Geoffrey (archbishop of York)

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  1. He was sometimes called Geoffrey Plantagenet, [1] fitzPlantagenet, [2] or fitzRoy. [3]
  2. Henry also held the duchies of Normandy and Aquitaine and the counties of Maine, Touraine and Anjou in France. [6] These lands were central to Henry's power and he spent much time outside England in his continental possessions. [7] King Richard, who succeeded Henry in 1189, also spent most of his time outside England. [8] Although John, Richard's younger brother who became king in 1199, lost Normandy, he still retained the other possessions and continued to spend much time on the continent. [9]
  3. Her name is sometimes spelled Hikenai. [11]
  4. Other speculations on her background have included her being a Welsh hostage at Henry's court or that she was either a servant or a daughter of one of the royal servants, but not of noble blood. [12]
  5. In 1191 Geoffrey was irate at the destruction of Rosamund's shrine at Godstow Abbey. Geoffrey was also fond of Godstow for his entire life, and while archbishop attempted to add Clementhorpe Priory to the endowment of Godstow. Another piece of circumstantial evidence is the name Map gives for Geoffrey's mother. It is possible that Ykenai is derived from Acquigny, and Acquigny Castle was likely held by members of the Clifford family. Further, William Longespée, the son of another reputed child of Rosamund, tried to claim land near Akeny in 1228. [10]
  6. Geoffrey should not be confused with Henry's legitimate son Geoffrey, Duke of Brittany, who was born in 1158 and died in 1186. [6]
  7. Peter is called Geoffrey's "half-brother" by the historian Diana Greenway, but she does not state whether or not he was Geoffrey's maternal or paternal half-brother. [16] Peter is not mentioned by Henry's biographer as a son of the king. [17]
  8. This took the form of a ceremony of resignation, although the formal date of his resignation was not until the second ceremony in England in 1182. [10]
  9. Burchard is called variously the nephew [10] or the son of Hugh by modern historians. [39]
  10. Gerald of Wales relates a story that Richard changed the text of the agreement from the agreed-upon 2000 marks to £2000, thus increasing the amount Geoffrey owed by a third. [40]
  11. The rivalry, usually known as the Canterbury–York dispute, [49] began shortly after the Norman Conquest and did not end until the 14th century. [50] [51]
  12. Richard was held captive in Germany while returning from crusade and was only released after the payment of a ransom, which was 150,000 marks. To raise this sum, all of Richard's subjects were taxed at the rate of 25% for both their incomes and their possessions. These payments were required from both laymen and the clergy. [8]
  13. It is in Latin on parchment containing 185 folios with 23 miniatures, now at Leiden in the University Library under catalogue MS. lat. 76A. [68]

