Gerry Helme

Last updated

Gerry Helme
Gerard Helme - Warrington.jpeg
Personal information
Full nameGerard J. Helme
Born(1923-04-04)4 April 1923
Leigh district, England
Died19 December 1981(1981-12-19) (aged 58)
Leigh district, England
Playing information
Position Scrum-half
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1945–57 Warrington 442101190341
Representative
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1948–54 Lancashire 111003
1954 Combined Nationalities 10000
1948–53 England 41003
1948–54 Great Britain 123009
Coaching information
Club
YearsTeamGmsWDLW%
Leigh
Oldham
Total0000
Source: [1] [2] [3] [4]

Gerard "Gerry" J. Helme (4 April 1923 – 19 December 1981) was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1940s and 1950s, and coached. He played at representative level for Great Britain, England, Combined Nationalities and Lancashire, and at club level for Warrington, as a scrum-half, and coached at club level. [1] [2] [3] Helme played his entire club career for Warrington, with whom he won three Championship Finals and two Challenge Cup Finals and became a Warrington Wolves Hall of Fame inductee. [5]

Contents

Background

Helme's birth was registered in Leigh, Lancashire, [6] he was a pupil of St. Joseph’s school, Leigh, and he died aged 58.

Playing career

Helme made his début for Warrington on Wednesday 29 August 1945. Helme played scrum-half in Warrington's 15-5 victory over Bradford Northern in the 1947-48 Championship Final at Maine Road, Manchester. [7] Helme played scrum-half in Warrington's 8-14 defeat by Wigan in the 1948–49 Lancashire Cup Final at Station Road, Swinton on Saturday 13 November 1948, [8] Helme played scrum-half in Warrington's 19-0 victory over Widnes in the 1949–50 Challenge Cup Final at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 6 May 1950, in front of a crowd of 94,249. He played scrum-half in Warrington's 5-28 defeat by Wigan in the 1950–51 Lancashire Cup Final at Station Road, Swinton on Saturday 4 November 1950. [9]

Helme represented Combined Nationalities in the 15-19 defeat by France at Stade de Gerland, Lyon on Sunday 3 January 1954. Helme played scrum-half in the 4-4 draw with Halifax in the 1953–54 Challenge Cup Final at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 24 April 1954, in front of a crowd of 81,841, and played scrum-half in the 8-4 victory over Halifax in the 1953–54 Challenge Cup Final replay at Odsal Stadium, Bradford on Wednesday 5 May 1954, in front of a record crowd of 102,575 or more. [10] Helme became the first player to win the Lance Todd Trophy twice, his first coming in the victory over Widnes in the 1949–50 Challenge Cup Final, and his second coming in the victory over Haliax in the 1953–54 Challenge Cup Final replay.

Helme won caps for England while at Warrington in 1948 against Wales, France, in 1949 against Wales, France, in 1953 against France, [2] and won caps for Great Britain while at Warrington in 1948 against Australia (3 matches), in 1954 against Australia (3 matches), New Zealand (2 matches), in the 1954 Rugby League World Cup against France (2 matches), Australia, New Zealand. He also helped Great Britain to victory by scoring the match-winning try in the first ever World Cup Final in 1954. [3]

Helme played his last match for Warrington on Saturday 2 February 1957 (Heritage № 457).[ citation needed ]

Post-playing

After retiring from playing, Gerry Helme had coaching roles with Leigh and Oldham. In 1981 he died at the age of 58.

Related Research Articles

Nathan "Nat" Douglas Silcock was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s, and coached in the 1960s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, England, Rugby League XIII, Lancashire, and Australia's Newcastle team, and at club level for Wigan, St. Helens, Warrington, South Newcastle and Eastern Suburbs, as a wing, prop, or second-row, i.e. number 2 or 5, 8 or 10, or, 11 or 12, during the era of contested scrums, and coached at club level for South Newcastle and Eastern Suburbs.

Joe Egan (rugby league) former GB & England international rugby league footballer

Joseph Egan was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s, and coached in the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s. He played at representative level for Great Britain and England and Lancashire, and at club level for Wigan from 1938 to 1950, Oldham and Leigh, as a hooker, or second-row, i.e. number 9, or, 11 or 12, during the era of contested scrums, and coached at club level for Leigh, Wigan, Widnes, Warrington and Blackpool Borough. Egan is a Wigan Hall of Fame inductee, and was a life member at Wigan, Egan later became coach of Wigan, taking them to Championship success in the 1959–60 season.

Ken Gee

Kenneth Gee, was an English rugby league footballer who played in the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s. He played at representative level for Great Britain winning 17 caps between 1946 and 1951, England winning 18-caps between 1943 and 1951, and Lancashire, and at club level for Wigan and Oldham, as a prop, i.e. number 8 or 10, during the era of contested scrums. He is an inductee of the Wigan Hall of Fame, having featured in Wigan's Rugby Football League Championship wins of 1945–46, 1946–47 and 1949–50 as well as their Challenge Cup victories of 1948 and 1951. He also won Lancashire Cup winner's medals seven times.

William Hudson is an English former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1940s and 1950s, and coached in the 1950s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, England and Yorkshire, and at club level for Batley, Wigan and Wakefield Trinity (captain), as a prop, second-row, or loose forward, i.e. number 8 or 10, 11 or 12, or 13, during the era of contested scrums, and coached at club level for Featherstone Rovers.

