known to exist.

He was elected as Ring Magazine's first-ever Fighter of the Year in 1928 and later elected to the World Boxing Hall of Fame in 1980, the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 1990 and the United States Marine Corps Sports Hall of Fame in 2001.

Military career

Tunney enlisted the Marine Corps during World War I and served as Private with 11th Marine Regiment in France and later in Germany during the occupation of the Rhineland in 1919. He saw no combat and spent most of the war in the Marine boxing team, becoming U.S. Expeditionary Forces champion. Tunney was demobilized following the war, but remained in the Marine Corps Reserve, ultimately reaching the rank of Major in the Connecticut Naval Militia.

Following the United States entry into World War II, at the request of Navy Undersecretary James Forrestal, Tunney accepted a commission in the United States Naval Reserve as a lieutenant commander to set up a physical fitness program for student pilots. He headed the Navy's physical fitness programme for the duration of the war and also made inspection trip to Hawaii and surrounding area. [3]

Tunney was consecutively promoted to the ranks of Commander and Captain and retired shortly following the War. For his wartime service, he was decorated with the Navy Commendation Medal and also held World War I Victory Medal with France Clasp, Army of Occupation of Germany Medal, American Defense Service Medal, American Campaign Medal, Asiatic Pacific Campaign Medal, World War II Victory Medal and Marine Corps Good Conduct Medal for his World War I enlisted service.

Personal life

In 1928, Tunney married a wealthy socialite, the former Mary "Polly" Lauder (April 24, 1907 – April 19, 2008). Mrs. Tunney was born into the Lauder Greenway Family; her grandfather was billionaire George Lauder, a first cousin and business partner of industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie. According to a 2007 biography, Tunney promised Polly that he would quit boxing and defended his title only one more time after the second Dempsey fight, against Tom Heeney of New Zealand.

After Mr. Tunney's retirement, the couple lived in Stamford, Connecticut and raised four children. [4] They had three boys including John Varick Tunney (1934–2018), who was a U.S. Representative and U.S. Senator from California from 1965 until 1977; Jonathan "Jay" Rowland Tunney of Stamford, Connecticut; and Gene Lauder Tunney (1931-2009) [5] [6] [7] who became a lawyer and served as district attorney for Sonoma County, California, for 20 years. Their one daughter was Joan Tunney Wilkinson (1939 – 2008) [8] of San Francisco. [9] who was committed to McLean Hospital on June 6, 1970, after she murdered her husband, Lynn Carter Wilkinson Jr. [10] [11] [12] [13]

Previous to his marriage to Mrs. Tunney, Tunney was sued in 1927 for breach of promise by Mrs. Katherine King Fogarty. [14]

Death

Tunney died on November 7, 1978 at the Greenwich Hospital in Connecticut at the age of eighty-one, after suffering from a circulation ailment. [15] He was interred at Long Ridge Union Cemetery in Stamford, Connecticut.

Fighting style

Tunney at Trinity College Dublin, 1928 Gene Tunney at Trinity College.jpg
Tunney at Trinity College Dublin, 1928

Tunney was a thinking fighter who preferred to make a boxing match into a game of chess, which was not popular during the times when such sluggers as Jack Dempsey, Harry Greb and Mickey Walker were commanding center stage. Tunney's style was influenced by other noted boxing thinkers such as James J. Corbett and Benny Leonard. Nevertheless, it is incorrect to think of Tunney as a stick-and-move fighter in the Ali style. While Tunney's heavyweight fights against Gibbons, Carpentier, and Dempsey featured his fleet-footed movement and rapid-fire jabbing, his earlier bouts, especially the five against Harry Greb, demonstrated his vicious body punching and willingness to fight toe-to-toe. It was Benny Leonard who advised Tunney that the only way to beat Harry "The Human Windmill" Greb was to aim his punches at Greb's body rather than his head.[ citation needed ]

Always moving and boxing behind an excellent left jab, Tunney would study his opponents from the first bell. He generally preferred to stay outside and nullify any attacks, while using quick counters to keep the opponent off balance. In his fights against Jack Dempsey, today's viewer can see Tunney's style: hands held low for greater power, fast footwork that adjusts to every move his opponent makes and quick and accurate one-two style counter-punches with the left and right.

