Giant Sequoia National Monument

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Giant Sequoia National Monument
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The Proclamation Tree, a giant sequoia under which Giant Sequoia National Monument was established.
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Location Tulare / Fresno / Kern counties, California, United States
Nearest city Porterville, CA
Coordinates 36°2′24″N118°30′16″W / 36.04000°N 118.50444°W / 36.04000; -118.50444 Coordinates: 36°2′24″N118°30′16″W / 36.04000°N 118.50444°W / 36.04000; -118.50444
Area327,769 acres (1,326.43 km2)
CreatedApril 15, 2000 (2000-04-15)
Governing body U.S. Forest Service
Website Giant Sequoia National Monument

The Giant Sequoia National Monument is a 328,000-acre (1,330 km2) U.S. National Monument located in the southern Sierra Nevada in eastern central California. It is administered by the U.S. Forest Service as part of the Sequoia National Forest and includes 38 of the 39 Giant Sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum) groves that are located in the Sequoia National Forest, about half of the sequoia groves currently in existence, including one of the ten largest Giant Sequoias, the Boole Tree, which is 269 feet (82 m) high with a base circumference of 112 feet (38 m). The forest covers 824 square miles (1,326 square kilometers).

Contents

The monument is in two sections. The northern section surrounds General Grant Grove and other parts of Kings Canyon National Park and is administered by the Hume Lake Ranger District. The southern section, which includes Long Meadow Grove, is directly south of Sequoia National Park and is administered by the Western Divide Ranger District, surrounding the eastern half of the Tule River Indian Reservation.

The Giant Sequoia National Monument was created by President Bill Clinton in Proclamation 7295 on April 15, 2000. The Presidential Proclamation was published in the Federal Register, Tuesday, April 25, 2000, Vol. 65, No. 80

Management

Entrance sign to Giant Sequoia National Monument. Giant Sequoia National Monument Sign.jpg
Entrance sign to Giant Sequoia National Monument.

The Presidential Proclamation required that a management plan be completed within three years. In January 2004, the Sequoia National Forest published and began implementation of the Giant Sequoia National Monument Management Plan, which provided for use by an international public as well as for the protection and restoration of 33 giant sequoia groves and their ecosystems. Subsequently, two lawsuits were brought challenging the Plan. In October 2006, Federal District Court Judge Charles Breyer found in favor of the plaintiffs and remanded the Plan to the U.S. Forest Service "…so that a proper Monument Plan can be developed in accordance with the Presidential Proclamation,… and in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA)…"[ citation needed ]

In January 2008, the Sequoia National Forest published a Notice of Intent (NOI) in the Federal Register that they intended to prepare an environmental impact statement and were beginning a year-long collaborative scoping process for development of a new Giant Sequoia National Monument Management Plan. [1]

As of August 2010 only one location in the Monument, the Generals Highway, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, but the Monument does have several hundred sites that are potentially eligible for the Register.[ citation needed ]

See also

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The Generals Highway is a highway that connects State Route 180 and State Route 198 through Sequoia National Park, Giant Sequoia National Monument, and Kings Canyon National Park in the Sierra Nevada of California. As the road goes through national parks and monuments, the highway is primarily maintained by the federal government instead of a California State Highway controlled by Caltrans.

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Converse Basin Grove

Converse Basin Grove is a grove of giant sequoia trees in the Giant Sequoia National Monument in the Sierra Nevada, in Fresno County, California, 5 miles (8 km) north of General Grant Grove, just outside Kings Canyon National Park in the national monument managed by the Sequoia National Forest. It covers about 3,700 acres (15 km2) with sequoias concentrated in the basin formed by Converse Creek.

Mountain Home Grove

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Monarch Wilderness Protected wilderness area in California, United States

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Long Meadow Grove

Long Meadow Grove, also known as Redwood Meadow Grove, is a giant sequoia grove located within Sequoia National Forest approximately 3.25 mi (5.23 km) west of Johnsondale, California. The grove is part of the southern section of Giant Sequoia National Monument and is administered by the U.S. Forest Service.

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References

  1. "Sequoia National Forest - Projects and Plans, Giant Sequoia National Monument Management Plan". www.fs.fed.us.