George Belknap

Last updated
George Eugene Belknap
George Eugene Belknap.jpg
BornJanuary 22, 1832
Newport, New Hampshire
DiedApril 7, 1903(1903-04-07) (aged 71)
Key West, Florida
Allegiance United States of America
Service/branchFlag of the United States Navy (1864-1959).svg  United States Navy
Years of service1847–1894
Rank US-O8 insignia.svg Rear admiral
Commands held USS Canonicus
USS Hartford
Battles/wars American Civil War
Formosa Expedition
RelationsRear Admiral Reginald R. Belknap (son) (1871–1959)

George Eugene Belknap (January 22, 1832 – 7 April 1903) was a rear admiral in the United States Navy. USS Belknap (DD-251) was named for him.

Contents

Born in Newport, New Hampshire, Belknap was appointed a Midshipman in 1847. He commanded the monitor Canonicus during the attacks on Battle of Fort Fisher, and the sloop-of-war Hartford during the Formosa Expedition of 1867. He was the senior officer present during the riots following David Kalākaua's election as the King of Hawaii in 1874.

Belknap commanded the United States Naval Observatory from 1885 to 1886 and the Mare Island Naval Shipyard from 1886 to 1890. Belknap was appointed as a rear admiral on 12 February 1889. He served as the Commander of the Asiatic Squadron from 4 April 1889 to 20 February 1892. He retired from the Navy on 22 January 1894.

In August 1902, Belknap and his wife visited the United Kingdom, including Devonport as guests of Rear Admiral William Hannam Henderson, the Admiral Superintendent of the dockyard. [1]

Belknap died at Key West, Florida, 7 April 1903.

Memberships

Belknap was a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, a Veteran Companion of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States (MOLLUS) and an Honorary Companion of the Military Order of Foreign Wars. He was also a member of the New Hampshire Society of the Sons of the American Revolution.

Legacy

A portrait of Admiral Belknap is on display in Luce Hall at the United States Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island.

Family

He was the father of Rear Admiral Reginald R. Belknap who served as national Commander-in-Chief of MOLLUS from 1947 to 1951.

Dates of Rank

Lieutenant Lieutenant Commander Commander Captain Commodore Rear Admiral
O-3O-4O-5O-6O-7O-8
US Navy O3 insignia.svg US Navy O4 insignia.svg US Navy O5 insignia.svg US Navy O6 insignia.svg US Navy O7 insignia.svg US Navy O8 insignia.svg
September 16, 1855July 15, 1862July 15, 1866January 25, 1875June 2, 1885February 12, 1889

See also

Related Research Articles

William T. Sampson US naval officer

William Thomas Sampson was a United States Navy rear admiral known for his victory in the Battle of Santiago de Cuba during the Spanish–American War.

Stephen Clegg Rowan

Stephen Clegg Rowan was a vice admiral in the United States Navy, who served during the Mexican–American War and the American Civil War.

Stephen Luce

Stephen Bleecker Luce was a U.S. Navy admiral. He was the founder and first president of the Naval War College, between 1884 and 1886.

Lewis Kimberly United States Navy admiral (1830–1902)

Rear Admiral Lewis Ashfield Kimberly was an officer in the United States Navy during the American Civil War and the years following.

John Grimes Walker

John Grimes Walker was an admiral in the United States Navy who served during the Civil War. After the war, he served as Chief of the Bureau of Navigation, head of the Lighthouse Board, and commander-in-chief of the Squadron of Evolution and of the North Atlantic Squadron. In retirement, he led commissions to investigate the construction of a Central American canal connecting the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans.

James Agustin Greer United States Navy admiral

James Agustin Greer was a rear admiral in the United States Navy, who served during the Civil War.

Edward D. Taussig

Edward David Taussig was a decorated Rear Admiral in the United States Navy. He is best remembered for being the officer to claim Wake Island after the Spanish–American War, as well as accepting the physical relinquishment of Guam by its indigenous governor following the Treaty of Paris in which Spain ceded Guam to the United States following nearly 300 years of colonial rule. Taussig briefly served as Governor of Guam. He was the first of a four-generational family of United States Naval Academy graduates including his son, Vice Admiral Joseph K. Taussig (1877–1947), grandson Captain Joseph K. Taussig Jr. (1920–1999), and great-grandson, Captain Joseph K. Taussig USMC (1945–).