Tunney was never knocked out, while only ever being knocked down once, that in his second fight with Dempsey in the infamous Long Count. This makes him one of only five Heavyweight champions, alongside Rocky Marciano, Riddick Bowe, Sultan Ibragimov and Nicolai Valuev to retire without ever suffering a stoppage defeat. Tunney, along with Marciano, Lewis and Vitali Klitschko is one of four heavyweight champions to have retired as champion and to have ended their career with a win in a world title fight. Having avenged his only defeat to Harry Greb, with whom he also drew), Tunney joins Ingemar Johansson, Rocky Marciano, Lennox Lewis and Riddick Bowe as the only five heavyweight champions to have retired while holding a victory over every opponent he faced as a professional (barring no-contests).[ citation needed ]

Publications

In 1932, Tunney published a book called A Man Must Fight, in which he gave comments on his career and boxing techniques.

The Tunney Cup

In 1928, the U.S. Marine Corps presented – as a sign of friendship – a challenge cup to the Corps of Royal Marines, in the hope it might be competed for by Royal Marines association football teams. [16] [17] The Royal Marines named the trophy the "Tunney Cup," in honor of then–USMC Captain Tunney, who, with Sergeant Major Charles R. Francis, presented the trophy on behalf of the U.S. Marine Corps. [16] [17]

Cultural references

Stamp honoring Tunney Gene Tunney.jpg
Stamp honoring Tunney

Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis had a comedy routine in which Lewis (in boxing shorts and gear) states he's fight'n Gene Tierney (the actress). Martin corrects Lewis and suggests that he must mean "Gene Tunney." Lewis then quips "You fight who you wanna fight, I'm fight'n who I wanna fight, I'm fight'n Gene Tierney." [18]

In the song She Twists the Knife Again from Richard Thompson's 1985 album Across a Crowded Room, describing the mismatched intensity in a strife-ladened relationship, Thompson writes: "I'm in a fist fight/She thinks she's Gene Tunney!"

He's also mentioned in Act 1 of Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman : Willy tells his sons he has a punching bag with Tunney's signature on it.

Mentioned in "A Whistle in the Dark" (Act 1, pg. 31) by Tom Murphy : 'in the words of the great Gene Tunney, a man must fight back. His father was a Mayoman too'.

Mentioned in the short story "Fallon" by JD Luther, when imprisoned character Tyson Wayne Vance recalls his abusive father, "Was more than one night momma'd look like she went fifteen rounds with Gene Tunney...",

In the 1932 boxing film Winner Take All , James Cagney's character Jimmy Kane—a has-been former champion trying to get educated—laments that William Shakespeare was "the one who ruined Gene Tunney."

The novelette "A KO for Christmas" by Shawn Pollock features a character, Stitch Stanford, who hopes to fight Gene Tunney for the heavyweight title.

Professional boxing record

Professional record summary
85 fights65 wins1 loss
By knockout480
By decision171
By disqualification00
Draws1
No contests1
Newspaper decisions/draws 17

All Newspaper decisions are regarded as “no decision” bouts as they have “resulted in neither boxer winning or losing, and would therefore not count as part of their official fight record."

