Gerald Francis Clifford

Last updated

Gerald Francis Clifford
Gfclifford.jpg
Undated portrait of Clifford
Born(1889-06-19)June 19, 1889
DiedFebruary 24, 1952(1952-02-24) (aged 62)
OccupationLawyer and politician
Known forOfficer, Green Bay Packers, Inc.
Spouse(s)Mae Clifford (née  Heney)
Children2

Gerald Francis Clifford (June 19, 1889 February 24, 1952) was a trial lawyer, politician, and executive officer of the Green Bay Packers. Clifford began his legal career in 1913 after studying law at the University of Michigan. He was an active trial lawyer, specializing in cases regarding search and seizure and Prohibition. He once served as assistant Attorney General of Wisconsin where he became well-known for prosecuting corruption cases. Politically, Clifford was a leader in the Democratic Party of Wisconsin and was once a Wisconsin Democratic nominee for Congress in 1934. In addition to his work in law and politics, he also served as an executive officer and team lawyer for the Green Bay Packers. Clifford helped the organization avoid bankruptcy, reincorporated the team under a new ownership model, and helped prevent the team from moving away from Green Bay, Wisconsin. He is one of The Hungry Five, a group of businessman who were instrumental in the early development of the Packers. Clifford died on February 24, 1952 at the age of 62. In recognition of his contributions, he was elected to the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1991.

Green Bay Packers National Football League franchise in Green Bay, Wisconsin

The Green Bay Packers are a professional American football team based in Green Bay, Wisconsin. The Packers compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's National Football Conference (NFC) North division. It is the third-oldest franchise in the NFL, dating back to 1919, and is the only non-profit, community-owned major league professional sports team based in the United States. Home games have been played at Lambeau Field since 1957.

University of Michigan Public research university in Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States

The University of Michigan, often simply referred to as Michigan, is a public research university in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The university is Michigan's oldest; it was founded in 1817 in Detroit, as the Catholepistemiad, or University of Michigania, 20 years before the territory became a state. The school was moved to Ann Arbor in 1837 onto 40 acres (16 ha) of what is now known as Central Campus. Since its establishment in Ann Arbor, the university campus has expanded to include more than 584 major buildings with a combined area of more than 34 million gross square feet spread out over a Central Campus and North Campus, two regional campuses in Flint and Dearborn, and a Center in Detroit. The university is a founding member of the Association of American Universities.

Search and seizure police power

Search and Seizure is a procedure used in many civil law and common law legal systems by which police or other authorities and their agents, who, suspecting that a crime has been committed, commence a search of a person's property and confiscate any relevant evidence found in connection to the crime.

Contents

Early life

Gerald Francis Clifford was born in Chilton, Wisconsin on June 19, 1889, but grew up in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. [1] During his childhood, Clifford's father Jerry served as the mayor of Iron Mountain, Michigan for period of time. [2] The family lived in Escanaba, Michigan during Clifford's teenage years, where he would attend Escanaba High School. [3] After graduation, he traveled across Europe for 18 months while providing a written account of his travels for the local newspaper. [4] Back in America, Clifford attended the University of Michigan and received a law degree in 1912. [2]

Chilton, Wisconsin City in Wisconsin, United States

Chilton is a city in and county seat of Calumet County in the U.S. state of Wisconsin. The population was 3,933 at the 2010 census. The city is located partially within the Town of Chilton.

Upper Peninsula of Michigan Northern major peninsula of the U.S. state of Michigan

The Upper Peninsula (UP), also known as Upper Michigan, is the northern of the two major peninsulas that make up the U.S. state of Michigan. The peninsula is bounded on the north by Lake Superior, on the east by the St. Marys River, and on the south by Lake Michigan, the Straits of Mackinac, and Lake Huron. Topographically, the base of the Upper Peninsula as a geologic feature lies in northeastern Wisconsin between the base of the Door Peninsula and Superior Bay; but in political geography, because most of the peninsula is within the boundaries of Michigan, it is measured eastward from the Porcupine Mountains, from the Wisconsin-Michigan boundary along and between the Montreal and Menominee rivers.

