George Washington Woodruff

Last updated
George Washington Woodruff
George W. Woodruff.jpg
Biographical details
Born(1864-02-22)February 22, 1864
Dimock, Pennsylvania
DiedMarch 24, 1934(1934-03-24) (aged 70)
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania
Playing career
1885–1888 Yale
Position(s) Guard
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1892–1901 Penn
1903 Illinois
1905 Carlisle Indian
Head coaching record
Overall142–25–2
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
3 National (1894–1895, 1897)
College Football Hall of Fame
Inducted in 1963 (profile)
George Washington Woodruff
Attorney General of Pennsylvania
In office
January 20, 1923 January 18, 1927
Governor Gifford Pinchot
Preceded by George Alter
Succeeded by Thomas Baldrige
Personal details
Political party Republican

George Washington Woodruff (February 22, 1864 – March 24, 1934) was an American football player, rower, coach, teacher, lawyer and politician. He served as the head football coach at the University of Pennsylvania (1892–1901), the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign (1903), and Carlisle Indian Industrial School (1905), compiling a career college football record of 142–25–2. Woodruff's Penn teams of 1894, 1895, and 1897 have been recognized as national champions. Woodruff was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1963.

Contents

Playing career and education

Penn, 1898 George Washington Woodruff 1898.jpg
Penn, 1898

Woodruff graduated from Yale University in 1889, where he was a member of Skull and Bones, [1] [2] :65 and the University of Pennsylvania where he earned his LL.B. law degree in 1895. His football teammates at Yale included Amos Alonzo Stagg, Pudge Heffelfinger, and Pa Corbin.

Coaching career

At Penn, Woodruff coached Truxtun Hare, Carl Sheldon Williams, John H. Outland, his brother Wylie G. Woodruff, and Charles Gelbert. In his ten years of coaching at Penn, Woodruff compiled a 124–15–2 record while his teams scored 1777 points and only gave up 88. He also coached one year each at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign and Carlisle Indian Industrial School.

Political career

After coaching, Woodruff practiced law and was active in politics as a Republican. His political posts included Finance Clerk in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Attorney General, federal judge for the territory of Hawaii, chief law officer of the US Forest Service under friend and fellow Yale alumni Gifford Pinchot, Acting Secretary of the Interior under President Theodore Roosevelt. [3]

Head coaching record

Football

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Penn Quakers (Independent)(1892–1901)
1892 Penn 15–1
1893 Penn 12–3
1894 Penn 12–0
1895 Penn 14–0
1896 Penn 14–1
1897 Penn 15–0
1898 Penn 12–1
1899 Penn 8–3–2
1900 Penn 12–1
1901 Penn 10–5
Penn:124–15–2
Illinois Fighting Illini (Western Conference)(1903)
1903 Illinois 8–61–57th
Illinois:8–61–5
Carlisle Indians (Independent)(1905)
1905 Carlisle 10–4
Carlisle:10–4
Total:142–25–2
      National championship        Conference title        Conference division title or championship game berth

Note: Before 1936, national champions were determined by historical research and retroactive ratings and polls.
1894 Poll Results = Penn: Parke H. Davis, Princeton: Houlgate, Yale: Billingsley, Helms, National Championship Foundation, Parke H. Davis
1895 Poll Results = Penn: Billingsley, Helms, Houlgate, National Championship Foundation, Parke H. Davis, Yale: Parke H. Davis
1897 Poll Results = Penn: Billingsley, Helms, Houlgate, National Championship Foundation, Parke H. Davis, Yale: Parke H. Davis
George Woodruff's last game as a coach was the 1905 Carlisle-Army game after which he went to Washington for a government job. Ralph Kinney completed Carlisle's season, going 3–2 over the five games played after Woodruff's departure.

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1895 Penn Quakers football team

The 1895 Penn Quakers football team represented the University of Pennsylvania in the 1895 college football season. The team finished with a 14–0 record and was retroactively named as the national champion by the Billingsley Report, Helms Athletic Foundation, Houlgate System, and National Championship Foundation, and as a co-national champion by Parke H. Davis. They outscored their opponents 480 to 24.

