Gertrude Crampton

Last updated
Gertrude Crampton
Born(1909-06-26)June 26, 1909
Brooklyn, New York, US
DiedJune 25, 1996(1996-06-25) (aged 86)
Green Valley, Arizona, US
Alma mater University of Michigan (1928), Ann Arbor
GenreChildren's literature
Notable works Tootle , Scuffy the Tugboat

Gertrude Crampton (June 26, 1909 June 25, 1996) was an author of children's books, including Tootle (1945) and Scuffy the Tugboat (1946).

Biography

Gertrude Crampton was born on June 26, 1909, in Brooklyn, New York, to Faust Crampton and Ruby O'Mally Crampton. [1] She received her teaching credentials from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor in 1928 [2] and taught in the Mason Consolidated Schools [3] in Erie, Michigan in the 1950s and 1960s.

Her books Tootle and Scuffy were published in the popular Little Golden Books series of Simon & Schuster. As of 2001, Tootle was the all-time third best-selling hardback children's book in English; Scuffy was eighth. [4] She also wrote The Large and Growly Bear, published in the Golden Beginning Reader series in 1961, and illustrated by John P. Miller.

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References

  1. "New York, New York City Births, 1846-1909," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:2WZB-C56  : 11 February 2018), Gertrude Crampton, 26 Jun 1909; citing Manhattan, New York, New York, United States, reference cn 19221 New York Municipal Archives, New York; FHL microfilm 2,022,667.
  2. The Michigan Alumnus. Vol. 36. Alumni Association of the University of Michigan. 1929. p. 731.
  3. Cousino, Dean (2017-06-21). "Four inducted into county Hall of Fame". The Monroe News. Retrieved 2022-03-14.
  4. Roback, Diane; Britton, Jason, eds. (December 17, 2001). "All-Time Bestselling Children's Books". Publishers Weekly . 248 (51). Retrieved June 27, 2011.