George Innes (bishop)

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The Right Reverend

George Innes
Bishop of Brechin
Church Scottish Episcopal Church
Diocese Brechin
In office1778-1781
Predecessor James Rait
Successor Abernethy Drummond
Orders
Consecration13 August 1778
by  William Falconer
Personal details
Born1717
Died18 May 1781
Denomination Anglican
Styles of
George Innes
Mitre plain 2.png
Reference style The Right Reverend
Spoken styleMy Lord or Bishop

George Innes (1717–1781) was an Anglican clergyman who served in the Scottish Episcopal Church as the Bishop of Brechin from 1778 to 1781. [1]

Anglicanism The practices, liturgy and identity of the Church of England

Anglicanism is a Western Christian tradition which has developed from the practices, liturgy, and identity of the Church of England following the English Reformation.

The seven dioceses of the Scottish Episcopal Church make up the ecclesiastical province of the Anglican Communion in Scotland. The church has, since the 18th century, held an identity distinct from that of the Presbyterian-aligned Church of Scotland.

Bishop of Brechin Wikimedia list article

The Bishop of Brechin is the ecclesiastical head of the Diocese of Brechin or Angus, based at Dundee. Brechin Cathedral, Brechin is a parish church of the established (presbyterian) Church of Scotland. The diocese had a long-established Gaelic monastic community which survived into the 13th century. The clerical establishment may very well have traced their earlier origins from Abernethy. During the Scottish Reformation, the Presbyterian Church of Scotland gained control of the heritage and jurisdiction of the bishopric. However, the line of bishops has continued to this day, according to ancient models of consecration, in the Scottish Episcopal Church.

He was consecrated the Bishop of the Diocese of Brechin on 13 August 1778 at Edinburgh by Primus Falconer and bishops Rose and Petrie. [1]

Consecration is the solemn dedication to a special purpose or service, usually religious. The word consecration literally means "association with the sacred". Persons, places, or things can be consecrated, and the term is used in various ways by different groups. The origin of the word comes from the Latin stem consecrat, which means dedicated, devoted, and sacred. A synonym for to consecrate is to sanctify; a distinct antonym is to desecrate.

Diocese of Brechin (Episcopal) diocese

The Diocese of Brechin is in the east of Scotland, and is the smallest of the seven dioceses of the Scottish Episcopal Church. It covers the historic counties of Angus and Kincardineshire. It stretches from Muchalls in the north east down to Dundee in the south, and across to Glencarse in the south west. The cathedral and administrative centre is St Paul’s Cathedral in Dundee. The diocese continues to be named after its mediaeval centre of Brechin.

Edinburgh Capital city in Scotland

Edinburgh is the capital of Scotland and one of its 32 council areas. Historically part of the county of Midlothian, it is located in Lothian on the Firth of Forth's southern shore.

He died in office on 18 May 1781, aged 61. [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 3 Bertie, David M. (2000). Scottish Episcopal Clergy, 1689-2000. Edinburgh: T & T Clark. p. 67. ISBN   0567087468.
Scottish Episcopal Church titles
Preceded by
James Rait
Bishop of Brechin
1778–1781
Succeeded by
Abernethy Drummond