Gila County, Arizona

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Gila County, Arizona
Gila county arizona courthouse.jpg
Gila County Courthouse in Globe
Gila County az seal.jpg
Seal
Map of Arizona highlighting Gila County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Arizona
Map of USA AZ.svg
Arizona's location within the U.S.
FoundedFebruary 8, 1881
Seat Globe
Largest town Payson
Area
  Total4,795 sq mi (12,419 km2)
  Land4,758 sq mi (12,323 km2)
  Water38 sq mi (98 km2), 0.8%
Population (est.)
  (2018)53,889
  Density11/sq mi (4/km2)
Congressional districts 1st, 4th
Time zone Mountain: UTC−7
Website www.gilacountyaz.gov

Gila County is a county in the central part of the U.S. state of Arizona. As of the 2010 census its population was 53,597. [1] The county seat is Globe. [2]

County (United States) Subdivision used by most states in the United States of America

In the United States, an administrative or political subdivision of a state is a county, which is a region having specific boundaries and usually some level of governmental authority. The term "county" is used in 48 U.S. states, while Louisiana and Alaska have functionally equivalent subdivisions called parishes and boroughs respectively.

U.S. state constituent political entity of the United States

In the United States, a state is a constituent political entity, of which there are currently 50. Bound together in a political union, each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a separate and defined geographic territory and shares its sovereignty with the federal government. Due to this shared sovereignty, Americans are citizens both of the federal republic and of the state in which they reside. State citizenship and residency are flexible, and no government approval is required to move between states, except for persons restricted by certain types of court orders. Four states use the term commonwealth rather than state in their full official names.

Arizona state of the United States of America

Arizona is a state in the southwestern region of the United States. It is also part of the Western and the Mountain states. It is the sixth largest and the 14th most populous of the 50 states. Its capital and largest city is Phoenix. Arizona shares the Four Corners region with Utah, Colorado, and New Mexico; its other neighboring states are Nevada and California to the west and the Mexican states of Sonora and Baja California to the south and southwest.

Contents

Gila County comprises the Payson, Arizona Micropolitan Statistical Area.

Payson, Arizona Town in Arizona, United States

Payson is a town in northern Gila County, Arizona, United States. Its location puts it very near to the geographic center of Arizona. Payson has been called "The Heart of Arizona". The town is surrounded by the Tonto National Forest and has many outdoor activities year round. As of the 2010 census, the population of Payson was 15,301.

Gila County contains parts of Fort Apache Indian Reservation and San Carlos Indian Reservation.

Fort Apache Indian Reservation

The Fort Apache Indian Reservation is an Indian reservation in Arizona, United States, encompassing parts of Navajo, Gila, and Apache counties. It is home to the federally recognized White Mountain Apache Tribe of the Fort Apache Reservation, a Western Apache tribe. It has a land area of 2,627 square miles (6,800 km2) and a population of 12,429 people as of the 2000 census. The largest community is in Whiteriver.

History

The county was formed from parts of Maricopa County and Pinal County on February 8, 1881. [3] The boundary was then extended eastward to the San Carlos River by public petition in 1889. The original county seat was in the mining community of Globe City, now Globe, Arizona.

San Carlos River (United States) river in the United States of America

The San Carlos River is a 37-mile (60 km) long tributary of the Gila River in southeast Arizona, United States. The river drains an arid region of 1,026 square miles (2,660 km2), situated mostly within the San Carlos Indian Reservation.

Globe, Arizona City in Arizona, United States

Globe is a city in Gila County, Arizona, United States. As of the 2010 census, the population of the city was 7,532. The city is the county seat of Gila County. Globe was founded c. 1875 as a mining camp. Mining, tourism, government and retirees are most important in the present-day Globe economy.

