George Thynne, 2nd Baron Carteret

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The Lord Carteret

PC
Comptroller of the Household
In office
1804–1812
Monarch George III
Prime Minister Hon. William Pitt the Younger
The Lord Grenville
The Duke of Portland
Hon. Spencer Perceval
Preceded by Lord Charles Somerset
Succeeded by Lord George Beresford
Personal details
Born23 January 1770 (1770-01-23)
Died19 February 1838 (1838-02-20) (aged 68)
Dalkeith Palace, Midlothian
Nationality British
Political party Tory
Spouse(s)Hon. Harriet Courtenay
(1771–1836)
Alma mater St John's College, Cambridge.

George Thynne, 2nd Baron Carteret PC (23 January 1770 – 19 February 1838), styled Lord George Thynne between 1789 and 1826, was a British Tory politician.

Contents

Background and education

Carteret was the second son of Thomas Thynne, 1st Marquess of Bath by his wife Lady Elizabeth Bentinck, a daughter of William Bentinck, 2nd Duke of Portland. In 1784 his uncle Henry Carteret, 1st Baron Carteret (born Henry Thynne) was created Baron Carteret (the second creation of that title, previously held by his own childless maternal uncle Robert Carteret, 3rd Earl Granville, 3rd Baron Carteret (1721–1776)) with special remainder to the younger sons of his elder brother, the 1st Marquess of Bath. He was educated at St John's College, Cambridge. [1]

Thomas Thynne, 1st Marquess of Bath 18th-century English noble

Thomas Thynne, 1st Marquess of Bath, KG, PC, of Longleat in Wiltshire, was a British politician who held office under King George III. He served as Southern Secretary, Northern Secretary and Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. Between 1751 and 1789, he was known as the 3rd Viscount Weymouth. He is possibly best known for his role in the Falklands Crisis of 1770.

Elizabeth Thynne, Marchioness of Bath, née Lady Elizabeth Bentinck, was a British courtier and the wife of Thomas Thynne, 1st Marquess of Bath. From 1761 to 1793, she was a Lady of the Bedchamber to Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, queen consort of King George III of the United Kingdom. In 1793, as Dowager Marchioness, she became Mistress of the Robes and held that position until the queen's death in 1818.

William Bentinck, 2nd Duke of Portland English peer

William Bentinck, 2nd Duke of Portland, styled Viscount Woodstock from 1709 to 1716 and Marquess of Titchfield from 1716 to 1726, was a British peer and politician.

Political career

Carteret was elected Member of Parliament for Weobly in 1790, a seat he held until 1812, and served as a Lord of the Treasury from 1801 to 1804. In 1804 he was admitted to the Privy Council and appointed Comptroller of the Household, a post he held until 1812. In 1826 he succeeded his uncle as second Baron Carteret according to the special remainder and took his seat in the House of Lords.

The Comptroller of the Household is an ancient position in the British royal household, nominally the second-ranking member of the Lord Steward's department after the Treasurer of the Household. The Comptroller was an ex officio member of the Board of Green Cloth, until that body was abolished in the reform of the local government licensing in 2004. In recent times, a senior government whip has invariably occupied the office. On state occasions the Comptroller carries a white staff of office, as often seen in portraits.

House of Lords upper house in the Parliament of the United Kingdom

The House of Lords, also known as the House of Peers, is the upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Membership is granted by appointment or else by heredity or official function. Like the House of Commons, it meets in the Palace of Westminster. Officially, the full name of the house is the Right Honourable the Lords Spiritual and Temporal of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in Parliament assembled.

Marriage

In 1797 Lord Carteret married the Hon. Harriet Courtenay (1772–1836), daughter of William Courtenay, 2nd Viscount Courtenay. They had no children. She died in April 1836, aged 64.

William Courtenay, 2nd Viscount Courtenay british noble

William Courtenay, 8th Earl de jure of Devon was the eldest son of William Courtenay 7th de jure Earl of Devon, and Lady Frances Finch.

Death and succession

Lord Carteret survived his wife by two years and died at Dalkeith Palace, Midlothian, in February 1838, aged 68. He was succeeded in the barony by his younger brother, John Thynne, 3rd Baron Carteret.

