Gewogs of Bhutan

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A gewog (Dzongkha : རྒེད་འོགgeok, block), in the past also spelled as geog, [1] refers to a group of villages in Bhutan. The head of a gewog [2] is called a gup [3] (རྒེད་པོ་gepo). [4] Gewogs form a geographic administrative unit below dzongkhag districts (and dungkhag subdistricts, where they exist), and above Dzongkhag Thromde class B and Yenlag Thromde municipalities. Dzongkhag Thromde class A municipalities have their own independent local government body. [5]

Contents

Bhutan comprises 205 gewogs, which average 230 km2 in area. The gewogs in turn are divided into chewogs for elections and thromdes "municipalities" for administration. The Parliament of Bhutan passed legislation in 2002 and 2007 on the status, structure, and leadership of local governments, including gewogs. The most recent legislation by parliament regarding gewogs is the Local Government Act of Bhutan 2009. [6] [7] [8] In July 2011, the government slated 11 gewogs across Bhutan for reorganization, including both mergers and bifurcations, to be debated in dzongkhag local governments. These changes are contemplated to promote ease of travel to gewog capitals and to equitably allocate development resources. [9]

Gewog administration

Under the Local Government Act of 2009, zepa is head of geog each gewog is administered by a Gewog Tshogde (gewog council), subordinate to the Dzongkhag Tshogdu (district council). The Gewog Tshogde is composed of a Gup (headman), Mangmi (deputy), and between five and eight democratically elected Tshogpas from among villages or village groups. All representatives serve five-year terms, unless the local electorate petitions for an election (by a simple majority of the voting population) to vote no confidence in the local government (by at least two-thirds of the voting population). Representatives must be citizens between the ages of 25 and 65, be a resident of their constituency for at least one year, gain certification by the Election Commission, and otherwise qualify under Electoral Law. [8]

While the Gewog Tshogde has powers to regulate resources, manage public health and safety, and levy taxes on land, grazing, cattle, entertainment, and utilities, the gewog administration and all other local governments are prohibited to pass laws. The gewog administration has jurisdiction over roads, buildings (including architecture), recreational areas, utilities, agriculture, and the formulation of local five-year development plans. The Gewog Tshogde also prepares, reports, and expends its own gewog's budget under the supervision and approval of the Minister of Finance. [8]

History

Gewogs of Bhutan ahead of local government elections, 2011 Bhutan gewog location map.svg
Gewogs of Bhutan ahead of local government elections, 2011

Beginning in the late 1980s, the King of Bhutan, Jigme Singye Wangchuck pursued a long-term programme of decentralization. In 1991, following this principle, the King enacted the first Geog Yargay Tshogchung as a framework for local administration. [6] Under the first Geog Yargay Tshochung, gewogs became official administrative units, each headed by a Gup or headman. The first-ever elections in Bhutan were held at that time, with a representative from each household voting to select their local Gup.

In 2002, the Parliament of Bhutan enacted a second, more comprehensive Chathrim (Act) also called the Geog Yargay Tshochung. Under the Geog Yargay Tshochung of 2002, gewog administration included the Gup, Mangmi (deputy), Tshogpa (village or village cluster representative), and the non-voting Chupon (village messenger) and Gewog Clerk. Gup and Mangmi sat for three-year terms while normal representatives sat for one year. The body had a two-thirds quorum requirement, and voted by simple majority. The Chathrim of 2002 empowered gewogs to levy rural taxes, maintain and regulate natural resources, and manage community and cultural life. [6]

The Chathrim of 2002 was superseded by the Local Government Act of 2007, which expanded local bureaucracy and vested more powers in gewog administrators, including enforcement of driglam namzha. [11] Under the Act of 2007, additional levels of local administration were carved out from gewogs, namely Dzongkhag Thromde Tshogdes and Gyelyong Thromde Tshogdus. The former were democratically elected bodies under direct dzongkhag management; the latter were democratic autonomous urban areas, or special cities, independent of dzongkhag management. Up through the enactment of the Local Government Act of 2009, gewogs were subdivided administratively into chiwogs, comprising several villages. [7]