The 1897 Penn Quakers football team represented the University of Pennsylvania in the 1897 college football season. The team finished with a 15–0 record and was retroactively named as the national champion by the Billingsley Report, Helms Athletic Foundation, Houlgate System, and National Championship Foundation, and as a co-national champion by Parke H. Davis. They outscored their opponents 463 to 20.

1904 Penn Quakers football team

The 1904 Penn Quakers football team represented the University of Pennsylvania in the 1904 college football season. The team finished with a 12–0 record and was retroactively named as the national champion by the Helms Athletic Foundation, Houlgate System, and Parke H. Davis, and as a co-national champion by the National Championship Foundation. They outscored their opponents 222 to 4.

The 1908 Penn Quakers football team represented the University of Pennsylvania in the 1908 college football season. The team finished with an 11–0–1 record and was retroactively named as the national champion by the Helms Athletic Foundation, Houlgate System, and Parke H. Davis, and as a co-national champion by the National Championship Foundation. They outscored their opponents 215 to 28.

1903 Princeton Tigers football team

The 1903 Princeton Tigers football team represented Princeton University in the 1903 college football season. The team finished with an 11–0 record and was retroactively named as the national champion by the Billingsley Report, Helms Athletic Foundation, Houlgate System, and Parke H. Davis, and as a co-national champion by the National Championship Foundation. They outscored their opponents 259 to 6.

1887 Yale Bulldogs football team

The 1887 Yale Bulldogs football team represented Yale University in the 1887 college football season. The team finished with a 9–0 record and was retroactively named as the national champion by the Billingsley Report, Helms Athletic Foundation, Houlgate System, National Championship Foundation, and Parke H. Davis.

1888 Yale Bulldogs football team

The 1888 Yale Bulldogs football team represented Yale University in the 1888 college football season. The team finished with a 13–0 record and was retroactively named as the national champion by the Billingsley Report, Helms Athletic Foundation, Houlgate System, National Championship Foundation, and Parke H. Davis.

The 1891 Yale Bulldogs football team represented Yale University in the 1891 college football season. The team finished with a 13–0 record and a 488-0 season score. It was retroactively named as the national champion by the Billingsley Report, Helms Athletic Foundation, Houlgate System, National Championship Foundation, and Parke H. Davis.

1892 Yale Bulldogs football team

The 1892 Yale Bulldogs football team represented Yale University in the 1892 college football season. The team finished with a 13–0 record and was retroactively named as the national champion by the Billingsley Report, Helms Athletic Foundation, Houlgate System, National Championship Foundation, and Parke H. Davis.

1900 Yale Bulldogs football team

The 1900 Yale Bulldogs football team represented Yale University in the 1900 college football season. The team finished with a 12–0 record and was retroactively named as the national champion by the Billingsley Report, Helms Athletic Foundation, Houlgate System, National Championship Foundation, and Parke H. Davis.

The 1907 Yale Bulldogs football team represented Yale University in the 1907 college football season. The team finished with a 9–0–1 record and was retroactively named as the national champion by the Billingsley Report, Caspar Whitney, the Helms Athletic Foundation, the Houlgate System, the National Championship Foundation, and Parke H. Davis.

The 1909 Yale Bulldogs football team represented Yale University in the 1909 college football season. The team finished with a 10–0 record and was retroactively named as the national champion by the Billingsley Report, Helms Athletic Foundation, Houlgate System, National Championship Foundation, and Parke H. Davis.

References

  1. Who's Who In America, 1908
  2. "Obituary Record of Graduates of Yale University Deceased during the Year 1933-1934" (PDF). Yale University. October 15, 1934. Retrieved March 24, 2011.
  3. "Penn Biographies: George W. Woodruff (1864 -1934)". University of Pennsylvania University Archives and Records Center. Archived from the original on April 23, 2018. Retrieved March 24, 2011.
Political offices
Preceded by
George Alter
Attorney General of Pennsylvania
1923–1927
Succeeded by
Thomas Baldrige
Sporting positions
Preceded by
Ellis Ward
University of Pennsylvania Head Rowing Coach
1892–1895
Succeeded by
Ellis Ward