Iron Mountain, Michigan City in Michigan, United States

Iron Mountain is a city in the U.S. state of Michigan. The population was 7,624 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Dickinson County, in the state's Upper Peninsula. Iron Mountain was named for the valuable iron ore found in the vicinity.

Clifford began his legal practice in 1913 with Patrick Martin, who was the father of John E. Martin, the future Wisconsin Supreme Court Chief Justice. [5] He would remain associated with the Martin law firm for the rest of his career, serving as a senior partner at the time of his death. [6] Clifford ran for public office in 1916, losing an election to become the Wisconsin Attorney General. In 1923, he was appointed as a Brown County, Wisconsin assistant district attorney and in 1924 was named assistant Attorney General of Wisconsin. [5] He became a well-known trial lawyer who specialized in Prohibition cases and search and seizure law. [7] He also tried many corrupt practices cases during his time as a prosecutor. [2] He handled 26 murder cases as a defense attorney; none of his clients were found guilty of the original charge. [4]

John Edward Martin, Sr., was an American politician and jurist from Wisconsin. He was the 14th Chief Justice of the Wisconsin Supreme Court and 29th Attorney General of Wisconsin.

Wisconsin Supreme Court the highest court in the U.S. state of Wisconsin

The Wisconsin Supreme Court is the highest appellate court in Wisconsin. The Supreme Court has jurisdiction over original actions, appeals from lower courts, and regulation or administration of the practice of law in Wisconsin.

Brown County, Wisconsin County in the United States

Brown County is a county in the U.S. state of Wisconsin. As of the 2010 census, the population was 248,007, making it the fourth-most populous county in Wisconsin. The county seat is Green Bay. Brown County is part of the Green Bay, WI Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Clifford was a leader of the Democratic Party of Wisconsin and a strong supporter of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. [8] He served as a delegate to every Democratic National Convention from 1932 until his death. [5] He was the chairman of the Wisconsin 8th District Democratic organizing committee and was part of various campaign committees. [5] In 1934, he ran for public office a second time, losing a Congressional election. [2] Prior to his death, he was mentioned as a possible appointee for a federal judgeship. [7]

Democratic Party of Wisconsin

The Democratic Party of Wisconsin is the affiliate of the Democratic Party in the state of Wisconsin. It is currently headed by state party chair Ben Wikler.

Democratic National Convention series of presidential nominating conventions held every four years since 1832 by the United States Democratic Party

The Democratic National Convention (DNC) is a series of presidential nominating conventions held every four years since 1832 by the United States Democratic Party. They have been administered by the Democratic National Committee since the 1852 national convention. The primary goal of the Democratic National Convention is to nominate and confirm a candidate for president and vice president, adopt a comprehensive party platform and unify the party. Pledged delegates from all fifty U.S. states and from American dependencies and territories such as Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and superdelegates which are unpledged delegates representing the Democratic establishment, attend the convention and cast their votes to choose the Party's presidential candidate. Like the Republican National Convention, the Democratic National Convention marks the formal end of the primary election period and the start of the general election season.

Green Bay Packers

Clifford became acquainted with the Green Bay Packers in the early 1920s. He was one of the local Green Bay, Wisconsin businessmen whom Andrew B. Turnbull contacted to help raise money to keep the Packers afloat financially. [9] Around 1929, Clifford began his first official role with the team when he replaced Ray Evrard as the team lawyer. [10] His contributions over the next 20 years were so significant that he became recognized as one of The Hungry Five, a group of Green Bay businessmen who helped guide the early development of the Packers. [5] He would go on to serve on the Packers board of directors from 1929 to 1950 and the executive committee from 1930 to 1950. [1] From 1930 to 1933, he was elected vice president, [1] serving under president Lee Joannes. [11] He was also in charge of the Packers season-ticket drives for areas outside of the Green Bay metropolitan area. [8]

Green Bay, Wisconsin City in Wisconsin, United States

Green Bay is a city in and the county seat of Brown County in the U.S. state of Wisconsin, at the head of Green Bay, a sub-basin of Lake Michigan, at the mouth of the Fox River. It is 581 feet (177 m) above sea level and 112 miles (180 km) north of Milwaukee. The population was 104,057 at the 2010 census. Green Bay is the third-largest city in the state of Wisconsin, after Milwaukee and Madison, and the third-largest city on Lake Michigan's west shore, after Chicago and Milwaukee. Green Bay is home to the National Football League's Green Bay Packers.

