George Evans, 1st Baron Carbery

Last updated

George Evans, 1st Baron Carbery PC (Ire) (c. 1680 – 28 August 1749) was an Irish politician and peer. A member of a County Limerick family of Whigs, he entered the Irish House of Commons and was created a peer in 1715 as a reward for his father's support of the Hanoverian succession, after his father declined the offer. At the same time, he was returned to the British House of Commons for Westbury. He contested control of the borough with the Tories led by the Earl of Abingdon until 1727, when he stood down.

Evans was the son of George Evans (1655 – May 1720), of Bulgaden Hall, County Limerick and his wife (m. 1679) Mary (née Eyre). Lord Carbery married Anne, daughter of William Stafford, in 1703. She later inherited Laxton Hall from her brother. They had five children: [1]

After the death of Charles Oliver, one of the members for Limerick County in the Irish House of Commons, Evans was elected to succeed him in 1707. He sat as a Whig for the county until 1714. On 12 November 1714, he was appointed governor and constable of Limerick Castle. Evans's father had earlier been a strong supporter of William and Mary but declined King George I's offer of a peerage. However, the peerage was accepted by his son, who on 15 March 1714/5 was raised to the Peerage of Ireland as Baron Carbery, of Carbery in the County of Cork, with remainder to the male issue of his father.

With the sponsorship of Lord Cowper and other Whigs, Evans and Charles Allanson stood at Westbury at the 1715 election to challenge the Tory interest of Lord Abingdon. [2] The election was held on 25 January 1714/5, and a double return was made: the Tory candidates, Lord Abingdon's nephew Willoughby Bertie and Francis Annesley were returned by the mayor of Abingdon, while the constable returned Evans and Allanson. As the former pair had polled 29 and 28 votes, respectively, to the 19 and 18 of Evans and Allanson, the House of Commons declared the Tories elected on 28 March 1714/1715.

Lord Carbery, as Evans now was, and Allanson lodged an election petition with the House, [3] arguing that many of the Tory voters were not entitled to the franchise, and there were allegations of bribery on both sides. The committee ultimately declared that Bertie and Annesley had not been duly elected and that Carbery and Allanson had been; [4] the Whig-dominated House [5] concurred with the findings of the committee, and resolved that the more narrow interpretation of the Westbury franchise was the correct one. [4] On 18 November 1715, Carbery was admitted to the Irish Privy Council.

Carbery voted in favor of Whig project such as the Septennial Act 1716 and the unsuccessful Peerage Bill in December 1719, but was not present for the vote on the Religious Worship Act 1718 in January 1718/9, which repealed the Occasional Conformity Act 1711 and Schism Act 1714. [2] In the 1722 election, Carbery and Thomas Bennett stood against James Bertie (brother of Lord Abingdon) and Annesley; the Tory candidates were returned by the mayor. Carbery and Bennett again petitioned against the result, alleging undue practices and that they had received a majority of the votes. [6] Although the results of the election were in their favor, [2] they were unable to produce the original copy of the poll, and their petition was dismissed on 25 February 1723/4. [6] Bertie had also been returned for Middlesex and chose to sit for that constituency; in the ensuing by-election at Westbury in 1724, Carbery defeated Edward Conway and returned to Parliament. He did not stand at the 1727 election. [3]

Carbery's appointment as governor and constable of Limerick Castle was renewed in 1740. He died on 28 August 1749 [2] and was succeeded by his son George. Lady Carbery died in 1757.

Notes

  1. The Irish Compendium (5th ed.). London: J. Knapton. 1756. p. 501.
  2. 1 2 3 4 Lea, R. S. (1970). "EVANS, George, 1st Baron Carbery [I] (c.1680-1749), of Caharas, co. Limerick, and Laxton, Northants.". In Sedgwick, Romney (ed.). The House of Commons 1715-1754. The History of Parliament Trust.
  3. 1 2 Lea, R. S. (1970). "Westbury". In Sedgwick, Romney (ed.). The House of Commons 1715-1754. The History of Parliament Trust.
  4. 1 2 Journals of the House of Commons. Vol. 18. 1803. pp. 149–154.
  5. Hanham, Andrew A. (1970). "1715". In Sedgwick, Romney (ed.). The House of Commons 1715-1754. The History of Parliament Trust.
  6. 1 2 Journals of the House of Commons. Vol. 20. 1803. p. 273.

Related Research Articles

Baron Carbery

Baron Carbery, of Carbery in the County of Cork, is a title in the Peerage of Ireland. It was created in 1715 for George Evans, with remainder to the heirs male of his father and namesake George Evans, a supporter of William and Mary during the Glorious Revolution, who had earlier declined the offer of a peerage. After his elevation to the peerage Lord Carbery represented Westbury in the House of Commons. He was succeeded by his eldest son, the second Baron. He also sat as Member of Parliament for Westbury. His grandson, the fourth Baron, briefly represented Rutland in Parliament. He was succeeded by his uncle, the fifth Baron. On his death the line of the eldest son of the first Baron failed. He was succeeded by his first cousin once removed, the sixth Baron, who had previously succeeded his father as second Baronet, of Castle Freke. Lord Carbery sat in the House of Lords as an Irish Representative Peer from 1824 to 1845. His nephew, the eighth Baron, was an Irish Representative Peer from 1891 to 1894. As of 2014 the titles are held by the latter's great-great-grandson, the twelfth Baron, who succeeded his father in 2012.