Since the Act of 2009, Dzongkhag Thromde Tshogdes, Gyelyong Thromde Tshogdus, and chiwogs have been replaced by thromdes (municipalities) as tertiary administrative divisions. Depending on the population and development of each thromde, it either has an independent bureaucracy ("Class A" Thromdes) or is directly administered by the gewog or dzongkhag ("Class B" and "Dzongkhag Yenlag" Thromdes). [8]

Gewog changes since 2000

In 2002, there were 199 gewogs in Bhutan's 20 dzongkhags; [12] by 2005, there were 205. [13]

In Tsirang District, Chanautey, Gairigaun, Tshokhana, and Tsirang Dangra Gewogs were disestablished; in the meanwhile Barshong, Rangthangling, Tsholingkhar, and Tsirangtoe Gewogs were created. Likewise, in Sarpang District, Sarpangtar Gewog was disestablished. Chukha District no longer contains Bhulajhora Gewog, but now contains Sampheling Gewog. Samtse District no longer contains Ghumauney, Mayona, and Nainital Gewogs; it now contains Ugentse and Yoeseltse Gewogs. In Thimphu District, Bapbi Gewog disappeared. In Samdrup Jongkhar District, Bakuli and Hastinapur Gewogs disappeared, replaced by Dewathang, Langchenphu, Pemathang, Phuntshothang, Serthi, and Wangphu Gewogs. Trashiyangtse District saw the creation of three additional gewogs: Bumdeling, Khamdang, and Ramjar. [12] [13]

Since 2005, gewogs and dzongkhags have continued to evolve. On April 26, 2007, Lhamozingkha Dungkhag (subdistrict) was formally transferred from Sarpang Dzongkhag to Dagana Dzongkhag, [14] affecting the town of Lhamozingkha and three constituent gewogs – Lhamoy Zingkha, Deorali and Nichula (Zinchula) – that formed the westernmost part of Sarpang and now form the southernmost part of Dagana. [15]

The gewogs of Bhutan

The following is a list of 205 gewogs of Bhutan by dzongkhag in a chronological order: [16]

