George Chichester, 3rd Marquess of Donegall

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The Marquess of Donegall

George Chichester, 3rd Marquess of Donegall.jpg
Captain of the Yeomen of the Guard
In office
11 February 1848 21 February 1852
Monarch Victoria
Prime Minister Lord John Russell
Preceded by The Viscount Falkland
Succeeded by The Lord de Ros
Personal details
Born10 February 1797 (1797-02-10)
Great Cumberland Place, London
Died20 October 1883 (1883-10-21) (aged 86)
Brighton, Sussex
Nationality British
Political party Tory
Whig
Spouse(s)(1) Lady Harriet Butler
(d. 1860)
(2) Harriet Graham
(d. 1884)
Alma mater Christ Church, Oxford

George Hamilton Chichester, 3rd Marquess of Donegall KP GCH PC (10 February 1797 – 20 October 1883), styled Viscount Chichester until 1799 and Earl of Belfast between 1799 and 1844, was an Anglo-Irish landowner, courtier and politician. He served as Vice-Chamberlain of the Household from 1830 to 1834, as well as from 1838 to 1841, and as Captain of the Yeomen of the Guard between 1848 and 1852. Ennobled in his own right in 1841, he was also Lord Lieutenant of Antrim from 1841 to 1883 and was made a Knight of St Patrick in 1857.

Privy Council of the United Kingdom Formal body of advisers to the sovereign in the United Kingdom

Her Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council, usually known simply as the Privy Council of the United Kingdom or just the Privy Council, is a formal body of advisers to the Sovereign of the United Kingdom. Its membership mainly comprises senior politicians who are current or former members of either the House of Commons or the House of Lords.

Vice-Chamberlain of the Household position

The Vice-Chamberlain of the Household is a member of the Royal Household of the Sovereign of the United Kingdom. The office-holder is usually a junior government whip in the British House of Commons ranking third or fourth after the Chief Whip and the Deputy Chief Whip. He or she is the Deputy to the Lord Chamberlain of the Household. The Vice-Chamberlain's main roles are to compile a daily private report to the Sovereign on proceedings in the House of Commons and to relay addresses from the Commons to the Sovereign and back. As a member of the Royal Household, the Vice-Chamberlain accompanies the Sovereign and Royal Household at certain diplomatic and social events, particularly the annual garden party at Buckingham Palace. When the Sovereign goes in procession to Westminster for the State Opening of Parliament, the Vice-Chamberlain stays and is "held captive" at Buckingham Palace. This custom began with the Restoration (1660), because of the previous Vice-Chamberlain's role in the beheading of Charles I.

Captain of the Yeomen of the Guard

The Captain of the Queen's Bodyguard of the Yeomen of the Guard is a UK government post usually held by the Government Deputy Chief Whip in the House of Lords. The present Captain is Patrick Stopford, 9th Earl of Courtown, who was appointed to the position in the May ministry in July 2016.

Contents

Background and education

Lord Donegall was born at Great Cumberland Place, London, the eldest son of Viscount Chichester (who became The 2nd Marquess of Donegall in 1799) by his wife Anna May, daughter of Sir Edward May, 2nd Baronet. He was educated at Eton and Christ Church, Oxford, before serving for a time as a Captain with the 11th Hussars. He was known by the courtesy title Viscount Chichester from birth until 1799 and as Earl of Belfast from 1799 to 1844. [1]

London Capital of the United Kingdom

London is the capital and largest city of both England and the United Kingdom, as well as the largest city within the European Union. Standing on the River Thames in the south-east of England, at the head of its 50-mile (80 km) estuary leading to the North Sea, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. Londinium was founded by the Romans. The City of London, London's ancient core − an area of just 1.12 square miles (2.9 km2) and colloquially known as the Square Mile − retains boundaries that follow closely its medieval limits. The City of Westminster is also an Inner London borough holding city status. Greater London is governed by the Mayor of London and the London Assembly.

George Chichester, 2nd Marquess of Donegall Irish politician

George Augustus Chichester, 2nd Marquess of Donegall KP, PC (Ire), styled Viscount Chichester until 1791 and Earl of Belfast from 1791 to 1799, was an Anglo-Irish nobleman and politician.