Andrew B. Turnbull

Andrew Blair Turnbull, was a businessman and American football executive. Turnbull founded and owned the Green Bay Press-Gazette and was the first president of the Green Bay Football Corporation, the non-profit organization that owns the Green Bay Packers. He served as publisher, general manager, and business manager of the Press-Gazette for 45 years. During the early years of the Green Bay Packers, Turnbull helped convert the team from a privately held franchise to a publicly owned, non-profit corporation. He also helped the team through multiple financially challenging periods, which saw him identified as part of The Hungry Five, a group of early Packers supporters. Between 1923 and 1928, he served as the first president of the Green Bay Football Corporation and remained on the corporation's board of directors and executive committee until 1949. Turnbull died in 1960 and was elected to the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1977.

Raymond E. Evrard was an attorney and the second president of the Green Bay Football Corporation, the non-profit organization that owns the Green Bay Packers. In addition to his role as Packers president for one year, Evrard also served on the Packers board of directors and was the team's lawyer until 1929. Evrard was also elected for three terms as district attorney of Brown County, Wisconsin, serving from 1922 to 1929. He continued practicing law until the 1970s. Evrard played an important, yet often overlooked role in helping to organize the Packers during the team's early years through his various leadership roles. Evrard died on March 21, 1974.

As the Packers attorney from 1929 to 1950, he defended the Packers in various lawsuits, including a case in 1933 where a fan fell from the stands. [12] The resulting settlement from the lawsuit forced the Packers into receivership during the early 1930s. [1] He then helped draft and sign the Articles of Incorporation after the franchise was reorganized in 1935 as the Green Bay Packers, Inc. [10] The reorganization and resulting stock sales brought the Packers back from financial difficulties. [13] In 1949 and 1950, he and former Packers president and team physician W. Webber Kelly successfully saved the non-profit status of the Packers organization in a power struggle with head coach Curly Lambeau. [14] Even though they succeeded in maintaining the ownership structure and preventing the Packers from moving to a different city, [15] both men resigned from the board of directors. [10] Webber left in 1949 [16] and Clifford resigned all his positions in 1950. [1] Clifford was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1991 in recognition for his contributions as an executive for the team during its early years. [17]

In law, receivership is a situation in which an institution or enterprise is held by a receiver—a person "placed in the custodial responsibility for the property of others, including tangible and intangible assets and rights"—especially in cases where a company cannot meet financial obligations or enters bankruptcy. The receivership remedy is an equitable remedy that emerged in the English chancery courts, where receivers were appointed to protect real property. Receiverships are also a remedy of last resort in litigation involving the conduct of executive agencies that fail to comply with constitutional or statutory obligations to populations that rely on those agencies for their basic human rights.

Green Bay Packers, Inc. is the official name of the publicly held nonprofit corporation that owns the Green Bay Packers football franchise of the National Football League (NFL).

W. Webber Kelly

W. Webber Kelly, born William Webber Kelly, was a prominent medical doctor in the state of Wisconsin known for being the third president of the Green Bay Football Corporation, the non-profit organization that owns the Green Bay Packers. Kelly was a practicing physician in the Green Bay, Wisconsin area for almost 50 years and a respected civic leader. During his one year as president of the Packers for the 1929 season, the team went 12–0–1 and won its first NFL Championship. Kelly was identified as part of The Hungry Five, a group of Green Bay businessmen who were instrumental in guiding the Packers through multiple financially challenging periods. In addition to his presidency, Kelly served as the team physician from 1921 to 1943 and as a member of the Packers' board of directors from 1923 to 1949. After a falling out with Packers co-founder, head coach, and general manager Curly Lambeau, Kelly resigned from the Board in 1949. Two years later he died of a heart attack at the age of 75. In recognition of his contributions, Kelly was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1994.

