George Meehan

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George Benjamin Meehan Jr.
Born(1891-07-19)July 19, 1891
DiedFebruary 10, 1947(1947-02-10) (aged 55)
Occupation

George Benjamin Meehan Jr. (1891–1947) was the cinematographer of more than 150 American films.

Contents

Life

Meehan was born on July 19, 1891, in Brooklyn, New York. During World War I he was a cinematographer in the United States Army. He married Louise Harriett Mahoney.

Meehan was the cinematographer for Mary of the Movies (1923), [1] Ben Hur: A Tale of the Christ (1925), [2] The Ghost Talks (1929), [3] Back to the Woods (1937), [4] The Big Chance (1933), Inside Information (1934), Tarzan’s Revenge (1938), Riders of Black River (1939), The Wildcat of Tucson (1940), Beyond the Sacramento (1940), and Voice of the Whistler (1945). [5]

Death

Meehan was working on King of the Wild Horses when he became ill and was replaced on the project by Philip Tannura. Meehan died on February 10, 1947, [6] in Hollywood, California, [7] and was buried in the Forest Lawn Memorial Park of Glendale, California.

Selected filmography

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