Popular theory says that the word Gila was derived from a Spanish contraction of Hah-quah-sa-eel, a Yuma word meaning "running water which is salty". [4]

In the 1880s, a long range war broke out in Gila County that became the most costly feud in American history, resulting in an almost complete annihilation of the families involved. The Pleasant Valley War (also sometimes called the Tonto Basin Feud or Tonto Basin War) matched the cattle-herding Grahams against the sheep-herding Tewksburys. Once partisan feelings became tense and hostilities began, Frederick Russell Burnham, who later became a celebrated scout and the inspiration for the boy scouts, was drawn into the conflict on the losing side. [5] [6] Burnham shot many men in the feud, and was himself nearly killed by a bounty hunter. [7] Tom Horn, a famous assassin, was also known to have taken part as a killer for hire, but it is unknown as to which side employed him, and both sides suffered several murders to which no suspect was ever identified. In the 1960s, it was home of Gerald Gault, who was the subject of the 1967 U.S. Supreme Court ruling, in re Gault , that stated juveniles have the same rights as adults when arrested to be notified of the charges against them, the rights to attorneys, for family members to be notified of their arrests and to confront their accusers and to not be punished harsher than adults who are convicted of the same crime, especially if an adult's penalty for the crime would be less than a juvenile convict's.

Pleasant Valley War

The Pleasant Valley War, sometimes called the Tonto Basin Feud, or Tonto Basin War, or Tewksbury-Graham Feud, was a range war fought in Pleasant Valley, Arizona in the years 1882-1892. The conflict involved two feuding families, the ranchers Grahams and Tewksburys. The Tewksburys, who were part Indian, started their operations as cattle ranchers before branching out to sheep.

Frederick Russell Burnham father of scouting; military scout; soldier of fortune; oil man; writer; rancher

Frederick Russell Burnham DSO was an American scout and world-traveling adventurer. He is known for his service to the British South Africa Company and to the British Army in colonial Africa, and for teaching woodcraft to Robert Baden-Powell in Rhodesia. He helped inspire the founding of the international Scouting Movement.

Scouting World-wide movement for the education of youth, founded by Robert Baden-Powell in 1907

Scouting or the Scout Movement is a movement with a strong focus on the outdoors and survival skills that aims to support young people in their physical, mental, and spiritual development so that they may play constructive roles in society. During the first half of the twentieth century, the movement grew to encompass three major age groups for boys and, in 1910, a new organization, Girl Guides, was created for girls. It is one of several worldwide youth organizations.

Geography

Gila County-Pinto Creek Bridge-Hwy 60 in Gila County -1949.jpg
Pinto Creek Bridge on US 60
Gila County-Pinto Creek Bridge-Hwy 60 in Gila County -1949 -2.jpg
The "Most Beautiful Bridge" plaque.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 4,795 square miles (12,420 km2), of which 4,758 square miles (12,320 km2) is land and 38 square miles (98 km2) (0.8%) is water. [8]

Adjacent counties

National protected areas

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1890 2,021
1900 4,973146.1%
1910 16,348228.7%
1920 25,67857.1%
1930 31,01620.8%
1940 23,867−23.0%
1950 24,1581.2%
1960 25,7456.6%
1970 29,25513.6%
1980 37,08026.7%
1990 40,2168.5%
2000 51,33527.6%
2010 53,5974.4%
Est. 201853,889 [9] 0.5%
U.S. Decennial Census [10]
1790–1960 [11] 1900–1990 [12]
1990–2000 [13] 2010–2018 [1]

2000 census

As of the census [14] of 2000, there were 51,335 people, 20,140 households, and 14,098 families residing in the county. The population density was 11 people per square mile (4/km²). There were 28,189 housing units at an average density of 6 per square mile (2/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 77.82% White, 0.38% Black or African American, 12.92% Native American, 0.43% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 6.59% from other races, and 1.80% from two or more races. 16.65% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 9.84% reported speaking Spanish at home, while 6.29% speak Western Apache. [15]

There were 20,140 households out of which 26.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.10% were married couples living together, 10.80% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.00% were non-families. 25.80% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.30% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.50 and the average family size was 2.99.