No.Result Record Opponent Type Round, time Date Location Notes
85 Win 65–1–1 (18) Flag of New Zealand.svg Tom Heeney TKO 11 (15), 2:5226 Jul 1928 Flag of the United States.svg Yankee Stadium, Bronx, New York, U.S.Retained NBA, NYSAC, and The Ring heavyweight titles
84 Win 64–1–1 (18) Flag of the United States.svg Jack Dempsey UD 10 22 Sep 1927 Flag of the United States.svg Soldier Field, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.Retained NBA, NYSAC, and The Ring heavyweight titles
83 Win 63–1–1 (18) Flag of the United States.svg Jack Dempsey UD 10 23 Sep 1926 Flag of the United States.svg Sesquicentennial Stadium, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.Won NBA, NYSAC, and The Ring heavyweight titles
82 Win 62–1–1 (18) Flag of the United States.svg Dan O'Dowd KO 2 (10), 0:3129 Dec 1925 Flag of the United States.svg Waterfront Park, Saint Petersburg, Florida, U.S.
81 Win 61–1–1 (18) Flag of the United States.svg Johnny Risko NWS 12 18 Nov 1925 Flag of the United States.svg Public Hall, Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.
80 Win 61–1–1 (17) Flag of Ireland.svg Bartley Madden KO 3 (10) 25 Sep 1925 Flag of the United States.svg Minneapolis Arena, Minneapolis, Minnesota, U.S.
79 Win 60–1–1 (17) Flag of the United States.svg Italian Jack Herman KO 2 (10) 3 Jul 1925 Flag of the United States.svg Memorial Hall, Kansas City, Kansas, U.S.
78 Win 59–1–1 (17) Flag of the United States.svg Tommy Gibbons KO 12 (15) 5 Jun 1925 Flag of the United States.svg Polo Grounds, New York City, New York, U.S.
77 Win 58–1–1 (17) Flag of the United States.svg Harry Greb NWS 10 27 Mar 1925 Flag of the United States.svg Auditorium, Saint Paul, Minnesota, U.S.
76 Win 58–1–1 (16) Flag of the United States.svg Jeff Smith NWS 15 8 Dec 1924 Flag of the United States.svg Coliseum Arena, New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S.
75 Win 58–1–1 (15) Flag of the United States.svg Buddy McHale TKO 2 (8) 10 Nov 1924 Flag of the United States.svg Southern Athletic Club, Memphis, Tennessee, U.S.
74 Win 57–1–1 (15) Flag of the United States.svg Harry Foley TKO 1 (8), 2:0527 Oct 1924 Flag of the United States.svg Auditorium, Memphis, Tennessee, U.S.
73 Win 56–1–1 (15) Flag of the United States.svg Ray Neuman PTS 10 27 Sep 1924 Flag of the United States.svg Cambria County Fairgrounds, Ebensburg, Pennsylvania, U.S.
72 Draw 55–1–1 (15) Flag of the United States.svg Harry Greb NWS 10 17 Sep 1924 Flag of the United States.svg Olympic Arena, Brooklyn, Ohio, U.S.
71 Win 55–1–1 (14) Flag of the United States.svg Joe Lohman TKO 8 (12) 18 Aug 1924 Flag of the United States.svg Fairmont Arena, Columbus, Ohio, U.S.
70 Win 54–1–1 (14) Flag of France.svg Georges Carpentier TKO 15 (15), 0:1424 Jul 1924 Flag of the United States.svg Polo Grounds, New York City, New York, U.S.
69 Win 53–1–1 (14) Flag of Italy.svg Erminio Spalla TKO 7 (12) 26 Jun 1924 Flag of the United States.svg Yankee Stadium, Bronx, New York, U.S.
68 Win 52–1–1 (14) Flag of the United States.svg Jimmy Delaney NWS 10 17 Mar 1924 Flag of the United States.svg Auditorium, Saint Paul, Minnesota, U.S.
67 Win 52–1–1 (13) Flag of the United States.svg Martin Burke PTS 15 15 Feb 1924 Flag of the United States.svg Coliseum Arena, New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S.
66 Win 51–1–1 (13) Flag of the United States.svg Ray Thompson KO 2 (10) 24 Jan 1924 Flag of the United States.svg Legion Arena, West Palm Beach, Florida, U.S.
