George Wardrope

Last updated
George Wardrope
Ontario MPP
In office
1951–1967
Preceded by Fred Robinson
Succeeded by Ron Knight
Constituency Port Arthur
Personal details
Born(1899-11-02)November 2, 1899
Montreal, Quebec
Died January 1, 1980(1980-01-01) (aged 80)
Thunder Bay, Ontario
Political party Progressive Conservative
Spouse(s) Blanche Mabel Senbolt
Occupation Insurance broker

George Calvin Wardrope (November 2, 1899 – January 1, 1980) was a politician in Ontario, Canada. He served as a Progressive Conservative member of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario from 1951 to 1967. He was a member of cabinet in the governments of Leslie Frost and John Robarts.

Ontario Province of Canada

Ontario is one of the 13 provinces and territories of Canada and is located in east-central Canada. It is Canada's most populous province accounting for 38.3 percent of the country's population, and is the second-largest province in total area. Ontario is fourth-largest jurisdiction in total area when the territories of the Northwest Territories and Nunavut are included. It is home to the nation's capital city, Ottawa, and the nation's most populous city, Toronto, which is also Ontario's provincial capital.

Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario political party in Ontario, Canada

The Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario, often shortened to Ontario PC Party, PC, or Conservatives, is a centre-right political party in Ontario, Canada. The party has been led by Premier Doug Ford since March 10, 2018.

Legislative Assembly of Ontario single house of Legislature of Ontario

The Legislative Assembly of Ontario is one of two components of the Legislature of Ontario, the other being the Lieutenant Governor of Ontario. The Legislative Assembly is the second largest Canadian provincial deliberative assembly by number of members after the National Assembly of Quebec. The Assembly meets at the Ontario Legislative Building at Queen's Park in the provincial capital of Toronto.

Contents

Background

He was born in Montreal, the son of John W. Wardrope and educated at the University of Toronto. Wardrope operated an insurance and real estate agency in Port Arthur. He was also president of the Steep Rock Lumber Company and served on the city council for Port Arthur. In 1947, he married Blanche Mabel Senbolt. [1] [2]

Montreal City in Quebec, Canada

Montreal is the most populous municipality in the Canadian province of Quebec and the second-most populous municipality in Canada. Originally called Ville-Marie, or "City of Mary", it is named after Mount Royal, the triple-peaked hill in the heart of the city. The city is centred on the Island of Montreal, which took its name from the same source as the city, and a few much smaller peripheral islands, the largest of which is Île Bizard. It has a distinct four-season continental climate with warm to hot summers and cold, snowy winters.

University of Toronto university in Toronto, Ontario, Canada

The University of Toronto is a public research university in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, located on the grounds that surround Queen's Park. It was founded by royal charter in 1827 as King's College, the first institution of higher learning in the colony of Upper Canada. Originally controlled by the Church of England, the university assumed the present name in 1850 upon becoming a secular institution. As a collegiate university, it comprises eleven colleges, which differ in character and history, each with substantial autonomy on financial and institutional affairs. It has two satellite campuses in Scarborough and Mississauga.

Port Arthur was a city in Northern Ontario, Canada, located on Lake Superior. In January 1970 it amalgamated with Fort William and the townships of Neebing and McIntyre to form the city of Thunder Bay.

Politics

Wardrope was an unsuccessful candidate for the federal seat in 1935 and the provincial seat in 1948. [3] He was elected to the Legislative Assembly of Ontario as a Progressive Conservative for the northern Ontario riding of Port Arthur in the 1951 provincial election. [4] In December 1958, he was appointed to cabinet as Minister of Reform Institutions. [5]

Port Arthur was a federal electoral district represented in the House of Commons of Canada from 1935 to 1979. It was located in the province of Ontario. This riding was created in 1933 from parts of Port Arthur—Thunder Bay riding.

Electoral district (Canada) federal or provincial electoral district in Canada

An electoral district in Canada, also known as a "constituency" or a "riding", is a geographical constituency upon which Canada's representative democracy is based. It is officially known in Canadian French as a circonscription, but frequently called a comté (county).

He was a candidate in the 1961 Progressive Conservative leadership convention, placing last with 45 votes. He was subsequently appointed to the Cabinet by the new Premier of Ontario, John Robarts as Minister of Mines. [6] He held this position until he was defeated in the 1967 election by radio broadcaster Ron Knight. Knight defeated him by 815 votes. [7]

Cabinet (government) group of high ranking officials, usually representing the executive branch of government

A Cabinet is a body of high-ranking state officials, typically consisting of the top leaders of the executive branch. Members of a cabinet are usually called Cabinet ministers or secretaries. The function of a Cabinet varies: in some countries it is a collegiate decision-making body with collective responsibility, while in others it may function either as a purely advisory body or an assisting institution to a decision making head of state or head of government. Cabinets are typically the body responsible for the day-to-day management of the government and response to sudden events, whereas the legislative and judicial branches work in a measured pace, in sessions according to lengthy procedures.

Premier of Ontario first minister of the government of Ontario

The Premier of Ontario is the first minister of the Crown for the Canadian province of Ontario and the province’s head of government. The position was formerly styled "Prime Minister of Ontario" until the ministry of Bill Davis formally changed the title to premier.

Wardrope attempted to win a seat in the House of Commons of Canada in the 1968 federal election, but was defeated in the riding of Thunder Bay. He placed third behind Liberal Keith Penner and the New Democratic Party candidate. [8]

House of Commons of Canada lower house of the Parliament of Canada

The House of Commons of Canada is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the Sovereign and the Senate. The House of Commons currently meets in a temporary Commons chamber in the West Block of the parliament buildings on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, while the Centre Block, which houses the traditional Commons chamber, undergoes a ten-year renovation.

Thunder Bay was a federal electoral district in the northwestern part of the province of Ontario, Canada, that was represented in the House of Commons of Canada from 1968 to 1979.

In 1969 he was elected to serve on the first City Council of the new city of Thunder Bay, which took office on January 1, 1970. [9]

Cabinet positions

Ontario Provincial Government of John Robarts
Cabinet post (1)
PredecessorOfficeSuccessor
James Maloney Minister of Mines
1961–1967
Allan Lawrence
Ontario Provincial Government of Leslie Frost
Cabinet post (1)
PredecessorOfficeSuccessor
Matthew Dymond Minister of Reform Institutions
1958–1961
Irwin Haskett

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References

  1. Canadian Who's Who. 1966. pp. 1132–3.
  2. Pierre Normandin (1956). Canadian Parliamentary Guide, 1952.
  3. Canadian Press (June 6, 1948). "How Ontario Electors Voted in all 90 Ridings". The Toronto Daily Star. Toronto. p. 24.
  4. Canadian Press (November 22, 1951). "Complete Ontario Vote". The Montreal Gazette. Montreal. p. 4. Retrieved 2014-03-22.
  5. "Premier Frost's New Team". The Globe and Mail. December 23, 1958. p. 6.
  6. "Haskett, MacNaughton Join Cabinet Ranks". The Globe and Mail. November 9, 1961. p. 29.
  7. Canadian Press (October 18, 1967). "Tories win, but..." The Windsor Star. Windsor, Ontario. p. B2.
  8. "Results from parliamentary constituencies across the country, riding by riding". The Globe and Mail. June 26, 1968. pp. 10–11.
  9. F. Brent Scollie (2000). Thunder Bay Mayors and Councillors 1873-1945. Thunder Bay, Ont: Thunder Bay Historical Museum Society. pp. 146–147.