George H. Wadleigh

Rear Admiral George Henry Wadleigh served in the United States Navy during the American Civil War and the Spanish–American War.

Daniel L. Braine

Daniel Lawrence Braine was an admiral of the United States Navy.

Cameron Winslow

Cameron McRae Winslow served in the United States Navy during the Spanish–American War and World War I. A son of Commander Francis Winslow (I) (1818–1862),

The Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States (MOLLUS), or simply as the Loyal Legion is a United States patriotic order, organized April 15, 1865, by officers of the Army, Navy, or Marine Corps of the United States who "had aided in maintaining the honor, integrity, and supremacy of the national movement" during the American Civil War. It was formed by loyal Union military officers in response to rumors from Washington of a conspiracy to destroy the Federal government by assassination of its leaders, in the immediate aftermath of the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln. They stated their purpose as the cherishing of the memories and associations of the war waged in defense of the unity and indivisibility of the Republic; the strengthening of the ties of fraternal fellowship and sympathy formed by companionship in arms; the relief of the widows and children of dead companions of the order; and the advancement of the general welfare of the soldiers and sailors of the United States. As the original officers died off, the veterans organization became an hereditary society. The modern organization is composed of men who are descendants of these officers, and other men who share the ideals of the Order, who collectively are considered "Companions". A female auxiliary, Dames of the Loyal Legion of the United States (DOLLUS), was formed in 1899 and accepted as an affiliate in 1915.

Thomas Oliver Selfridge United States admiral

Rear Admiral Thomas Oliver Selfridge was an officer in the United States Navy during the Mexican–American War and the American Civil War and was the father of another rear admiral, Thomas O. Selfridge, Jr.

George Brown (admiral)

Rear admiral George Brown was an officer of the United States Navy who served during the American Civil War.

Arthur Bedford Royal Navy Vice-Admiral

Vice-Admiral Arthur Edward Frederick Bedford, CB, CSI was a Royal Navy officer. He served in HMS Kent at the Battle of the Falkland Islands of 1914 and rose to command the Royal Indian Navy from 1934 to 1937, when he retired. A year later he rejoined the colours and served until the end of the Second World War.

Gottfried Blocklinger

Gottfried Blocklinger was a Rear-admiral in the United States Navy; Born in Dubuque, Iowa, October 23, 1847. Notable achievements include: in 1879 as a Lieutenant, he commanded the survey of the Madeira River, in the Amazon. Was a lieutenant on board the USS Baltimore during the Baltimore crisis of 1891. And was the Executive Officer, on board the USS Charleston during the Capture of Guam to the United States during the Spanish–American War in 1898.

Spencer S. Wood United States Navy admiral (1861–1940)

Rear Admiral Spencer Shepard Wood was a United States Navy officer. His career included service in the Spanish–American War and World War I, command of battleships and cruisers, and duty as an aide to a number of senior naval leaders.

Yates Stirling

Yates Stirling was a rear admiral in the United States Navy.

Charles J. Train

Rear Admiral Charles Jackson Train was an officer in the United States Navy. He served in the Spanish–American War and later as the second Commander-in-Chief of the United States Asiatic Fleet.

Philip H. Cooper

Rear Admiral Philip Henry Cooper was an officer in the United States Navy. He fought in the American Civil War and served as Superintendent of the United States Naval Academy and as commander-in-chief of the United States Asiatic Fleet.

Reginald R. Belknap United States Navy admiral (1871–1959)

Rear Admiral Reginald Rowan Belknap was an officer in the United States Navy. He served in the Spanish–American War, Boxer Rebellion, Philippine–American War, and World War I. He gained distinction in 1909 for his relief work in Italy after the 1908 Messina earthquake and tsunami and for his work in command of the first offensive mining campaign in U.S. Navy history, the laying of the North Sea Mine Barrage in 1918. He was also a published author, an inventor, a member of many professional and social organizations, and an active member of the Episcopal Church, and he played a role in the selection of Amelia Earhart as the first female pilot to make a solo flight across the Atlantic Ocean.

References

  1. "Naval & Military intelligence". The Times (36861). London. 1 September 1902. p. 8.

Attribution

This article incorporates text from the public domain Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships .The entry can be found here.
Military offices
Preceded by
Commander, Asiatic Squadron
4 April 188920 February 1892
Succeeded by