Geoffrey of Vendôme

Last updated

Geoffrey of Vendôme (Goffridus Abbas Vindocinensis) (c. 1065/70 of a noble family, at Angers, France 26 March 1132 at Angers, France) was a French Benedictine monk, writer and cardinal.

At an early age he entered the Benedictine community of the Blessed Trinity at Vendôme in the diocese of Chartres; and in 1093, while still very young and only a deacon, was chosen abbot of the community.

During all his lifetime he showed a great attachment to the Holy See. Thus, in 1094, he went to Rome in order to help Pope Urban II (1088–99) to take possession of the Lateran, still held by the faction of the antipope Clement III (1080–1100); the money which he offered to the custodian brought about the surrender. [1]

In compensation he was created a cardinal-priest by Urban II, with the titular church of St. Prisca on the Aventine. No less than twelve times did he make the journey to Italy in the interest of the Church of Rome during the pontificates of Urban II, Paschal II (1099–1118), and Callistus II (1119–24); and on three different occasions he was made a captive.

In 1096 and 1107 he extended the hospitality of his monastery to Popes Urban and Paschal. He took part in the councils held at Clermont in 1095, by Pope Urban; at Saintes, in 1096, by the Apostolic Legate Amatus of Bordeaux; and at Reims, in 1131, by Innocent II (1130–43).

He also strenuously defended the ecclesiastical principles in the question of investitures, which he qualified in several small tracts as heresy and simony; he wrote in the same spirit to Pope Paschal II when the latter made concessions (1111) to Emperor Henry V (1106–25). Finally, he always defended firmly the prerogatives, the rights, and the property of his abbey at Vendôme against the encroachments of either bishops or secular princes.

Geoffrey was one of the distinguished men of his age, and was in correspondence with many eminent personalities of that time. His writings consist of a number of letters; of a series of tracts on the investitures of ecclesiastics by laymen, on the Sacraments of the Holy Eucharist, Baptism, Confirmation, and Extreme Unction, on ascetic and pastoral subjects; hymns to the Blessed Virgin and St. Mary Magdalene; sermons on the feasts of Our Lord, the Blessed Virgin, Mary Magdalene, and St. Benedict.

Related Research Articles

Pope Callixtus II Pope from 1119 to 1124

Pope Callixtus II or Callistus II, born Guy of Burgundy, was head of the Catholic Church and ruler of the Papal States from 1 February 1119 to his death in 1124. His pontificate was shaped by the Investiture Controversy, which he was able to settle through the Concordat of Worms in 1122.

Pope Sergius II pope

Pope Sergius II was pope from January 844 to his death in 847.

Primate (bishop) High-ranking bishop in certain Christian churches

Primate is a title or rank bestowed on some archbishops in certain Christian churches. Depending on the particular tradition, it can denote either jurisdictional authority or (usually) ceremonial precedence.

Pope Paschal II pope

Pope Paschal II, born Ranierius, was head of the Catholic Church and ruler of the Papal States from 13 August 1099 to his death in 1118.

Pope Gelasius II Pope from 1118 to 1119

Pope Gelasius II, born Giovanni Caetani or Giovanni da Gaeta, was head of the Catholic Church and ruler of the Papal States from 24 January 1118 to his death in 1119. A monk of Monte Cassino and chancellor of Pope Paschal II, Caetani was unanimously elected to succeed him. In doing so he also succeeded to the conflicts with Emperor Henry V over investiture. Gelasius spent a good part of his brief papacy in exile.

Antipope Gregory VIII antipope 1118—1121

Gregory VIII, born Mauritius Burdinus, was antipope from 10 March 1118 until 22 April 1121.

Antipope Clement III Antipope

Guibert or Wibert of Ravenna was an Italian prelate, archbishop of Ravenna, who was elected pope in 1080 in opposition to Pope Gregory VII and took the name Clement III. Gregory was the leader of the movement in the church which opposed the traditional claim of European monarchs to control ecclesiastical appointments, and this was opposed by supporters of monarchical rights led by the Holy Roman Emperor. This led to the conflict known as the Investiture Controversy. Gregory was felt by many to have gone too far when he excommunicated the Holy Roman Emperor Henry IV and supported a rival claimant as emperor, and in 1080 the pro-imperial Synod of Brixen pronounced that Gregory was deposed and replaced as pope by Guibert.