DzongkhagGewog
Bumthang [17]
Bumthang Bhutan location map.png
Chhoekhor
ཆོས་འཁོར་
Chhume
ཆུ་མིག་
Tang
སྟང་
Ura
ཨུ་ར་
Chhukha [18]
Chukha Bhutan location map.png
Bjachho
བྱག་ཕྱོགས་
Bongo
སྦོང་སྒོར་
Chapcha
སྐྱབས་ཆ་
Darla
དར་ལ་
Dungna
གདུང་ན་
Geling
དགེ་གླིང་
Getana
གད་སྟག་ན་
Lokchina
ལོག་ཅི་ན་
Metakha
སྨད་བཏབ་ཁ་
Phuentsholing
ཕུན་ཚོགས་གླིང་
Sampheling
བསམ་འཕེལ་གླིང་
Dagana [19]
Dagana Bhutan location map.png
Dorona
རྡོ་རོ་ན་
Drujegang
འབྲུག་རྗེས་སྒང་
Gesarling
གེ་སར་གླིང་
Goshi
སྒོ་བཞི་
Kana
བཀར་ན་
Karmaling
ཀརྨ་གླིང་
Khebisa
ཁེ་སྦིས་ས་
Lajab
ལ་རྒྱབ་
Lhamoi Zingkha
ལྷ་མོའི་རྫིང་ཁ་
Nichula
ནི་ཅུ་ལ་
Trashiding
བཀྲིས་ལྡིང་
Tsangkha
གཙང་ཁ་
Tsendagang
བཙན་མདའ་སྒང་
Tseza
བརྩེ་ཟ་
Gasa [20]
Gasa Bhutan location map.png
Khamaed
ཁ་སྨད་
Khatoe
ཁ་སྟོད་
Laya
ལ་ཡ་
Lunana
ལུང་ནག་ན་
Haa [21]
Haa Bhutan location map.png
Bji
སྦྱིས་
Gakiling
དགའ་སྐྱིད་གླིང་
Katsho
སྐར་ཚོགས་
Samar
ས་དམར་
Sangbay
གསང་སྦས་
Uesu
དབུས་སུ་
Lhuentse [22]
Lhuntse Bhutan location map.png
Gangzur
སྒང་ཟུར་
Khoma
མཁོ་མ་
Jarey
རྒྱ་རས་
Kurtoed
ཀུར་སྟོད་
Menbi
སྨན་སྦིས་
Metsho
སྨད་མཚོ་
Minjay
སྨིན་རྒྱས་
Tsenkhar
སཙན་མཁར་
Mongar [23]
Mongar Bhutan location map.png
Balam
བ་ལམ་
Chali
ཅ་གླིང་
Chaskhar
ལྕགས་ས་མཁར་
Drametse
དགྲ་མེད་རྩེ་
Drepong
འབྲེས་སྤུངས་
Gongdue
དགོངས་འདུས་
Jurmey
འགྱུར་མེད་
Kengkhar
སྐྱེངས་མཁར་
Mongar
མོང་སྒར་
Narang
ན་རང་
Ngatshang
སྔ་ཚང་
Saling
ས་གླིང་
Shermuhoong
ཤེར་མུ་ཧཱུྃ་
Silambi
སི་ལམ་སྦི་
Thangrong
ཐང་རོང་
Tsakaling
ཙ་ཀ་གླིང་
Tsamang
རྩ་མང་
Paro [24]
Paro Bhutan location map.png
Dokar
རྡོ་དཀར་
Dopshari
རྡོབ་ཤར་རི་
Doteng
རྡོ་སྟེང་
Hungrel
ཧཱུྃ་རལ་
Lamgong
ལམ་གོང་
Lungnyi
ལུང་གཉིས་
Naja
ན་རྒྱ་
Shapa
ཤར་པ་
Tsento
བཙན་ཏོ་
Wangchang
ཝང་ལྕང་
Pema Gatshel [25]
Pemagatshel Bhutan location map.png
Chimoong
ཕྱི་མུང་
Chokhorling
ཆོས་འཁོར་གླིང་
Chongshing
ལྕོང་ཤིང་
Dechheling
བདེ་ཆེན་གླིང་
Dungmaed
གདུང་སྨད་
Khar
མཁར་
Nanong
ན་ནོང་
Norbugang
ནོར་བུ་སྒང་
Shumar
ཤུ་མར་
Yurung
ཡུ་རུང་
Zobel
བཟོ་སྦལ་
Punakha [26]
Punakha Bhutan location map.png
Barp
བརཔ་
Chhubug
ཆུ་སྦུག་
Dzomi
འཅོམས་མི་
Goenshari
དགོམ་ཤ་རི་
Guma
གུ་མ་
Kabisa
དཀར་སྦི་ས་
Lingmukha
གླིང་མུ་ཁ་
Shenga Bjemi
ཤེལ་རྔ་_སྦྱེ་མི་
Talog
རྟ་ལོག་
Toepisa
སཏོད་པའི་ས་
Toewang
སྟོད་ཝང་
Samdrup Jongkhar [27]
Samdrup Jongkhar Bhutan location map.png
Dewathang
དབེ་བ་ཐང་
Gomdar
སྒམ་དར་
Langchenphu
གླང་ཅན་ཕུ་
Lauri
ལའུ་རི་
Martshala
མར་ཚྭ་ལ་
Orong
ཨོ་རོང་
Pemathang
པདྨ་ཐང་
Phuntshothang
ཕུན་ཚོགས་ཐང་
Samrang
བསམ་རང་
Serthi
གསེར་ཐིག་
Wangphu