65 Win 50–1–1 (13) Flag of the United States.svg Harry Foley NWS 10 15 Jan 1924 Flag of the United States.svg Coliseum, Grand Rapids, Michigan, U.S.
64 Win 50–1–1 (12) Flag of the United States.svg Harry Greb UD 15 10 Dec 1923 Flag of the United States.svg Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York, U.S.Retained ABA light-heavyweight title
63 Win 49–1–1 (12) Flag of the United States.svg Dan O'Dowd PTS 12 31 Jul 1923 Flag of the United States.svg Queensboro Stadium, New York City, New York, U.S.
62 Win 48–1–1 (12) Flag of the United States.svg Jimmy Delaney NWS 10 16 May 1923 Flag of the United States.svg Chicago Coliseum, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.
61 Win 48–1–1 (11) Flag of the United States.svg Jack Clifford TKO 8 (10) 7 May 1923 Flag of the United States.svg Fair Grounds Coliseum, Detroit, Michigan, U.S.
60 Win 47–1–1 (11) Flag of the United States.svg Harry Greb SD15 23 Feb 1923 Flag of the United States.svg Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York, U.S.Won ABA light-heavyweight title
59 Win 46–1–1 (11) Flag of the United States.svg Chuck Wiggins PTS 12 3 Feb 1923 Flag of the United States.svg Commonwealth Sporting Club, New York City, New York, U.S.
58 NC45–1–1 (11) Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Jack Renault NC 4 (8) 29 Jan 1923 Flag of the United States.svg Philadelphia Arena, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.
57 Win 45–1–1 (10) Flag of Austria.svg Charley Weinert KO 4 (15) 29 Nov 1922 Flag of the United States.svg Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York, U.S.
56 Win 44–1–1 (10) Flag of the United States.svg Jack Hanlon KO 1 (12), 1:223 Nov 1922 Flag of the United States.svg Clermont Avenue Skating Rink, Brooklyn, New York, U.S.
55 Win 43–1–1 (10) Flag of the United States.svg Chuck Wiggins PTS 10 27 Oct 1922 Flag of the United States.svg Mechanics Hall, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.
54 Draw 42–1–1 (10) Flag of the United States.svg Tommy Loughran NWS 8 24 Aug 1922 Flag of the United States.svg Shibe Park, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.
53 Win 42–1–1 (9) Flag of Austria.svg Charley Weinert NWS 12 17 Aug 1922 Flag of the United States.svg Broad Athletic Club, Newark, New Jersey, U.S.
52 Win 42–1–1 (8) Flag of the United States.svg Ray Thompson KO 3 (10) 4 Aug 1922 Flag of the United States.svg Ocean Park Casino, Long Branch, New Jersey, U.S.
51 Win 41–1–1 (8) Flag of the United States.svg Fay Keiser PTS 12 7 Jul 1922 Flag of the United States.svg Rockaway Beach Arena, Queens, New York, U.S.
50 Loss 40–1–1 (8) Flag of the United States.svg Harry Greb UD15 23 May 1922 Flag of the United States.svg Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York, U.S.Lost ABA light-heavyweight title
49 Win 40–0–1 (8) Flag of the United States.svg Jack Burke TKO 9 (10) 10 Apr 1922 Flag of the United States.svg Motor Square Garden, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.
48 Win 39–0–1 (8) Flag of the United States.svg Fay Keiser NWS 10 3 Mar 1922 Flag of the United States.svg Armory, Grand Rapids, Michigan, U.S.
47 Win 39–0–1 (7) Flag of the United States.svg Whitey Wenzel TKO 4 (8) 14 Feb 1922 Flag of the United States.svg Philadelphia_Arena, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.
46 Win 38–0–1 (7) Flag of the United States.svg Jack Clifford TKO 6 (12), 2:5011 Feb 1922 Flag of the United States.svg Clermont Avenue Skating Rink, Brooklyn, New York, U.S.
