George Dickson

Last updated

George Dickson
Born:(1921-09-27)September 27, 1921
Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.
Died:November 25, 2020(2020-11-25) (aged 99)
California, U.S.
Career information
Position(s) Quarterback
College Notre Dame
High school South Pasadena High School
Career history
As coach
1952 NYU (assistant)
1953 Mount Carmel HS (IL) (assistant)
1954 Notre Dame (backfield)
1955 Dayton (backfield)
1956 Marquette (backfield)
1957 USC (backfield)
1958–1960 Pacific (CA) (assistant)
1961 Oakland Raiders (DB)
1962–1963 Oklahoma (assistant)
1964–1965 Denver Broncos (assistant)
1966 Atlanta Falcons (OB)
1967–1968 New Orleans Saints (OB)
1969 Washington Redskins (OB)
1971 Houston Oilers (OB)
1972–1975 San Diego Chargers (OB/ST)
1976 Hamilton Tiger-Cats (head coach)
1977 San Bernardino Valley College (assistant)

George Charles Dickson Jr. (September 27, 1921 – November 25, 2020) was an American gridiron football player and coach was the head coach of the Hamilton Tiger-Cats of the Canadian Football League for the first two games of the 1976 season.

Contents

Early life

Dickson was born in September 1921 in Boston, Massachusetts and grew up in South Pasadena, California. He was a star quarterback at South Pasadena High School and in 1940 joined the Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team.

Military

After his freshman season, Dickson enlisted as a paratrooper. He saw extensive action during the war, including combat in Normandy on D-Day. Following the fighting in Normandy, Sgt. Dickson and his unit moved to the Ardennes. There, they were battered by constant bombing by German artillery during the Battle of the Bulge.

He returned to Notre Dame in 1946, but dropped out in order to work full-time. He returned to Notre Dame again in 1948 and spent his final two seasons of eligibility as a reserve quarterback behind Frank Tripucka and Bob Williams. [1]

Sgt. George Dickson received the Admiral Thomas J. Hamilton Award from the All-American Football Foundation in 2006.

Coaching career

Dickson began his coaching career in 1952 as an assistant at NYU. The football program was disbanded after his first season there and after spending the 1953 season as an assistant at Mount Carmel High School in Chicago, Dickson rejoined his NYU boss Hugh Devore at Dayton. Dickson's time at Dayton was short-lived as one month later he left Dayton to become the backfield coach at his alma mater, Notre Dame. [1] After only one season, Dickson left Notre Dame and returned to Dayton. [2]

After stints at Marquette, USC, Pacific, and Tulane, Dickson joined the pro ranks as an assistant with the Oakland Raiders of the American Football League. [3] He returned to college football in 1962 as an assistant at Oklahoma. [4]

In 1976, Dickson received his first head coaching position when he was hired by the CFL's Hamilton Tiger-Cats. After the Tiger-Cats lost all four of their preseason games and their first two regular season games under Dickson, General Manager Bob Shaw fired him and succeeded him as head coach. [5]

After his firing, Dickson served as an assistant coach at San Bernardino Valley College. [6]

Dickson died in California in November 2020 at the age of 99. [7]

Head coaching record

TeamYearRegular SeasonPost Season
WonLostTiesWin %FinishWonLostResult
HAM 1976020.0004th in East Division00Fired
Total020.00000

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References

  1. 1 2 "Grid Staff Fill at Notre Dame as Dickson Hired". The Spokesman-Review. February 14, 1954. Retrieved December 31, 2010.
  2. "Irish's Dickson Goes to Dayton". Los Angeles Times. August 24, 1955.
  3. "Oakland Raiders Fire Eddie Erdelatz". The Hartford Courant. September 19, 1961.
  4. AP (August 26, 1962). "Sports In Brief". Tri-City Herald. Retrieved December 31, 2010.
  5. Bob Hughes (January 20, 1977). "CFL coaching survivors honor Bob Shaw". The Leader-Post. Retrieved December 31, 2010.
  6. "Names in the News". Los Angeles Times. July 22, 1977.
  7. George Charles Dickson obituary