Marquess of Donegall

Marquess of Donegall is a title in the Peerage of Ireland held by the head of the Chichester family, originally from Devon, England. Sir John Chichester sat as a Member of Parliament and was High Sheriff of Devon in 1557. One of his sons, Sir Arthur Chichester, was Lord Deputy of Ireland from 1604 to 1614. In 1613, he was raised to the Peerage of Ireland as Baron Chichester, of Belfast in County Antrim. He died childless in 1625 when the barony became extinct.

Political career

In 1818, the Earl of Belfast (as he was from 1799 until 1844) was elected to the House of Commons as Member of Parliament (MP) for Carrickfergus, [2] and two years later became representative for Belfast. [3] In July 1830 he was sworn of the Privy Council [4] and appointed Vice-Chamberlain of the Household in The Duke of Wellington's Tory administration. [5] In August he was returned to Parliament for Antrim. [6] He continued as Vice-Chamberlain after Lord Grey formed his Whig government in November 1830. In 1831 he was made a Knight Grand Cross of the Royal Guelphic Order. He remained as Vice-Chamberlain until 1834, the last months under the premiership of Lord Melbourne. [7] In 1837 he was once again returned to Parliament for Belfast. [3] He did not initially serve in Melbourne's second administration, but in 1838 he once again became Vice-Chamberlain of the Household. [8] He resigned when the government fell in 1841, [1] and during the same year he unsuccessfully contested Belfast as a Liberal candidate.[ citation needed ] He was instead raised to the Peerage of the United Kingdom in his own right as Baron Ennishowen and Carrickfergus, of Ennishowen in the County of Donegal and of Carrickfergus in the County of Antrim. [9] He sat in the House of Lords at Westminster for three years under this title before succeeding his father in the marquessate in 1844. [1]

An earl is a member of the nobility. The title is Anglo-Saxon in origin, akin to the Scandinavian form jarl, and meant "chieftain", particularly a chieftain set to rule a territory in a king's stead. In Scandinavia, it became obsolete in the Middle Ages and was replaced by duke (hertig/hertug/hertog). In later medieval Britain, it became the equivalent of the continental count. However, earlier in Scandinavia, jarl could also mean a sovereign prince. For example, the rulers of several of the petty kingdoms of Norway had the title of jarl and in many cases they had no less power than their neighbours who had the title of king. Alternative names for the rank equivalent to "earl/count" in the nobility structure are used in other countries, such as the hakushaku of the post-restoration Japanese Imperial era.

Belfast City in the United Kingdom, capital of Northern Ireland

Belfast is the capital and largest city of Northern Ireland, standing on the banks of the River Lagan on the east coast of Ireland. It is the largest city in Northern Ireland and second-largest on the island of Ireland, after Dublin. It had a population of 333,871 as of 2015.

Carrickfergus is a 19th-century United Kingdom Parliament constituency, in Northern Ireland, represented, between 1801 and 1885, by one MP.

Lord Donegall did not serve initially in Lord John Russell's first administration, but in 1848 he returned to the government as Captain of the Yeomen of the Guard. He resigned along with the rest of the Whig government in early 1852. Apart from his political career he was also Lord Lieutenant of Antrim from 1841 to 1883. [1] In 1857 he was made a Knight of the Order of St Patrick. [1] [10] At the time of his death in 1883 he was the senior member of the Privy Council.

John Russell, 1st Earl Russell Whig and Liberal British politician, Prime Minister on two occasions

John Russell, 1st Earl Russell,, known by his courtesy title Lord John Russell before 1861, was a leading Whig and Liberal politician who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom on two occasions during the early Victorian era.

A list of people who have served as Lord-Lieutenant of Antrim, located in Northern Ireland.

Order of St Patrick Dormant British order of chivalry associated with Ireland

The Most Illustrious Order of Saint Patrick is a dormant British order of chivalry associated with Ireland. The Order was created in 1783 by George III at the request of the then Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, The 3rd Earl Temple. The regular creation of knights of Saint Patrick lasted until 1922, when most of Ireland gained independence as the Irish Free State, a dominion within what was then known as the British Commonwealth of Nations. While the Order technically still exists, no knight of St Patrick has been created since 1936, and the last surviving knight, Prince Henry, Duke of Gloucester, died in 1974. The Queen, however, remains the Sovereign of the Order, and one officer, the Ulster King of Arms, also survives. St Patrick is patron of the order; its motto is Quis separabit?, Latin for "Who will separate [us]?": an allusion to the Vulgate translation of Romans 8:35, "Who shall separate us from the love of Christ?"