ཝང་ཕུག་
DzongkhagGewog
Samtse [28]
Samtse Bhutan location map.png
Dungtoe
གདུང་སྟོད་
Dophoogchen
རྡོ་ཕུག་ཅན་
Duenchukha
བདུམ་ཅུ་ཁ་
Namgaychhoeling
རྣམ་རྒྱས་ཆོས་གླིང་
Norbugang
ནོར་བུ་སྒང་
Norgaygang
ནོར་རྒྱས་སྒང་
Pemaling
པདྨ་གླིང་
Phuentshogpelri
ཕུན་ཚོགས་དབལ་རི་
Samtse
བསམ་རྩེ་
Sangngagchhoeling
གསང་སྔགས་ཆོས་གླིང་
Tading
རྟ་སྡིང་
Tashicholing
བཀྲིས་ཙོས་གླིང་
Tendruk
བསྟང་འབྲུག
Ugentse
ཨྱོན་རྩེ་
Yoeseltse
འོད་གསལ་རྩེ་
Sarpang [29]
Sarpang Bhutan location map.png
Chhuzagang
ཆུ་འཛག་སྒང་
Chhudzom
ཆུ་འཛོམས་
Dekiling
བདེ་སྐྱིད་གླིང་
Gakiling
དགའ་སྐྱིད་གླིང་
Gelephu
དགེ་ལེགས་ཕུ་
Jigmechholing
འཇིགས་མེད་ཆོས་གླིང་
Samtenling
བསམ་གཏན་གླིང་
Senggey
སེ་ངྒེ་
Sherzhong
གསེར་གཞོང་
Shompangkha
ཤོམ་སྤང་ཁ་
Tareythang
རྟ་རས་ཐང་
Umling
ཨུམ་གླིང་
Thimphu [30]
Thimphu Bhutan location map.png
Chang
ལྕང་
Darkala
དར་དཀར་ལ་
Genye
དགེ་བསྙེན་
Kawang
ཀ་ཝང་
Lingzhi
གླིང་གཞི་
Mewang
སྨད་ཝང་
Naro
ན་རོ་
Soe
སྲོས་
Trashigang [31]
Trashigang Bhutan location map.png
Bartsham
བར་མཚམས་
Bidung
སྦིས་གདུང་
Kanglung
བཀང་ལུང་
Kangpar
རྐང་པར་
Khaling
ཁ་གླིང་
Lumang
ཀླུ་མང་
Merag
མེ་རག་
Phongmed
ཕོངས་མེད་
Radi
ར་དི་
Sagteng
སག་སྟེང་
Samkhar
བསམ་མཁར་
Shongphoog
ཤོང་ཕུག་
Thrimshing
ཁྲིམས་ཤིང་
Uzorong
ཨུ་མཛོ་རོང་
Yangnyer
ཡངས་ཉེར་
Trashi Yangtse [32]
Trashiyangtse Bhutan location map.png
Bumdeling
བུམ་སྡེ་གླིང་
Jamkhar
འཇམ་མཁར་
Khamdang
ཁམས་དྭངས་
Ramjar
རམ་སྦྱར་
Toetsho
སྟོད་མཚོ་
Tomzhang
སྟོང་མི་གཞང་ས་
Yalang
ཡ་ལང་
Yangtse
གཡང་རྩེ་
Trongsa [33]
Trongsa Bhutan location map.png
Dragteng
བྲག་སྟེང་
Korphoog
སྐོར་ཕུག་
Langthil
གླང་མཐིལ་
Nubi
ནུ་སྦིས་
Tangsibji
སྟང་སི་སྦྱིས་
Tsirang [34]
Tsirang Bhutan location map.png
Barshong
བར་གཤོང་
Dunglegang
དུང་ལ་སྒང་
Gosarling
སྒོ་གསར་གླིང་
Kikhorthang
དཀྱིལ་འཁོར་ཐང་
Mendrelgang
མནྜལ་སྒང་
Patshaling
པ་ཚ་གླིང་
Phuntenchu
སྤུང་རྟེན་ཆུ་
Rangthangling
རང་ཐང་གླིང་
Semjong
སེམས་ལྗོངས་
Sergithang
གསེར་གྱི་ཐང་
Tsholingkhar
མཚོ་གླིང་མཁར་
Tsirangtoe
རྩི་རང་སྟོད་
Wangdue Phodrang [35]
Wangdue Phodrang Bhutan location map.png
Athang
ཨ་ཐང་
Bjendag
སྦྱེད་ནག་
Darkar
དར་དཀར་
Dangchu
དྭངས་ཆུ་
Gangteng
སྒང་སྟེང་
Gasetsho Gom
དགའ་སེང་ཚོ་གོངམ་
Gasetsho Wom
དགའ་སེང་ཆོ་འོགམ་
Kazhi
ཀ་གཞི་
Nahi
ན་ཧི་
Nyisho
ཉི་ཤོག་
Phangyul
ཕངས་ཡུལ་
Phobji
ཕོབ་སྦྱིས་
Ruepisa
རུས་སྦིས་ས་
Sephu
སྲས་ཕུག་
Thedtsho
ཐེད་ཚོ་
Zhemgang [36]
Zhemgang Bhutan location map.png
Bardo
བར་རྡོ་
Bjoka
འབྱོག་ཀ་
Goshing
སྒོ་ཤིང་
Nangkor
ནང་སྐོར་
Ngangla
ངང་ལ་
Phangkhar
ཕང་མཁར་
Shingkhar
ཤིང་མཁར་
Trong
ཀྲོང་