Personal life

Clifford was married to Mae Heney [8] and had two daughters. [5] His hobbies included hunting, fishing, and gardening. [7] [8] He died from influenza, which was made worse by a heart condition, on February 24, 1952, at the age of 62. [3]

Related Research Articles

Mike Michalske American football player and coach

August Mike Michalske, sometimes known as "Iron Mike", was an American football player and coach. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame as part of its second induction class in 1964. He was also named in 1969 to the NFL 1920s All-Decade Team.

George Whitney Calhoun American sports editor

George Whitney Calhoun was an American newspaper editor and co-founder of the Green Bay Packers, a professional American football team based in Green Bay, Wisconsin. After establishing the Packers in 1919 with Curly Lambeau, Calhoun served the team in various capacities for 44 years until his death in 1963. Utilizing his editorial job at the Green Bay Press-Gazette, he became the team's first publicity director, helping to establish local support and interest. He also served as the first team manager and was a member of the board of directors of the non-profit corporation that owns the team. Although often overshadowed by the more famous Curly Lambeau, Calhoun was instrumental to the early success of the Packers. In recognition of his contributions, Calhoun was elected to the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1978.

Morgan Lewis Martin American politician

Morgan Lewis Martin was a delegate to the United States Congress from Wisconsin Territory from 1845 to 1847. He also served as a member of the Wisconsin State Senate and Wisconsin State Assembly, and served as a County Judge in Brown County, Wisconsin.

William Josiah MacDonald was a politician from the U.S. state of Michigan.

The Hungry Five are the five Green Bay, Wisconsin area businessmen who were instrumental in keeping the Green Bay Packers franchise in operation during its early years. They raised funds, incorporated the team as a non-profit corporation, sold stock, established the Green Bay Packers Board of Directors and otherwise promoted the franchise.

Jug Girard American football player

Earl Francis "Jug" Girard was an American football player. He played ten seasons in the National Football League (NFL) as an end, halfback, quarterback, punter, kickoff returner, defensive back, and punt returner. He played for the Green Bay Packers (1948-1951), Detroit Lions (1952-1956), and Pittsburgh Steelers (1957). He won two NFL Championships with the Lions in 1952 and 1953. He played college football at the University of Wisconsin in 1944 and 1947 and was selected as a first-team All-American halfback at age 17 in 1944.

Dominic Olejniczak American politician, sports executive

Dominic John Olejniczak was the mayor of Green Bay, Wisconsin and the president and chairman of the Board of the Green Bay Packers.

Jab Murray was a player in the National Football League for the Green Bay Packers and Racine Legion from 1921 to 1924. He played at the collegiate level at Marquette University.

Robert James Parins was an American judge and the president of the Green Bay Packers, an American professional football team, from 1982 to 1989.

George Baldwin Smith was an American politician and lawyer. He was the 4th Attorney General of Wisconsin, and the 3rd and 16th Mayor of Madison, Wisconsin.

Wilfird Francis "Bill" Doyle was a politician in the state of Michigan.

Koss, Michigan Unincorporated community in Michigan, United States

Koss is an unincorporated community in Menominee County, Michigan, United States. Koss is located in Lake Township, 4.9 miles (7.9 km) west-southwest of Stephenson.

Eli Parsons Royce

Eli Parsons Royce was a surveyor, businessman, postmaster, and an attorney. He was the founder of the city of Escanaba, Michigan.

Nelson Ludington

Nelson Ludington was a nineteenth-century American businessman, lumber baron and banker. Born in Ludingtonville, New York, he made his fortune in the Midwest based on resource exploitation: lumber, iron ore and copper.

Lee Joannes

Joseph Leland Heath Joannes, known as Lee Joannes or Leland Joannes, was a businessman and American football executive. Joannes owned a wholesale grocery store and was the fourth president of the Green Bay Football Corporation, which became Green Bay Packers, Inc. during his tenure. He was part of The Hungry Five, a group of businessmen who are credited with keeping the Green Bay Packers in operation during numerous financially difficult times. He served on the Packers board of directors for over 58 years in various roles, including chairman, president, vice president, secretary, treasurer, and director emeritus. During his 17 years as president from 1930 to 1947, the Packers won six NFL Championships while enduring the Great Depression and World War II. In recognition of his contributions, he was elected to the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1981. Joannes died in 1982 at the age of 89.