45 Win 37–0–1 (7) Flag of the United States.svg Battling Levinsky PTS 12 13 Jan 1922 Flag of the United States.svg Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York, U.S.Won vacant ABA light-heavyweight title
44 Win 36–0–1 (7) Flag of the United States.svg Eddie O'Hare KO 6 (8) 22 Dec 1921 Flag of the United States.svg Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York, U.S.
43 Win 35–0–1 (7) Flag of Norway.svg Wolf Larsen TKO 7 (12), 1:3525 Oct 1921 Flag of the United States.svg Pioneer Sporting Club, New York City, New York, U.S.
42 Win 34–0–1 (7) Flag of the United States.svg Jack Burke TKO 3 (8) 14 Oct 1921 Flag of the United States.svg Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York, U.S.
41 Win 33–0–1 (7) Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Herbert Crossley PTS 7 26 Sep 1921 Flag of the United States.svg Dyckman Oval, New York City, New York, U.S.
40 Win 32–0–1 (7) Flag of the United States.svg Eddie Josephs PTS 12 18 Aug 1921 Flag of the United States.svg Sisco Park, New York City, New York, U.S.
39 Win 31–0–1 (7) Flag of the United States.svg Martin Burke PTS 10 4 Aug 1921 Flag of the United States.svg Dyckman Oval, New York City, New York, U.S.
38 Win 30–0–1 (7) Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Soldier Jones TKO 7 (8) 2 Jul 1921 Flag of the United States.svg Boyle's Thirty Acres, Jersey City, New Jersey, U.S.
37 Win 29–0–1 (7) Flag of the United States.svg Johnny Ambrose KO 1 (12), 2:4528 Jun 1921 Flag of the United States.svg Pioneer Sporting Club, New York City, New York, U.S.
36 Win 28–0–1 (7) Flag of the United States.svg Leo Hauck NWS 10 7 Dec 1920 Flag of the United States.svg 4th Regiment Armory, Jersey City, New Jersey, U.S.
35 Win 28–0–1 (6) Flag of the United States.svg Leo Hauck NWS 6 25 Nov 1920 Flag of the United States.svg Olympia Athletic Club, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.
34 Win 28–0–1 (5) Flag of Germany.svg Paul Samson Koerner NWS 10 25 Oct 1920 Flag of the United States.svg 6th Regiment Armory, Paterson, New Jersey, U.S.
33 Win 28–0–1 (4) Flag of the United States.svg Sergeant Ray Smith TKO 2 (8) 22 Oct 1920 Flag of the United States.svg Sportsman's Club, Camden, New Jersey, U.S.
32 Win 27–0–1 (4) Flag of the United States.svg Ole Anderson TKO 3 (10), 0:4028 Jun 1920 Flag of the United States.svg 4th Regiment Armory, Jersey City, New Jersey, U.S.
31 Win 26–0–1 (4) Flag of the United States.svg Jeff Madden TKO 2 (12) 7 Jun 1920 Flag of the United States.svg 4th Regiment Armory, Jersey City, New Jersey, U.S.
30 Win 25–0–1 (4) Flag of the United States.svg Jack Clifford KO 3 (10) 9 Apr 1920 Flag of the United States.svg Community Hall, Johnson City, New York, U.S.
29 Win 24–0–1 (4) Flag of the United States.svg K.O. Sullivan KO 1 (8), 2:155 Apr 1920 Flag of the United States.svg 1st Regiment Armory, Newark, New Jersey, U.S.
28 Win 23–0–1 (4) Flag of the United States.svg Ed Kinley KO 5 (8) 4 Mar 1920 Flag of the United States.svg Grand View Auditorium, Jersey City, New Jersey, U.S.
27 Win 22–0–1 (4) Flag of the United States.svg Al Roberts KO 8 (8), 1:062 Feb 1920 Flag of the United States.svg 1st Regiment Armory, Newark, New Jersey, U.S.
26 Win 21–0–1 (4) Flag of the United States.svg Jim Monahan KO 1 (8), 2:5026 Jan 1920 Flag of the United States.svg 4th Regiment Armory, Jersey City, New Jersey, U.S.
25 Win 20–0–1 (4) Flag of the United States.svg Bud Nelson KO 1 (8) 20 Jan 1920 Flag of the United States.svg Schuetzen Park, Bayonne, New Jersey, U.S.