See also

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Dagana District District of Bhutan

Dagana District is a district located in Bhutan. Most of the district was populated by Nepali until 1989. Most of the Nepali were forced to leave Dagana. Some of thèm were brutally murdered and forced to sell their lands. Today, these inhuman actions of the tyrant Kingdom of Bhutan are consider as crime against humanity.

Sarpang District District of Bhutan

Sarpang District is one of the 20 dzongkhags (districts) comprising Bhutan.

Elections in Bhutan

Elections in Bhutan are conducted at national (Parliamentary) and local levels. Suffrage is universal for citizens 18 and over, and under applicable election laws. In national elections, political party participation is mainly restricted to the lower house of Parliament, and by extension, to the executive nominated by its majority.

Dungkhag Sub-district of a dzongkhag (district) of Bhutan

A dungkhag is a sub-district of a dzongkhag (district) of Bhutan. The head of a dungkhag is a Dungpa. As of 2007, nine of the twenty dzongkhags had from one to three dungkhags, with sixteen dungkhags in total.

Zhemgang Place in Zhemgang District, Bhutan

Zhemgang is a town in Zhemgang District, Bhutan. It is the capital of the district, and is located in Trong Gewog.

The development of Bhutanese democracy has been marked by the active encouragement and participation of reigning Bhutanese monarchs since the 1950s, beginning with legal reforms such as the abolition of slavery, and culminating in the enactment of Bhutan's Constitution. The first democratic elections in Bhutan began in 2007, and all levels of government had been democratically elected by 2011. These elections included Bhutan's first ever partisan National Assembly election. Democratization in Bhutan has been marred somewhat by the intervening large-scale expulsion and flight of Bhutanese refugees during the 1990s; the subject remains somewhat taboo in Bhutanese politics.

Chiwogs of Bhutan

Chiwogs of Bhutan or chios refer to the 1044 basic electoral precincts of Bhutan. Chiwogs are also former third-level administrative divisions of Bhutan below geos. Until 2009, they were the equivalent of municipalities or parishes, containing clusters of villages and hamlets. There are generally 5 or 6 chios in each geo, and in turn several geos in each dzongkha (district). To illustrate, there are 50 chios in Paro District alone. The majority of chios are small rural communities; more densely populated areas tend to be separate thromdes, or municipalities. A Chiwog Disaster Management Plan (CDMP) exists in some chios to form an effective responsive to any local disasters. Often, participants in the CDMP are also trained at a geo level for better coordination.

Dopshari Gewog Gewogs in Paro District, Bhutan

Dopshari Gewog is a gewog of Paro District, Bhutan. In 2002, the gewog had an area of 36.7 square kilometres and contained 24 villages and 299 households.

Jigmechhoeling Gewog Gewog in Sarpang District, Bhutan

Jigmechholing Gewog, also transliterated as Jigmecholing or Jigmechoeling and formerly known as Surey is a gewog of Sarpang District, Bhutan.

Lhamoy Zingkha Gewog Gewog in Dagana District, Bhutan

Lhamoy Zingkha Gewog is a gewog of Dagana District, Bhutan. It also comprises part of Lhamoy Zingkha Dungkhag (sub-district), along with Deorali and Nichula Gewogs.

Nichula Gewog Gewog in Dagana District, Bhutan

Nichula Gewog is a gewog of Dagana District, Bhutan. It also comprises part of Lhamoy Zingkha Dungkhag (sub-district), along with Lhamoy Zingkha and Deorali Gewogs.

