George Trevelyan (priest)

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George Trevelyan (17 December 1765 – 13 October 1827) was an Anglican priest in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. [1]

Trevelyan was the son of Sir John Trevelyan Bt MP . He was educated at St Alban Hall, Oxford, matriculating in 1789, graduating BCL in 1797, and was ordained in 1797. [2] He held livings at Nettlecombe, Somerset, Treborough and Huish Champflower. He was Archdeacon of Bath from 1815 to 1817; [3] and Archdeacon of Taunton from then until his death. [4]

Notes

  1. UCL archives
  2. Foster, Joseph (1888–1892). "Trevelyan, George (1)"  . Alumni Oxonienses: the Members of the University of Oxford, 1715–1886 . Oxford: Parker and Co via Wikisource.
  3. "Fasti Ecclesiae Anglicanae 1541-1857": Volume 5, Pages 18-20, Bath and Wells Diocese Institute of Historical Research, London, 1979
  4. "Fasti Ecclesiae Anglicanae 1541-1857": Volume 5, Pages 16-18, Bath and Wells Diocese Institute of Historical Research, London, 1979


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