Thomas Pitt, 1st Earl of Londonderry British politician and soldier

Thomas Innes Pitt, 1st Earl of Londonderry was a British Army officer, speculator and Whig politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1713 to 1728. He served as Governor of the Leeward Islands from 1728 to his death in 1729.

Charles Powlett, 3rd Duke of Bolton

Charles Powlett, 3rd Duke of Bolton, styled Earl of Wiltshire from 1685 until 1699, and Marquess of Winchester from 1699 until 1722, was a British Whig politician who sat in the English House of Commons from 1705 to 1708 and in the British House of Commons between 1708 and 1717 when he was raised to the peerage as Lord Powlett and sat in the House of Lords.

John Morton (MP)

John Morton was an English lawyer and Tory politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1747 to 1780.

Willoughby Bertie, 3rd Earl of Abingdon, of Wytham Abbey, Berkshire and Rycote, Oxfordshire, was an English landowner and Tory politician who sat briefly in the House of Commons in 1715.

Henry Bertie, JP, of Chesterton, Oxfordshire was an English soldier and Tory politician who sat in the English and British House of Commons between 1678 and 1715.

Charles Bertie (died 1730)

Charles Bertie of Uffington, near Stamford, Lincolnshire was a British politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1711 to 1727.

James Bertie, 1st Earl of Abingdon English nobleman

James Bertie, 1st Earl of Abingdon, styled Hon. James Bertie until 1657 and known as the 5th Baron Norreys from 1657 until 1682, was an English nobleman.

Montagu Venables-Bertie, 2nd Earl of Abingdon PC, styled Hon. Montagu Bertie until 1682 and Lord Norreys from 1682 to 1699, was an English nobleman.

Henry Pelham (of Stanmer) British politician

Henry Pelham was a British landowner and politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1715 to 1725.

Richard Romney Sedgwick was a British historian, civil servant and diplomat. He was the elder son of Professor Adam Sedgwick, 1854–1913, and Laura Helen Elizabeth Robinson. He married Mana St David Hodson, daughter of Professor T.C.Hodson, in 1936; they had one son and one daughter.

Mildmay Fane

Mildmay Fane was a British politician who sat in the House of Commons for 8 months in 1715, before his early death.

Humphry Morice (Governor of the Bank of England)

Humphry Morice was a British merchant, MP, Governor of the Bank of England who was involved in the Atlantic slave trade. He inherited his father's trading business around the age of eighteen, and learned finance and speculation from an uncle. Placed in Parliament through a cousin's interest in 1713, his Whig politics ultimately provoked a breach with his Tory cousin, and he had to be given another seat in 1722 by Robert Walpole's administration. He rose to be Deputy Governor and then Governor of the Bank of England in 1727, but unknown to his contemporaries, his fortune was largely fictitious and he was embezzling from the Bank and his daughters' trust fund. He died suddenly in 1731, perhaps having poisoned himself to forestall the discovery of his frauds, and left behind enormous debts.

Richard Bulkeley, 4th Viscount Bulkeley, of Baron Hill, Anglesey, was a Welsh Tory politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1704 and 1724. He was extremely hot-tempered and was involved in several personal and family disputes with local Whig leaders.

James Bertie of Stanwell and Westminster, Middlesex, was a British Tory politician who sat in the English and British House of Commons for 34 years between 1695 and 1734.

Peregrine Bertie was a Tory Member of Parliament. Member of a junior branch of the Bertie family seated at his mother's estate of Low Leyton, Essex, he was returned for Westbury from 1753 to 1774 by the senior branch of the family, the Earls of Abingdon, where he was in continuous opposition to the successive Whig administrations.

Norreys Bertie was an English Tory politician. From a junior branch of the Bertie family which had inherited estates at Weston-on-the-Green in Oxfordshire, he represented that county in Parliament from 1743 until standing down before the bitterly contested 1754 election. He was unfriendly to the Hanoverian succession and sat in opposition to the government.

George Evans, 2nd Baron Carbery, known until 1749 as Hon. George Evans, was a British politician. Like his father, he represented Westbury as a Whig. Evans entered the British House of Commons in 1734 as a supporter of the Walpole administration. He was in financial difficulties by 1743, and did not stand for election again in 1747. Succeeding his father as an Irish peer in 1749, he sat in the Irish House of Lords until his death a decade later.

Francis Annesley, FRS was an Irish lawyer and politician who sat in the Irish House of Commons between 1692 and 1714, in the English House of Commons from 1705 to 1708 and in the British House of Commons between 1708 and 1734.

Lewis Watson, 1st Baron Sondes, called Hon. Lewis Monson before 1746 and Hon. Lewis Watson from 1746 to 1760, was a British Whig politician and peer.

References

Parliament of Ireland
Preceded by Member of Parliament for Limerick County
1707–1714
With: Sir Thomas Southwell 1707–1713
George King 1713–1714
Succeeded by
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by Member of Parliament for Westbury
17151722
With: Charles Allanson
Succeeded by
Preceded by Member of Parliament for Westbury
1724–1727
With: Francis Annesley
Succeeded by
Peerage of Ireland
New creation Baron Carbery
1715–1749
Succeeded by