In the county, the population was spread out with 25.10% under the age of 18, 6.40% from 18 to 24, 22.30% from 25 to 44, 26.40% from 45 to 64, and 19.80% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 96.80 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.20 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $30,917, and the median income for a family was $36,593. Males had a median income of $31,579 versus $22,315 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,315. About 12.60% of families and 17.40% of the population were below the poverty line, including 25.90% of those under age 18 and 7.90% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census

As of the 2010 census, there were 53,597 people, 22,000 households, and 14,294 families residing in the county. [16] The population density was 11.3 inhabitants per square mile (4.4/km2). There were 32,698 housing units at an average density of 6.9 per square mile (2.7/km2). [17] The racial makeup of the county was 76.8% white, 14.8% American Indian, 0.5% Asian, 0.4% black or African American, 0.1% Pacific islander, 5.3% from other races, and 2.0% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 17.9% of the population. [16] In terms of ancestry, 17.4% were German, 13.3% were English, 11.4% were Irish, and 3.4% were American. [18]

Of the 22,000 households, 25.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.6% were married couples living together, 11.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 35.0% were non-families, and 29.3% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.39 and the average family size was 2.94. The median age was 47.9 years. [16]

The median income for a household in the county was $37,580 and the median income for a family was $46,292. Males had a median income of $41,698 versus $30,023 for females. The per capita income for the county was $19,600. About 11.6% of families and 18.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 27.4% of those under age 18 and 10.0% of those age 65 or over. [19]

Politics

Historically Gila County has been a Democratic-leaning county in largely Republican Arizona – for instance it voted for Adlai Stevenson II in 1952, Hubert Humphrey in 1968 and (very narrowly in a three-way contest) for John W. Davis in 1924. In much of the “dealignment” period from 1960 to 1980, when Arizona was the only state never carried by a Democrat, Gila was the second most-Democratic county in Arizona behind massively unionized Greenlee. Only during very large Presidential landslides was Gila County carried by Republicans before 2000: indeed, apart from Ronald Reagan and Richard Nixon in 1972 no Republican before 2000 ever carried the county by more than seven percentage points.

Since 2000, however, like Greenlee County, Gila County has trended heavily towards the Republican Party, and Hillary Clinton’s 2016 performance was the worst ever by a Democratic presidential nominee.

Presidential elections results
Gila County vote
by party in presidential elections
[20] [21]
Year Republican Democratic Others
2016 63.0%14,18231.1% 7,0035.9% 1,330
2012 62.3%13,45535.6% 7,6972.1% 443
2008 62.9%14,09535.2% 7,8842.0% 438
2004 59.1%12,34339.8% 8,3141.1% 220
2000 51.6%9,15843.4% 7,7005.0% 878
1996 36.8% 6,40749.3%8,57713.9% 2,427
1992 31.3% 5,78141.0%7,57127.7% 5,126
1988 51.4%7,86146.7% 7,1471.9% 291
1984 56.0%8,54342.7% 6,5091.3% 197
1980 55.3%7,40537.8% 5,0686.9% 926
1976 42.9% 5,13653.8%6,4403.2% 386
1972 54.7%5,67341.4% 4,2953.9% 404
1968 37.2% 3,61049.8%4,83113.0% 1,265
1964 35.2% 3,71364.7%6,8210.0% 3
1960 42.0% 3,80657.9%5,2510.1% 8
1956 51.3%4,23448.7% 4,026
1952 43.3% 3,77056.7%4,928
1948 32.1% 2,32965.8%4,7802.2% 156
1944 31.8% 2,26067.8%4,8180.4% 29
1940 31.2% 2,62468.4%5,7520.4% 31
1936 23.2% 1,52674.0%4,8592.8% 183
1932 27.8% 1,86568.8%4,6253.4% 228
1928 50.6%3,43649.2% 3,3410.2% 13
1924 34.6% 2,19334.9%2,21830.5% 1,937
1920 53.4%3,31146.6% 2,894
1916 26.1% 1,49564.3%3,6869.6% 552
1912 10.3% 21038.1%77951.6% 1,056 [lower-alpha 1]

Transportation

Major highways

Airports

The following public-use airports are located in the county:

Communities

Map of the incorporated and major unincorporated areas in Gila County. Also shown are borders for Indian reservations in the County. Gila County Incorporated and Unincorporated areas.svg
Map of the incorporated and major unincorporated areas in Gila County. Also shown are borders for Indian reservations in the County.