Umling Gewog Gewog in Sarpang District, Bhutan

Umling Gewog is a gewog of Sarpang District, Bhutan.

Shumar Gewog Gewogs in Pemagatshel District, Bhutan

Shumar Gewog is a gewog in Pemagatshel District, Bhutan.

The Local Government Act of Bhutan was enacted on September 11, 2009, by parliament of Bhutan in order to further implement its program of decentralization and devolution of power and authority. It is the most recent reform of the law on Bhutan's administrative divisions: Dzongkhags, Dungkhags, Gewogs, Chiwogs, and Thromdes (municipalities). The Local Government Act of Bhutan has been slightly amended in 2014.

Thromde

A thromde is a second-level administrative division in Bhutan. The legal administrative status of thromdes was most recently codified under the Local Government Act of 2009, and the role of thromdes in elections in Bhutan was defined in the Election Act of 2008

Khamdang Gewog Place in Trashi Yangtse District, Bhutan

Khamdang Gewog is a gewog of Trashiyangtse District, Bhutan.

2011 Bhutanese local elections

The Bhutanese local government elections of 2011 were originally slated for 2008, but were delayed until 2011. Elections began on January 20, 2011, however polls opened in only 3 of 20 districts – Thimphu, Chukha District (Phuentsholing), and Samdrup Jongkhar – as part of a staggered election schedule. Polls closed June 27, 2011. Ahead of elections, 1,042 chiwogs, the basis of Bhutan's single-constituency electoral scheme, were slated to elect the leadership of Dzongkhag, Gewog, and Thromde governments.

Sergithang Gewog Gewog in Tsirang District, Bhutan

Sergithang Gewog is one of the twelve gewogs of Tsirang District, Bhutan. Sergithang Gewog is located in the northwest of Tsirang District, east of the River Puna Tsang Chu, north of its tributary Burichu, west of Pungtencchu Gewog and south of Wangdue Phodrang District.

