George Saimes

Last updated

George Saimes
George Saimes.jpg
No. 24, 26
Position: Safety
Personal information
Born:(1941-09-01)September 1, 1941
Canton, Ohio
Died:March 8, 2013(2013-03-08) (aged 71)
Canton, Ohio
Height:5 ft 11 in (1.80 m)
Weight:186 lb (84 kg)
Career information
College: Michigan State
NFL Draft: 1963  / Round: 6 / Pick: 71
(By the Los Angeles Rams)
AFL draft: 1963  / Round: 6 / Pick: 48
(By the Kansas City Chiefs)
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played - started:121 - 24
Interceptions:22
Fumble recoveries - for TDs:4 - 1
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

George Thomas Saimes (September 1, 1941 – March 8, 2013) was an American football defensive back and fullback for Michigan State University and the Buffalo Bills of the American Football League, which produced American Football League Championships in 1964 and 1965.

Saimes was born and died in Canton, Ohio. In 1964, he had a career-high six interceptions and earned the first of his five American Football League All-Star Game appearances. He made The Sporting News All-AFL Team in 1964, 1965 and 1967. Former Pro Football writer and president of the Pro Football Writers Association, Larry Felser, calls Saimes "the finest open-field tackler in the league."

He achieved All-American Football League honors five times, and is a member of the American Football League All-Time Team, the Buffalo Bills' Wall of Fame, and the Greater Buffalo Sports Hall of Fame.

Saimes went on to be a professional football scout with the Blesto V Combine, the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, the Washington Redskins, and the Houston Texans. Saimes died in Canton of leukemia on March 8, 2013. [1]

See also

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