Citations

  1. Turner and Heiser Reign of Richard Lionheart p. 284
  2. Wahlgren "Peter of Blois" English Historical Review p. 1205
  3. Barlow Thomas Becket p. 325
  4. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Greenway "Archbishops" Fasti Ecclesiae Anglicanae 1066–1300: Volume 6: York
  5. Warren Henry II p. 78 note 1
  6. 1 2 Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 36
  7. Clanchy England and its Rulers pp. 99–101
  8. 1 2 Clanchy England and its Rulers pp. 118–119
  9. Clanchy England and its Rulers pp. 178–180
  10. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 Lovatt "Geoffrey" Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
  11. 1 2 3 4 Given-Wilson and Curteis Royal Bastards pp. 103–104
  12. Shepherd "Bastards of Henry II" Genealogists' Magazine p. 362
  13. 1 2 Quoted in Jones "Generation Gap" Albion p. 28
  14. Given-Wilson and Curteis Royal Bastards p. 118
  15. Given-Wilson and Curteis Royal Bastards p. 179
  16. Greenway "Archdeacons of York" Fasti Ecclesiae Anglicanae 1066–1300: Volume 6: York
  17. Warren Henry II p. 78 footnote 1
  18. Greenway "Archdeacons of Lincoln" Fasti Ecclesiae Anglicanae 1066–1300: Volume 3: Lincoln
  19. McGurk Dictionary p. 32
  20. Greenway "Bishops of Lincoln" Fasti Ecclesiae Anglicanae 1066–1300: Volume 3: Lincoln
  21. Morey Bartholomew of Exeter p. 37
  22. Cheney Roger of Worcester p. 215
  23. Scammell Hugh du Puiset pp. 38–39
  24. Quoted in Lovatt "Geoffrey" Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
  25. Richardson "Schools of Northampton" English Historical Review p. 599
  26. Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 255
  27. 1 2 Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 84
  28. 1 2 Greenway "Treasurers of York" Fasti Ecclesiae Anglicanae 1066–1300: Volume 6: York
  29. Hamilton Religion in the Medieval West p. 39
  30. Greenway "Prebends of York" Fasti Ecclesiae Anglicanae 1066–1300: Volume 6: York
  31. Wahlgren "Peter of Blois" English Historical Review p. 1212
  32. Spear Personnel p. 216
  33. 1 2 Lyon Constitutional and Legal History pp. 233–236
  34. 1 2 3 Turner "Richard Lionheart and English Episcopal Elections" Albion p. 4
  35. 1 2 3 Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 281
  36. Warren King John p. 39
  37. Turner King John pp. 35–36
  38. 1 2 Turner and Heiser Reign of Richard Lionheart pp. 89–90
  39. Turner and Heiser Reign of Richard Lionheart p. 95
  40. Scammell Hugh du Puiset p. 177
  41. Turner and Heiser Reign of Richard Lionheart p. 123
  42. Warren King John p. 42
  43. Turner and Heiser Reign of Richard Lionheart pp. 126–128
  44. Gillingham Richard I p. 228
  45. Powell and Wallis House of Lords pp. 98–99
  46. Scammell Hugh du Puiset p. 172
  47. Scammell Hugh du Puiset pp. 178–181
  48. Cheney Hubert Walter pp. 52–53
  49. Bethell "William of Corbeil" Journal of Ecclesiastical History pp. 156–157
  50. Carpenter Struggle for Mastery p. 99
  51. Young Hubert Walter pp. 88–89
  52. Robinson Papacy p. 173
  53. Scammell Hugh du Puiset p. 55
  54. Gillingham Richard I p. 270
  55. Lyon Constitutional and Legal History pp. 305–306
  56. Gillingham "Historians without Hindsight" King John p. 13
  57. 1 2 Joliffe Angevin Kingship pp.114–115
  58. Warren King John p. 149
  59. Mitchell Taxation in Medieval England pp. 177–178
  60. Hallam "Henry II, Richard I and the order of Grandmont" Journal of Medieval History p. 171
  61. Jones "Generation Gap" Albion p. 28
  62. Holt Northerners p. 204
  63. Turner and Heiser Reign of Richard Lionheart pp. 77–78
  64. Quoted in Turner and Heiser Reign of Richard Lionheart p. 77
  65. Turner King and His Courts p. 84
  66. Cheney Hubert Walter pp. 164–165
  67. Young Hubert Walter p. 57
  68. 1 2 Morgan Survey of Manuscripts pp. 61–62

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Further reading

  • Douie, D. (1960). Archbishop Geoffrey Plantagenet and the chapter of York. Borthwick Papers. Vol. 18. York, UK: St Anthony's Hall Press. OCLC   2204595.
  • Lovatt, Marie (2009). "Archbishop Geoffrey of York: A Problem in Anglo-French Maternity". In Vincent, Nicholas (ed.). Records, Administration and Aristocratic Society in the Anglo-Norman Realm: Papers Commemorating the 800th Anniversary of King John's Loss of Normandy. Woodbridge, UK: Boydell Press. pp. 91–124. ISBN   978-1-84383-485-4.
Geoffrey
Archbishop of York
AppointedAugust 1189
Term ended12 December 1212
Predecessor Roger de Pont L'Évêque
Successor Walter de Gray
Other post(s) Bishop of Lincoln-elect
Archdeacon of Lincoln
Orders
Ordination23 September 1189
Consecration18 August 1191
by  Bartholomew, the Archbishop of Tours
Personal details
Bornabout 1152
Died12 December 1212
Normandy
BuriedNotre Dame du Parc, Rouen, Seine-Maritime, France
House
Parents Henry II of England
Ykenai (possibly)
Lord Chancellor
In office
1181–1189
Political offices
Preceded by Lord Chancellor
1181–1189
Succeeded by
Catholic Church titles
Preceded by Bishop of Lincoln
1173–1183
Succeeded by
Preceded by Archbishop of York
1181–1212
Succeeded by