Dalkeith Palace historic house in Dalkeith, Midlothian, Scotland

Dalkeith Palace in Dalkeith, Midlothian, Scotland, is a historic house and the former seat of the Duke of Buccleuch. The present house was built in 1702 on the site of an earlier castle.

Midlothian Council area of Scotland

Midlothian is a historic county, registration county, lieutenancy area and one of 32 council areas of Scotland used for local government. Midlothian lies in the east-central Lowlands, bordering the City of Edinburgh, East Lothian and the Scottish Borders.

John Thynne, 3rd Baron Carteret PC, known as Lord John Thynne between 1789 and 1838, was a British peer and politician.

Related Research Articles

Marquess of Bath title in the Peerage of Great Britain

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References

  1. "Thynne, The Hon. George (THN789G)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge.
  2. Burke, Sir Bernard, (1938 ed) Burke's Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage. Shaw, London. p. 243
  3. 1 2 3 Woodfall, H. (1768). The Peerage of England; Containing a Genealogical and Historical Account of All the Peers of that Kingdom Etc. Fourth Edition, Carefully Corrected, and Continued to the Present Time, Volume 6. p. 258.
  4. 1 2 Lee, Sidney; Edwards, A. S. G. (revised) (2004). "Thynne, William (d. 1546)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/27426.(Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  5. Girouard, Mark, Thynne, Sir John (1515–1580), estate manager and builder of Longleat in Oxford Dictionary of Biography (Oxford University Press, 2004)
  6. Booth, Muriel. "Thynne, John (?1550–1604), of Longleat, Wilts". History of Parliament. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  7. Lancaster, Henry; Thrush, Andrew. "Thynne, Charles (c.1568–1652), of Cheddar, Som". History of Parliament. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  8. Pugh, R. B.; Crittall, Elizabeth, eds. (1957). "Parliamentary history: 1529–1629". A History of the County of Wiltshire: Volume 5. British History Online. London: Victoria County History.
  9. Ferris, John P. "Thynne, Sir James (c.1605-70), of Longbridge Deverill, Wilts". History of Parliament. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  10. Helms, M. W.; Ferris, John P. "Thynne, Sir Thomas (c.1610–c.69), of Richmond, Surr". History of Parliament. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  11. Marshall, Alan (2008) [2004]. "Thynne, Thomas [nicknamed Tom of Ten Thousand] (1647/8–1682)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/27423.(Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  12. Heath-Caldwell, J. J. "Thomas Thynne, 1st Marquess of Bath, 3rd Viscount Weymouth". JJ Heath-Caldwell. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  13. Hayton, D. W. "Thynne, Hon. Henry (1675-1708)". The History of Parliament. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  14. Dunaway, Stewart (2013). Lord John Carteret, Earl Granville: His Life History and the Granville Grants. Lulu. p. 33. ISBN   9781300878070.
  15. "Bath, Thomas Thynne". Encyclopedia Britannica 1911. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  16. Thorne, Roland. "Carteret [formerly Thynne], Henry Frederick". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  17. "Thomas Thynne, 2nd Marquess of Bath (1765–1837)". National Portrait Gallery. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  18. Escott, Margaret. "Thynne, Lord Henry Frederick (1797-1837), of 6 Grovesnor Square, Mdx". History of Parliament. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  19. "John Thynne, 4th Marquess of Bath (1831-1896), Diplomat and landowner". National Portrait Gallery. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
John Scott
Viscount Weymouth
Member of Parliament for Weobly
17901801
With: John Scott 17901796
Lord John Thynne 1796
Inigo Freeman Thomas 17961800
Sir Charles Talbot, Bt 18001801
Succeeded by
Parliament of the United Kingdom
Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Parliament of Great Britain
Member of Parliament for Weobly
18011812
With: Sir Charles Talbot, Bt 18011802
Robert Steele 18021807
Lord Guernsey 18071812
Lord Apsley 1812
Succeeded by
Viscount St Asaph
William Bathurst
Political offices
Preceded by
Lord Charles Somerset
Comptroller of the Household
18041812
Succeeded by
Lord George Beresford
Peerage of Great Britain
Preceded by
Henry Frederick Carteret
Baron Carteret
18261838
Succeeded by
John Thynne