Emil R. Fischer American businessman and football executive

Emil Richard Fischer was a businessman and an American football executive for the Green Bay Packers. Fischer was well known in the Green Bay cheese industry, a nationally recognized businessman, and a local civic leader. From 1948 to 1952, he served as the fifth president of Green Bay Packers, Inc., the non-profit organization that owns the Green Bay Packers. He is credited with leading the Packers through one of the most difficult periods in the team's history. During his tenure, the team's co-founder and longtime coach Curly Lambeau resigned, the Packers issued their third stock sale, and the National Football League (NFL) merged with the All-America Football Conference (AAFC). He also sat on the organization's board of directors and executive committee from 1935 to 1958. After his presidency ended, he served as chairman of the board until his death in 1958. In recognition of his contributions to the team, Fischer was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 2013.

Russ Bogda American businessman

Russell W. Bogda was an American automotive executive and president of the Green Bay Packers. From 1953 to 1957, he served as the sixth president of Green Bay Packers, Inc., the non-profit organization that owns the Packers. During his presidency, the Packers secured funding and built New City Stadium, which would be renamed in 1965 to Lambeau Field. Although the Packers during Bogda's tenure saw little on-field success, he helped the organization stay financially successful and the construction of a new stadium during his tenure kept the Packers in Green Bay, Wisconsin. Bogda died at the age of 46 on February 22, 1958 of lung cancer.

References

Citations

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 Christl, Cliff (June 6, 2018). "Gerald F Clifford". Green Bay Packers, Inc. Archived from the original on November 21, 2018. Retrieved May 15, 2019.
  2. 1 2 3 4 "Gerald Clifford, Green Bay, Dead". Janesville Daily Gazette. February 25, 1952. p. 16. Archived from the original on April 2, 2015. Retrieved March 14, 2015 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .
  3. 1 2 "Gerald Clifford Dies in Green Bay". The Escanaba Daily Press. February 25, 1952. p. 10. Archived from the original on April 2, 2015. Retrieved March 14, 2015 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .
  4. 1 2 Collins 2013, p. 17.
  5. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "Atty. Clifford is dead at 62". Milwaukee Journal . February 25, 1952. p. 15, part 1. Archived from the original on March 10, 2016. Retrieved May 15, 2019 via Google News Archive Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .
  6. "Clifford Funeral Set Wednesday: Part 1". Green Bay Press-Gazette . February 25, 1952. p. 1. Archived from the original on May 15, 2019. Retrieved May 15, 2019 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .
  7. 1 2 3 "Clifford Funeral Set Wednesday: Part 2". Green Bay Press-Gazette . February 25, 1952. p. 2. Archived from the original on May 15, 2019. Retrieved May 15, 2019 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .
  8. 1 2 3 4 Collins 2013, p. 18.
  9. Collins 2013, p. 13.
  10. 1 2 3 Christl, Cliff (May 26, 2016). "The truth and myth about 'The Hungry Five'". Green Bay Packers, Inc. Archived from the original on June 30, 2016. Retrieved May 15, 2019.
  11. "L.H. Joannes Retires as Packer President; Served 17 Years". Green Bay Press-Gazette . July 23, 1947. p. 13. Archived from the original on December 22, 2018. Retrieved May 15, 2019 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .
  12. Collins 2013, p. 21.
  13. "Green Bay Packers Stock & Financial History". Green Bay Packers, Inc. Archived from the original on April 29, 2008. Retrieved May 15, 2019.
  14. Collins 2013, p. 32.
  15. Collins 2013, p. 5.
  16. "Opposed to Packer Strategy". Chippewa Herald-Telegram. Associated Press. December 16, 1949. p. 8. Archived from the original on November 2, 2018. Retrieved May 15, 2019 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .
  17. Collins 2013, p. 19.

Bibliography