Gerloc

Last updated
Gerloc
Born912
Died(962-10-14)14 October 962
Noble family House of Normandy
Spouse(s) William Towhead
Father Rollo of Normandy
Mother Poppa of Bayeux

Gerloc (or Geirlaug), baptised in Rouen as Adela (or Adèle) in 912, was the daughter of Rollo, of Normandy, Count of Rouen, and his wife, Poppa of Bayeux. [1] She was the sister of William I Longsword of Normandy.

In 935, she married William Towhead, the future Count of Poitou and Duke of Aquitaine. They had two children together before she died on 14 October 962:

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References

  1. Commire, Anne, ed. (2002). "Gerloc (d. 963)". Women in World History: A Biographical Encyclopedia. Waterford, Connecticut: Yorkin Publications. ISBN   0-7876-4074-3. Archived from the original on 2015-09-24.