Family

Lord Donegall married Lady Harriet Anne Butler, daughter of Richard Butler, 1st Earl of Glengall, in 1822. They had three children:

Richard Butler, 1st Earl of Glengall, known as Lord Cahir before 1816, was an Irish peer.

Anthony Ashley-Cooper, 8th Earl of Shaftesbury Bt DL, styled Lord Ashley between 1851 and 1885, was a British peer. Ashley was the son of Anthony Ashley-Cooper, 7th Earl of Shaftesbury. He was commissioned a cornet in the Dorsetshire Yeomanry on 26 July 1856 and was promoted lieutenant on 21 January 1857. On 27 January 1857, he was appointed a deputy lieutenant of Dorset. He resigned his Yeomanry commission in April 1859. He was Member of Parliament for Hull from 1857 to 1859 and Cricklade from 1859 to 1865. He was a patron and member of the Society for the Suppression of the Opium Trade.

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Naples is the regional capital of Campania and the third-largest municipality in Italy after Rome and Milan. In 2017, around 967,069 people lived within the city's administrative limits while its province-level municipality has a population of 3,115,320 residents. Its continuously built-up metropolitan area is the second or third largest metropolitan area in Italy and one of the most densely populated cities in Europe.

After his first wife's death in September 1860, he married as his second wife Harriett Graham, daughter of Sir Bellingham Reginald Graham, 7th Baronet, and widow of Sir Frederick Ashworth, in 1862. There were no children from this marriage. Lord Donegall died in Brighton, Sussex, in October 1883, aged 86, and was buried in Belfast. [1] As both his sons had predeceased him, the larger part of the Donegall estates were inherited by his only daughter, Lady Harriet Augusta Anna Seymourina Chichester, wife of The 8th Earl of Shaftesbury.[ citation needed ] The barony of Ennishowen and Carrickfergus died with him, while he was succeeded in the marquessate by his younger brother, Lord Edward Chichester. The Marchioness of Donegall died in March 1884. [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 thepeerage.com Sir George Hamilton Chichester, 3rd Marquess of Donegall
  2. Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "C" (part 3)
  3. 1 2 Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "B" (part 2)
  4. "No. 18709". The London Gazette . 23 July 1830. p. 1533.
  5. "No. 18711". The London Gazette . 27 July 1830. p. 1580.
  6. Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "A" (part 2)
  7. "No. 19225". The London Gazette . 30 December 1834. p. 2348.
  8. "No. 19614". The London Gazette . 4 May 1838. p. 1025.
  9. "No. 20007". The London Gazette . 13 August 1841. p. 2072.
  10. leighrayment.com Knights of St Patrick
Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Arthur Chichester
Member of Parliament for Carrickfergus
1818–1820
Succeeded by
Sir Arthur Chichester, Bt
Preceded by
Arthur Chichester
Member of Parliament for Belfast
1820–1830
Succeeded by
Sir Arthur Chichester, Bt
Preceded by
Edmond Alexander McNaghten
Hon. John O'Neill
Member of Parliament for Antrim
1830–1837
With: Hon. John O'Neill
Succeeded by
John Irving
Hon. John O'Neill
Preceded by
James Emerson Tennent
George Dunbar
Member of Parliament for Belfast
1837–1838
With: James Gibson
Succeeded by
James Emerson Tennent
George Dunbar
Political offices
Preceded by
Sir Samuel Hulse
Vice-Chamberlain of the Household
1830–1834
Succeeded by
Viscount Castlereagh
Preceded by
Lord Charles FitzRoy
Vice-Chamberlain of the Household
1838–1841
Succeeded by
Lord Ernest Bruce
Preceded by
The Viscount Falkland
Captain of the Yeomen of the Guard
1848–1852
Succeeded by
The Lord de Ros
Honorary titles
Preceded by
The Earl O'Neill
Lord Lieutenant of Antrim
18411883
Succeeded by
The Lord Waveney
Preceded by
The Viscount Stratford de Redcliffe
Senior Privy Counsellor
1880–1883
Succeeded by
The Lord Ebury
Peerage of Ireland
Preceded by
George Augustus Chichester
Marquess of Donegall
1844–1883
Succeeded by
Edward Chichester
Peerage of the United Kingdom
New creation Baron Ennishowen and Carrickfergus
1841–1883
Extinct