24 Win 19–0–1 (4) Flag of the United States.svg Whitey Allen KO 2 (8) 1 Jan 1920 Flag of the United States.svg Schuetzen Park, Bayonne, New Jersey, U.S.
23 Win 18–0–1 (4) Flag of the United States.svg Bob Pearce KO 2 (8) 29 Dec 1919 Flag of the United States.svg 4th Regiment Armory, Jersey City, New Jersey, U.S.
22 Win 17–0–1 (4) Flag of the United States.svg Dan O'Dowd NWS 8 16 Dec 1919 Flag of the United States.svg Schuetzen Park, Bayonne, New Jersey, U.S.
21 Win 17–0–1 (3) Flag of the United States.svg Ted Jamieson PTS 10 26 Apr 1919 Flag of France.svg Cirque de Paris, Paris, FranceWon American Expeditionary Forces light-heavyweight title
20 Win 16–0–1 (3) Flag of the United States.svg K.O. Sullivan PTS 10 14 Apr 1919 Flag of France.svg Paris, France
19 Win 15–0–1 (3) Flag of France.svg Dare Lewis KO 3 31 Mar 1919 Flag of France.svg Tours, Paris, France
18 Win 14–0–1 (3) Flag of the United States.svg Bob Martin PTS 4 27 Jan 1919 Flag of France.svg Salle Wagram, Paris, France
17 Win 13–0–1 (3) Flag of France.svg Victor Marchand KO 2 9 Jan 1919 Flag of France.svg Paris, France
16 Draw 12–0–1 (3) Flag of the United States.svg Tommy Gavigan PTS10 20 Dec 1918 Flag of France.svg Romorantin-Lanthenay, Loir-et-Cher, France
15 Win 12–0 (3) Flag of the United States.svg Howard Morrow KO 6 10 Dec 1918 Flag of France.svg Romorantin-Lanthenay, Loir-et-Cher, France
14 Win 11–0 (3) Flag of the United States.svg Johnny Newton KO 6 20 Nov 1918 Flag of France.svg Romorantin-Lanthenay, Loir-et-Cher, France
13 Win 10–0 (3) Flag of Germany.svg Hank Werhl KO 6 1 Nov 1918 Flag of France.svg Romorantin-Lanthenay, Loir-et-Cher, France
12 Win 9–0 (3) Flag of the United States.svg Young Guerini KO 1 (8) 8 Jul 1918 Flag of the United States.svg 4th Regiment Armory, Jersey City, New Jersey, U.S.
11 Win 8–0 (3) Flag of the United States Virgin Islands.svg Hugh Weir KO 2 (10) 15 Jan 1918 Flag of the United States.svg Pioneer Sporting Club, New York City, New York, U.S.
10 Win 7–0 (3) Flag of the United States.svg Joe Borrell KO 2 (10) 28 Dec 1917 Flag of the United States.svg New Polo Athletic Club, New York City, New York, U.S.
9 Win 6–0 (3) Flag of the United States.svg Sailor Wolfe KO 2 (10) 29 Dec 1916 Flag of the United States.svg Miners 8th St Theater, New York City, New York, U.S.
8 Win 5–0 (3) Flag of the United States.svg George Leahy NWS 6 22 Dec 1916 Flag of the United States.svg Miners 8th St Theater, New York City, New York, U.S.
7 Win 5–0 (2) Flag of the United States.svg Young Sharkey KO 6 (10) 15 Dec 1916 Flag of the United States.svg Miners 8th St Theater, New York City, New York, U.S.
6 Win 4–0 (2) Flag of the United States.svg Young Guerini TKO 8 (10) 8 Dec 1916 Flag of the United States.svg Miners 8th St Theater, New York City, New York, U.S.
5 Draw 3–0 (2) Flag of the United States.svg KO Jaffe NWS 10 21 Jul 1916 Flag of the United States.svg New Polo Athletic Club, New York City, New York, U.S.
4 Win 3–0 (1) Flag of the United States.svg Billy Rowe NWS6 1 Dec 1915 Flag of the United States.svg Fairmont Athletic Club, Bronx, New York, U.S.
3 Win 3–0 Flag of the United States.svg George Leahy KO 2 (6) 28 Aug 1915 Flag of the United States.svg Fairmont Athletic Club, Bronx, New York, U.S.
2 Win 2–0 Flag of the United States.svg Battling Genrimo KO3 (10) 6 Aug 1915 Flag of the United States.svg Miner's Bowery Theatre, New York City, New York, U.S.
1 Win 1–0 Flag of the United States.svg Bobby Dawson TKO8 (10) 3 Jul 1915 Flag of the United States.svg Sharkey Athletic Club, New York City, New York, U.S.