City

Towns

Ghost towns

Census-designated places

Other communities

Indian communities

County population ranking

The population ranking of the following table is based on the 2010 census of Gila County. [22] [23]

county seat

RankCity/Town/etc.Population (2010 Census)Municipal typeIncorporated
1 Payson 15,301Town
2Globe 7,532City1875 (founded)
3 San Carlos 4,038 CDP
4 Central Heights-Midland City 2,534CDP
5 Star Valley 2,310Town2005
6 Pine 1,963CDP
7 Miami 1,837Town
8 Claypool 1,538CDP
9 Tonto Basin 1,424CDP
10 Peridot 1,350CDP
11 Canyon Day 1,209CDP
12Six Shooter Canyon1,019CDP
13 Strawberry 961CDP
14Wheatfields785CDP
15Mesa del Caballo765CDP
16Icehouse Canyon677CDP
17 Young 666CDP
18 Hayden (partially in Pinal County )662Town
19 Gisela 570CDP
20Round Valley487CDP
21Pinal439CDP
22 Winkelman (partially in Pinal County )353Town
23 Cedar Creek 318CDP
24Tonto Village256CDP
25 Dripping Springs 235CDP
t-26 Beaver Valley 231CDP
t-26 Top-of-the-World 231CDP
27 East Globe 226CDP
28Oxbow Estates217CDP
29 Deer Creek 216CDP
30 East Verde Estates 170CDP
31 Christopher Creek 156CDP
32Whispering Pines148CDP
33 Carrizo 127CDP
34 Copper Hill 108CDP
35Freedom Acres84CDP
36 Rye 77CDP
37Jakes Corner76CDP
38 Cutter 74CDP
39Washington Park70CDP
40Geronimo Estates60CDP
41Rock House50CDP
42Hunter Creek48CDP
43 Kohls Ranch 46CDP
44 Flowing Springs 42CDP
45Mead Ranch38CDP
46 El Capitan 37CDP
47 Roosevelt 28CDP
48Haigler Creek19CDP
49 Bear Flat 18CDP

Notable people

See also

Notes

  1. This comprises 542 votes (26.5%) for Progressive Theodore Roosevelt, 501 votes (25.1%) for Socialist Eugene V. Debs, and 13 votes (0.6%) for Prohibition Party candidate Eugene W. Chafin.

Related Research Articles

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Navajo County, Arizona County in the United States

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Pinal County, Arizona County in the United States

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Canyon Day, Arizona Census-designated place in Arizona, United States

Canyon Day is a census-designated place (CDP) in Gila County, Arizona, United States. The population was 1,209 at the 2010 census.

Claypool, Arizona Census-designated place in Arizona, United States

Claypool is a census-designated place (CDP) in Gila County, Arizona, United States. The population was 1,538 at the 2010 census, down from 1,794 at the 2000 census.

Gisela, Arizona Census-designated place in Arizona, United States

Gisela is an unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) in Gila County, Arizona, United States. The population was 570 at the 2010 census.

Miami, Arizona Town in Arizona, United States

Miami is a town in Gila County, Arizona, United States. Miami is a classic Western copper boom-town. Miami's old downtown has been partly renovated, and the Bullion Plaza Museum features the cultural, mining and ranching history of the Miami area.

Peridot, Arizona Census-designated place in Arizona, United States

Peridot ) is an unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) in Gila and Graham counties in the U.S. state of Arizona. The population was 1,350 at the 2010 census.