References

  1. eg chapter 3 of the Thromde Act of Bhutan, 2007 http://www.nab.gov.bt/assets/uploads/docs/acts/2014/Thromde_act_of_Bhutan,_2007_Dzo_Eng.pdf Archived 2018-12-22 at the Wayback Machine
  2. gewog is the transliteration used by the Royal Government of Bhutan, see chapter 2, para 4b of the Local Government Act , 2009 http://www.nab.gov.bt/assets/uploads/docs/acts/2014/The_Local_Government_Act_of_Bhutan,_2009eng1stextraordinary.pdf
  3. gup is the transliteration used by the Royal Government of Bhutan, see para 304, bullet j of the Local Government Act , 2009 http://www.nab.gov.bt/assets/uploads/docs/acts/2014/The_Local_Government_Act_of_Bhutan,_2009eng1stextraordinary.pdf
  4. Driem, George van (1998). Dzongkha = Rdzoṅ-kha. Leiden: Research School, CNWS. p. 105. ISBN   978-9057890024.
  5. see chapter 2 of the Local Government Act , 2009 http://www.nab.gov.bt/assets/uploads/docs/acts/2014/The_Local_Government_Act_of_Bhutan,_2009eng1stextraordinary.pdf
  6. 1 2 3 "Geog Yargay Tshogchhung Chathrim 2002" (PDF). Government of Bhutan. 2002-07-22. Retrieved 2011-01-20.[ permanent dead link ]
  7. 1 2 "Local Government Act of Bhutan 2007" (PDF). Government of Bhutan. 2007-07-31. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-07-06. Retrieved 2011-01-20.
  8. 1 2 3 4 "Local Government Act of Bhutan 2009" (PDF). Government of Bhutan. 2009-09-11. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-07-06. Retrieved 2011-01-20.
  9. Wangchuk, Jigme (2011-07-01). "11 Gewogs Could Be Bifurcated". Archived from the original on 2011-07-12. Retrieved 2011-07-13.
  10. "Delimitation". Election Commission, Government of Bhutan. 2011. Archived from the original on 2012-10-05. Retrieved 2011-07-31.
  11. "Assignment of Functional and Financial Responsibilities to Local Governments" (PDF). Government of Bhutan, Gross National Happiness Commission. 2007. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2010-06-13. Retrieved 2011-01-24.
  12. 1 2 "Part Three: Dzongkhag and Geog Health Sector" (PDF). Government of Bhutan, Ministry of Health. 2002. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-07-06. Retrieved 2011-01-22.
  13. 1 2 "The Kingdom of Bhutan – Administrative Units". Geo Hive. Retrieved 2011-01-22.
  14. "Sarpang Dzongkhag Administration online – "Handing-Taking"". 2008-03-19. Archived from the original on 2008-03-19. Retrieved 2011-01-23.
  15. "Sarpang Dzongkhag Ninth Plan (2002-2007)" (PDF).[ permanent dead link ]
  16. Note that this list is based mainly on information of the Election Commission, which not necessarily follows the general RGOB usage. Compare for instance the different spelling of the gewogs in Chhukha dzongkhag on their own web site: http://gov.bt/local-government/chhukha-dzongkhag/
  17. "Chiwogs in Bumthang" (PDF). Election Commission, Government of Bhutan. 2011. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-10-02. Retrieved 2011-07-28.
  18. "Chiwogs in Chukha" (PDF). Election Commission, Government of Bhutan. 2011. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-10-02. Retrieved 2011-07-28.
  19. "Chiwogs in Dagana" (PDF). Election Commission, Government of Bhutan. 2011. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2016-03-04. Retrieved 2011-07-28.
  20. "Chiwogs in Gasa" (PDF). Election Commission, Government of Bhutan. 2011. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-10-02. Retrieved 2011-07-28.
  21. "Chiwogs in Haa" (PDF). Election Commission, Government of Bhutan. 2011. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-10-02. Retrieved 2011-07-28.
  22. "Chiwogs in Lhuentse" (PDF). Election Commission, Government of Bhutan. 2011. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-10-02. Retrieved 2011-07-28.
  23. "Chiwogs in Monggar" (PDF). Election Commission, Government of Bhutan. 2011. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-10-02. Retrieved 2011-07-28.
  24. "Chiwogs in Paro" (PDF). Election Commission, Government of Bhutan. 2011. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-10-02. Retrieved 2011-07-28.
  25. "Chiwogs in Pema Gatshel" (PDF). Election Commission, Government of Bhutan. 2011. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-10-02. Retrieved 2011-07-28.
  26. "Chiwogs in Punakha" (PDF). Election Commission, Government of Bhutan. 2011. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-10-02. Retrieved 2011-07-28.
  27. "Chiwogs in Samdrup Jongkhar" (PDF). Election Commission, Government of Bhutan. 2011. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-10-02. Retrieved 2011-07-28.
  28. "Chiwogs in Samtse" (PDF). Election Commission, Government of Bhutan. 2011. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-10-02. Retrieved 2011-07-28.
  29. "Chiwogs in Sarpang" (PDF). Election Commission, Government of Bhutan. 2011. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-10-02. Retrieved 2011-07-28.
  30. "Chiwogs in Thimphu" (PDF). Election Commission, Government of Bhutan. 2011. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-10-02. Retrieved 2011-07-28.
  31. "Chiwogs in Trashigang" (PDF). Election Commission, Government of Bhutan. 2011. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-10-02. Retrieved 2011-07-28.
  32. "Chiwogs in Trashiyangtse" (PDF). Election Commission, Government of Bhutan. 2011. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-10-02. Retrieved 2011-07-28.
  33. "Chiwogs in Trongsa" (PDF). Election Commission, Government of Bhutan. 2011. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-10-02. Retrieved 2011-07-28.
  34. "Chiwogs in Tsirang" (PDF). Election Commission, Government of Bhutan. 2011. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-10-02. Retrieved 2011-07-28.
  35. "Chiwogs in Wangdue Phodrang" (PDF). Election Commission, Government of Bhutan. 2011. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-10-02. Retrieved 2011-07-28.
  36. "Chiwogs in Zhemgang" (PDF). Election Commission, Government of Bhutan. 2011. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-10-02. Retrieved 2011-07-28.