George Day (Australian politician)

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George Day (29 October 1826 13 July 1906) was an Australian politician. He was born in the Hawkesbury River district of New South Wales on 29 October 1826.

He was elected from 1874 to 1880 as a member of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly, for the electoral district of Hume, and elected from 1880 to 1889 for the electoral district of Albury.

He then served from 1889 to 1906 in the New South Wales Legislative Council. [1]

He died at Petersham in Sydney on 13 July 1906. [2]

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References

  1. "Mr George Day (1826-1906)". Former Members of the Parliament of New South Wales . Retrieved 13 May 2019.
  2. Lea-Scarlett, E. J. "Day, George (1826 - 1906)". Australian Dictionary of Biography . Australian National University . Retrieved 20 August 2007.
New South Wales Legislative Assembly
Preceded by Member for Hume
1874 1880
Succeeded by
Preceded by
New Creation
Member for Albury
1880 1889
Succeeded by