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Professional boxing Full contact combat sport

Professional boxing, or prizefighting, is regulated, sanctioned boxing. Professional boxing bouts are fought for a purse that is divided between the boxers as determined by contract. Most professional bouts are supervised by a regulatory authority to guarantee the fighters' safety. Most high-profile bouts obtain the endorsement of a sanctioning body, which awards championship belts, establishes rules, and assigns its own judges and referees.

Tommy Gibbons American professional heavyweight boxer

Thomas Joseph Gibbons was an American professional heavyweight boxer.

Battling Levinsky American boxer

Barney Lebrowitz, better known as Battling Levinsky, was the world light heavyweight champion from 1916 to 1920. Statistical boxing website BoxRec lists Levinsky as the #12 ranked light heavyweight of all-time, while The Ring Magazine founder Nat Fleischer placed him at #9. The International Boxing Research Organization rates Levinsky as the 20th best light heavyweight ever. He was inducted into the Ring Magazine Hall of Fame in 1966, the International Jewish Sports Hall of Fame in 1982, and the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 2000.

Philadelphia Jack OBrien American boxer

Joseph Francis Hagan was the world light heavyweight boxing champion in 1905 when he defeated Bob Fitzsimmons for the universal world title. Rather than defending his title, O'Brien instead abandoned it in order to fight at heavyweight. Nat Fleischer, founder and editor of The Ring Magazine, ranked O'Brien as the No. 2 All-Time Light Heavyweight, and famed boxing promoter Charley Rose ranked him as the No. 3 All-Time Light Heavyweight. O'Brien was inducted into the Ring Magazine hall of fame in 1968, the World Boxing Hall of Fame in 1987, and the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 1994.

Whitey Bimstein American boxer

Whitey Bimstein was born on January 10, 1897 in New York's Lower East Side. He would be remembered for his exceptional career as a boxing trainer and cutman to world champions. Though his cutwork was usually confined to only forty seconds between rounds, it amazed Doctors for its thoroughness and professionalism.

Frank Moody Wales boxer

Frank Moody was a Welsh boxer who fought between 1914 and 1936. He is most notable for winning the British and Empire middleweight boxing championship in 1927 and 1928 and the light-heavyweight title from 1927 to 1929.

Jeff Smith (boxer) American boxer, born 1891

Jerome "Jeff Smith" Jefferds was an American professional boxer who held the Australian version of the World Middleweight Title during his career. Despite his relative anonymity, Smith faced off against some the best fighters of his era, including Harry Greb, Gene Tunney, Mike Gibbons, Georges Carpentier, Les Darcy and Tommy Loughran. Statistical boxing website BoxRec lists Smith as the 17th greatest middleweight ever, while Ring Magazine founder Nat Fleischer ranked Smith as the No. 10 Middleweight of all-time. He was inducted into the Ring Magazine hall of fame in 1969 and the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 2013.

Jack Dempsey versus Georges Carpentier was a boxing fight between world heavyweight champion Jack Dempsey and world light-heavyweight champion Georges Carpentier, which was one of the fights named the "Fight of the Century". The bout took place in the United States on Saturday, July 2, 1921, at Boyle's Thirty Acres in Jersey City, New Jersey.

References

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  8. Deceased Members - Mount Holyoke College
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  15. "Tunney, Boxing Champion Who Beat Dempsey, Dies. Lectured on Shakespeare". New York Times . November 8, 1978. Retrieved 2008-10-16. Gene Tunney, the former heavyweight boxing champion who twice defeated Jack Dempsey, died yesterday at the Greenwich Hospital in Connecticut. He was 80 years old and had been suffering from a circulation ailment.
  16. 1 2 Foster, Shaun. "A Brief History of the Royal Marines Football Association". Royal Marines Football Association. Archived from the original on 2016-02-23. Retrieved 2017-03-14.
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Sporting positions
World boxing titles
Preceded by
Jack Dempsey
The Ring heavyweight champion
September 23, 1926 – July 31, 1928
Vacant
Title next held by
Max Schmeling
World heavyweight champion
September 23, 1926 – July 31, 1928