Antipope Paschal III Italian cardinal and diplomat

Antipope Paschal III was, from 1164 to 20 September 1168, the second of the antipopes to challenge the reign of Pope Alexander III.

Bruno (bishop of Segni) Abbot of Montecassino

Saint Bruno di Segni was an Italian Roman Catholic prelate and professed member from the Order of Saint Benedict who served as the Bishop of Segni and the Abbot of Montecassino. He studied under the Benedictines in Bologna before being appointed as the canon of the Siena cathedral and before he was invited to Rome where he became a bishop and counselled four consecutive popes. He served as an abbot in Montecassino but his chastising Pope Paschal II on the Concordat of Segni in 1111 prompted the pope to relieve him from his duties as abbot and ordered Bruno to return to his diocese where he died just over a decade later.

Leo of Ostia Catholic cardinal

Leo Marsicanus or Ostiensis, also known as Leone dei Conti di Marsi, was a nobleman and monk of Monte Cassino around 1061 and Italian cardinal from the 12th century.

The Clerics Regular of the Mother of God are a Roman Catholic Religious Order of priests, dedicated to education and pastoral care. The Order was founded by St. John Leonardi, who worked with this community to spread devotion to the Blessed Virgin Mary, as well as the Forty Hours devotion, and frequent reception of the Blessed Sacrament. Its members use the suffix of O.M.D.

Tre Fontane Abbey church building in Rome, Italy

Tre Fontane Abbey, or the Abbey of Saints Vincent and Anastasius, is a Roman Catholic abbey in Rome, held by monks of the Cistercian Order of the Strict Observance, better known as Trappists. It is known for raising the lambs whose wool is used to weave the pallia of new metropolitan archbishops. The Pope blesses the lambs on the Feast of Saint Agnes on January 21. The wool is prepared, and he gives the pallia to the new archbishops on the Solemnity of Saints Peter and Paul, the Holy Apostles.

Gebhard (III) of Constance Bishop of Constance

Gebhard III was Bishop of Constance and defender of papal rights against imperial encroachments during the Investiture Controversy.

Papal appointment

Papal appointment was a medieval method of selecting a pope. Popes have always been selected by a council of Church fathers, however, Papal selection before 1059 was often characterized by confirmation or "nomination" by secular European rulers or by their predecessors. The later procedures of the papal conclave are in large part designed to constrain the interference of secular rulers which characterized the first millennium of the Roman Catholic Church, and persisted in practices such as the creation of crown-cardinals and the jus exclusivae. Appointment might have taken several forms, with a variety of roles for the laity and civic leaders, Byzantine and Germanic emperors, and noble Roman families. The role of the election vis-a-vis the general population and the clergy was prone to vary considerably, with a nomination carrying weight that ranged from near total to a mere suggestion or ratification of a prior election.

Pons of Melgueil French abbot

Pons of Melgueil was the seventh Abbot of Cluny from 1109 to 1122.

Santa Lucia in Selci Ancient Roman Catholic church in Rome, Italy

The Church of Saint Lucy in Selci is an ancient Roman Catholic church, located in Rome, dedicated to Saint Lucy, a 4th-century virgin and martyr.

Frankish Papacy

From 756 to 857, the papacy shifted from the orbit of the Byzantine Empire to that of the kings of the Franks. Pepin the Short, Charlemagne, and Louis the Pious had considerable influence in the selection and administration of popes. The "Donation of Pepin" (756) ratified a new period of papal rule in central Italy, which became known as the Papal States.

1099 papal election

The papal election of 1099 took place upon the death of Pope Urban II, the cardinal-electors with the consent of the lower Roman clergy chose Pope Paschal II as his successor.

1073 papal election 1073 election of the Catholic pope

The papal election of 1073 saw the election of Hildebrand of Sovana as successor to Pope Alexander II.

References

  1. Mary Stroll, Calixtus II (1119-1124): A Pope Born to Rule ( ISBN   90-04-13987-7), p. 271

PD-icon.svg  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain : Herbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). " article name needed ". Catholic Encyclopedia . New York: Robert Appleton.