Pine, Arizona Census-designated place in Arizona, United States

Pine is an unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) in Gila County, Arizona, United States. The population was 1,963 at the 2010 census. Pine was established by four Mormon families in 1879.

San Carlos, Arizona Census-designated place in Arizona, United States

San Carlos is a census-designated place (CDP) in Gila County, Arizona, United States. The population was 4,038 at the 2010 census, up from 3,716 at the 2000 census.

Strawberry, Arizona Census-designated place in Arizona, United States

Strawberry is an unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) in Gila County, Arizona, United States. The population was 961 at the 2010 census.

Star Valley, Arizona Town in Arizona, United States

Star Valley is a town in Gila County, Arizona, United States, incorporated in 2005. Before incorporation, it was a census-designated place (CDP). As of the 2010 census the population of the town was 2,310.

Tonto Basin, Arizona Census-designated place in Arizona, United States

Tonto Basin is a census-designated place (CDP) in Gila County, Arizona, United States. The population was 1,424 at the 2010 United States Census, up from 840 at the 2000 census.

Top-of-the-World, Arizona Census-designated place in Arizona, United States

Top-of-the-World is a census-designated place (CDP) in Gila and Pinal counties in the U.S. state of Arizona. The population was 231 at the 2010 census, down from 330 at the 2000 census.

Winkelman, Arizona Town in Arizona, United States

Winkelman is a town in Gila and Pinal counties in the U.S. state of Arizona. According to the 2010 census, the population of the town was 353, all of whom lived in Gila County.

Young, Arizona Census-designated place in Arizona, United States

Young is an unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) in Gila County, Arizona, United States. The population was 666 as of the 2010 census, up from 561 at the 2000 census.

Queen Valley, Arizona CDP

Queen Valley is a census-designated place (CDP) in north central Pinal County, Arizona. The population was 820 at the 2000 census.

Roosevelt, Arizona Census-designated place in Arizona, United States

Roosevelt is a census-designated place (CDP) in Gila County, Arizona, United States. The population was 28 at the 2010 census.

References

  1. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 10, 2011. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. http://cip.azlibrary.gov/Collection.aspx?CollID=1170
  4. "Gila National Forest (archived)". United States Forest Service. 2003-12-04. Archived from the original on January 11, 2006. Retrieved 2007-10-16.
  5. Forrest, Earle R. (1936). Arizona's Dark and Bloody Ground; an authentic account of the sanguinary Pleasant Valley vendetta that swept through Arizona's cattleland in the latter eighteen eighties--the Graham-Tewksbury feud. Caldwell, Idaho: Caxton Printers, Ltd. pp. 15, 292. OCLC   1825248.
  6. Burnham, Frederick Russell (1926). Scouting on Two Continents. Doubleday, Page & company. pp. 2, Chapters 3 & 4. OCLC   407686.
  7. Lott, Jack (1981). "Chapter 8. The Making of a Hero: Burnham in the Tonto Basin". In Boddington, Craig (ed.). America -- The Men and Their Guns That Made Her Great. Petersen Publishing Co. p. 90. ISBN   0-8227-3022-7.
  8. "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 23, 2012. Retrieved August 23, 2015.
  9. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved May 10, 2019.
  10. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  11. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  12. "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  13. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  14. "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  15. http://www.mla.org/map_data_results&state_id=4&county_id=7&mode=geographic&order=r
  16. 1 2 3 "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2016-01-20.
  17. "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2016-01-20.
  18. "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2016-01-20.
  19. "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2016-01-20.
  20. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org.
  21. Scammon, Richard M. (compiler); America at the Polls: A Handbook of Presidential Election Statistics 1920-1964; pp. 42-44 ISBN   0405077114
  22. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2013-12-21. Retrieved 2013-02-10.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  23. Geography, US Census Bureau. "2010 Census Block Maps". www.census.gov. Retrieved 23 March 2018.

Coordinates: 33°47′28″N110°50′11″W / 33.79111°N 110.83639°W / 33.79111; -110.83639