George Blackburn (American football)

Last updated
George Blackburn
Biographical details
Born(1913-10-14)October 14, 1913
Columbus, Ohio
DiedMay 15, 2006(2006-05-15) (aged 92)
Dublin, Ohio
Playing career
c. 1935 Findlay
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1947 Miami (OH) (assistant)
1948 Miami (OH)
1949–1953 Cincinnati (assistant)
1954 Army (assistant)
1955–1960 Cincinnati
1964 Virginia (assistant)
1965–1970 Virginia
Head coaching record
Overall60–61–7
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
1 MAC (1948)
Awards
ACC Coach of the Year (1968)

George Edward "Blackie" Blackburn (October 14, 1913 – May 15, 2006) was an American football player, coach, and scout. He served as the head coach at Miami University (1948), the University of Cincinnati (1955–1960), and the University of Virginia (1965–1970), compiling a career college football record of 60–61–7. Blackburn was also an assistant coach under coaching legends Sid Gillman at Miami and Cincinnati and under Earl Blaik at the United States Military Academy.

Contents

Early life

A native of Columbus, Ohio, Blackburn graduated from Findlay College in 1936. At Findlay he played football and baseball.

Coaching career

Miami

As an assistant, Blackburn helped Sid Gillman lead the Miami Redskins to a victory over Texas Tech in the 1948 Sun Bowl. Blackburn was named head coach for the 1948 season after Gillman left. Blackburn stayed at Miami's head coach for one season guiding the team to 7–1–1 record and the 1948 Mid-American Conference championship. In 1949, Gillman took the head coaching position at the University of Cincinnati and Blackburn his assistant coach there. Woody Hayes succeeded Blackburn at Miami for the 1949 season.

Cincinnati

When Gillman left Cincinnati for the Los Angeles Rams for the 1955 season, Blackburn replaced him again. In his six years as the Bearcats' head coach. he compiled an overall record of 25–27–6.

Virginia

Blackburn was an assistant under Bill Elias for one season at the University of Virginia before being named head coach in 1965. During his six years as the Cavaliers' head coach, he compiled an overall record of 28–33. In 1968, he was named Atlantic Coast Conference Coach of the Year after leading the Cavaliers to a 7–3 record.

Scouting career

After leaving Virginia, Blackburn spent 17 years as a professional football scout with the New Orleans Saints, Houston Oilers, and New England Patriots of the National Football League (NFL).

Death

Blackburn died on May 15, 2006 in Dublin, Ohio. [1] [2]

Head coaching record

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Miami Redskins (Mid-American Conference)(1948)
1948 Miami 7–1–14–01st
Miami:7–1–14–0
Cincinnati Bearcats (NCAA University Division independent)(1955–1956)
1955 Cincinnati 1–6–2
1956 Cincinnati 4–5
Cincinnati Bearcats (Missouri Valley Conference)(1957–1960)
1957 Cincinnati 5–4–11–3–14th
1958 Cincinnati 6–2–21–2–22nd
1959 Cincinnati 5–4–10–3–15th
1960 Cincinnati 4–61–23rd
Cincinnati:25–27–63–10–4
Virginia Cavaliers (Atlantic Coast Conference)(1965–1970)
1965 Virginia 4–62–47th
1966 Virginia 4–63–3T–3rd
1967 Virginia 5–53–34th
1968 Virginia 7–33–23rd
1969 Virginia 3–71–58th
1970 Virginia 5–60–68th
Virginia:28–3312–23
Total:60–61–7
      National championship        Conference title        Conference division title or championship game berth

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References

  1. "Former Virginia Head Football Coach George Blackburn Dies". CBS Interactive. May 16, 2006. Retrieved February 25, 2014.
  2. "George Edward Blackburn Obituary". The Columbus Dispatch . Retrieved February 25, 2014.