Stanley "Stan"/ "Mac" McCormick was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1940s and 1950s, and coached in the 1960s and 1970s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, England and Lancashire, and at club level for Broughton Rangers/Belle Vue Rangers, Huddersfield, St. Helens and Warrington, with whom he won the 1953–54 Challenge Cup, as a wing, i.e. number 2 or 5. and coached at club level for St. Helens and Salford. McCormick is a St Helens R.F.C. Hall of Fame inductee.

John "Johnnie"/"Johnny" H. Lawrenson was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s, and coached in the 1960s. He played at representative level for Great Britain and England, and at club level for Wigan, Leeds, and Workington Town, as a wing, i.e. number 2 or 5, and coached at club level for Wigan (caretaker).

Dennis Goodwin was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1950s and 1960s. He played at representative level for Great Britain and England, and at club level for Barrow, Leeds and York, as a centre, prop, or second-row, i.e. number 3 or 4, 8 or 10, or, 11 or 12, during the era of contested scrums.

A. Edward "Ted" Toohey was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s, and coached in the 1970s. He played at representative level for Great Britain and England, and at club level for Wigan, Barrow, Leigh and Liverpool City, as a centre or scrum-half, i.e. number 3 or 4, or, 7, and coached at club level for Wigan.

Thomas McCue was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1930s and 1940s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, England and Lancashire, and at club level for Widnes, Warrington, Halifax and St Helens, as a scrum-half, i.e. number 7.

Jim Featherstone

James "Jim"/"Jimmy" J. Featherstone was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1940s and 1950s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, England and Lancashire, and at club level for Ince Rangers ARLFC, Wigan, Warrington, Belle Vue Rangers and Rochdale Hornets, as a prop, second-row, or loose forward, i.e. number 8 or 10, 11 or 12, or 13, during the era of contested scrums.

Albert Naughton

Albert Naughton, also known by the nickname of "Ally", was an English World Cup winning professional rugby league footballer who played as a centre or loose forward in the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s.

Harold Palin

Harold Palin, also known by the nickname of "Moggy", was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s. He played at representative level for Great Britain and England, and at club level for Warrington (captain), Swinton, Halifax and Keighley (captain), as a goal-kicking fullback or loose forward, i.e. number 1, or 13, during the era of contested scrums. Harold Palin's nickname of 'Moggy' was given to him as a child due to cat-like abilities, however he was not particularly fond of the nickname.

Bob Ryan (rugby league)

Robert Ryan was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1940s and 1950s. He played at representative level for Great Britain and England, and at club level for Triangle Valve ARLFC, Warrington, as a second-row, or loose forward, i.e. number 11 or 12, or 13, during the era of contested scrums.

Ronald Ryder is an English former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1950s. He played at representative level for Great Britain and England, and at club level for Warrington, as a centre, i.e. number 3 or 4.

William Blan was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1940s and 1950s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, England and Lancashire, and at club level for Wigan, Leeds, St. Helens and Rochdale Hornets, as a second-row or loose forward, i.e. number 11 or 12, or, 13, during the era of contested scrums.

Thomas Bradshaw was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, England and Lancashire, and at club level for Wigan, Leigh and Workington Town, plus a one-off WW2 guest appearance for St Helens, as a scrum-half, i.e. number 7.

Jack Cunliffe was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1930s, 1940s, 1950s and 1960s. He played at representative level for Great Britain and England as a utility Back, e.g. fullback, wing, centre, stand-off or scrum-half, i.e. number 1, 2 or 5, 3 or 4, 6, or, 7. Jack Cunliffe played for Wigan in four decades; he made his début for Wigan on Saturday 9 December 1939, and he played his last match for Wigan on Saturday 9 January 1960.

Frank Barton was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1940s and 1950s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, England and British Empire XIII, and at club level for Wigan and Barrow, as a prop, or hooker, i.e. number 8 or 10, or 9, during the era of contested scrums.

William Derbyshire was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1940s and 1950s. He played at representative level for England, and at club level for Liverpool Stanley and Warrington, as a prop, i.e. number 8 or 10, during the era of contested scrums.

Oswald "Ossie" Peake was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1930s and 1940s. He played at representative level for England, and at club level for Warrington and Huddersfield, as a wing or centre, i.e. number 2 or 5, or, 3 or 4.

References

  1. 1 2 "Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  2. 1 2 3 "England Statistics at englandrl.co.uk". englandrl.co.uk. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  3. 1 2 3 "Great Britain Statistics at englandrl.co.uk". englandrl.co.uk. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  4. "Coach Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  5. "Hall of Fame (archived)". wire2wolves.com. 31 December 2017. Archived from the original on 7 October 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  6. "Birth details at freebmd.org.uk". freebmd.org.uk. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  7. "History of Warrington Rugby League Club". britishrugbyleague.blogspot.co.uk. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  8. "1948-1949 Lancashire Cup Final". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  9. "1950-1951 Lancashire Cup Final". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  10. "Mud, blood and memories of the day when 102,575 made history at Odsal". independent.co.uk. 31 December 2016. Retrieved 1 January 2017.
Sporting positions
Preceded by
Don Gullick
1958-1960
Coach
Leigh colours.svg
Leigh

????-??
Succeeded by
Alex Murphy
1966–1971