Giles Strangways

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Arms of Strangways: Sable, two lions passant paly of six argent and gules StrangwaysArms.svg
Arms of Strangways: Sable, two lions passant paly of six argent and gules

Giles Strangways (3 June 1615 20 July 1675) of Melbury House in Somerset, was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons variously between 1640 and 1675. He fought on the Royalist side during the Civil War

Melbury House Grade I listed house in West Dorset, United Kingdom

Melbury House in the parish of Melbury Sampford near Evershot, Dorset, has been the seat of the Strangways family of Dorset since the estate was acquired in 1500 from William Browning by Sir Henry Strangways (c.1465-1504) who had married his widow. The mediaeval manor house of the Browning family was rebuilt after 1546 by Henry's great-grandson Sir Giles Strangways (1528-1562) using ham stone from a quarry nine miles away. Though Sir Giles lived extravagantly and encumbered his considerable estate with debts at his premature death, at Melbury he built a conservative house, "a courtyard with no frills", as Mark Girouard described it, "apart from the one gesture of its tower". This remarkable feature, a hexagonal tower, rises near the intersection of three ranges of buildings, filled above the level of adjoining roofbeams with banks of tall arched windows of many leaded panes that offer views in every direction over the rolling landscape of the park and the countryside beyond. Its roof has mock battlements.

House of Commons of England parliament of England up to 1707

The House of Commons of England was the lower house of the Parliament of England from its development in the 14th century to the union of England and Scotland in 1707, when it was replaced by the House of Commons of Great Britain. In 1801, with the union of Great Britain and Ireland, that house was in turn replaced by the House of Commons of the United Kingdom.

English Civil War series of armed conflicts and political machinations between Parliamentarians and Royalists

The English Civil War (1642–1651) was a series of armed conflicts and political machinations between Parliamentarians ("Roundheads") and Royalists ("Cavaliers") over, principally, the manner of England's governance. The first (1642–1646) and second (1648–1649) wars pitted the supporters of King Charles I against the supporters of the Long Parliament, while the third (1649–1651) saw fighting between supporters of King Charles II and supporters of the Rump Parliament. The war ended with the Parliamentarian victory at the Battle of Worcester on 3 September 1651.

Contents

Origins

He was the son of Sir John Strangways (1585-1666) of Melbury.

Career

In April 1640 he was elected a Member of Parliament for Weymouth and Melcombe Regis, Dorset, in the Short Parliament. He was elected MP for Bridport, Dorset, in the Long Parliament in November 1640. [1] He supported the king and was a Colonel in a regiment of horse. He was disabled from sitting in Parliament in January 1644 and was fined £10,000 for the service of the navy in August 1644. He was imprisoned in the Tower of London for two and a half years, partly as a hostage for his father. When he was set free, he had a very large gold medal struck, to commemorate his imprisonment. [2]

Weymouth and Melcombe Regis was a parliamentary borough in Dorset represented in the English House of Commons, later in that of Great Britain, and finally in the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It was formed by an Act of Parliament of 1570 which amalgamated the existing boroughs of Weymouth and Melcombe Regis. Until 1832, the combined borough continued to elect the four Members of Parliament (MPs) to which its constituent parts had previously been entitled; the Great Reform Act reduced its representation to two Members, and the constituency was abolished altogether in 1885, becoming part of the new South Dorset constituency.

Short Parliament Parliament of England that was summoned by King Charles I of England

The Short Parliament was a Parliament of England that was summoned by King Charles I of England on 20 February 1640 and sat from 13 April to 5 May 1640. It was so called because of its short life of only three weeks.

Bridport was a parliamentary borough in Dorset, England, which elected two Members of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons from 1295 until 1868, and then one member from 1868 until 1885, when the borough was abolished.

In 1651, as King Charles II was trying to escape from England after losing the Battle of Worcester, he stayed at Trent Manor, the home of Francis Wyndham, who consulted his cousin Strangways (both were descended from John Wadham (d.1578)) about finding a ship to carry the king to France. Strangways was unable to help find a ship, but was able to provide 300 gold pieces to Charles, and encouraged Wyndham to search further in the area around Lyme (now Lyme Regis.) [3]

Battle of Worcester final battle of the English Civil War

The Battle of Worcester took place on 3 September 1651 at Worcester, England, and was the final battle of the English Civil War. Oliver Cromwell's Parliamentarian New Model Army, 28,000 strong, defeated King Charles II's 16,000 Royalists, of whom the vast majority were Scottish.

Lyme Regis Coastal town in Dorset, England

Lyme Regis is a town in West Dorset, England, 25 miles (40 km) west of Dorchester and 25 miles (40 km) east of Exeter. Styled "The Pearl of Dorset", it lies at Lyme Bay on the English Channel coast at the Dorset–Devon border. It is noted for fossils found in cliffs and beaches on the Heritage Coast or Jurassic Coast – a World Heritage Site. The harbour wall known as "The Cobb" appears in Jane Austen's novel Persuasion, in the John Fowles novel The French Lieutenant's Woman, and in the 1981 film of that name, which was partly shot in the town. A former mayor and MP was Admiral Sir George Somers, who founded the English colonial settlement of Somers Isles, now known as Bermuda. Lyme Regis is twinned with St George's, Bermuda. In July 2015 Lyme Regis also joined Jamestown, Virginia in the Historic Atlantic Triangle of Lyme, St George's and Jamestown. The 2011 Census gave the parish and electoral ward a population of 3,671.

In 1661 Strangways was elected a MP for Dorset for the Cavalier Parliament remaining until his death in 1675. [1]

Dorset was a county constituency covering Dorset in southern England, which elected two Members of Parliament (MPs), traditionally known as knights of the shire, to the House of Commons of England from 1290 until 1707, to the House of Commons of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800, and to the House of Commons of the United Kingdom until 1832.

Cavalier Parliament ruling body of 17th century England

The Cavalier Parliament of England lasted from 8 May 1661 until 24 January 1679. It was the longest English Parliament, enduring for nearly 18 years of the quarter-century reign of Charles II of England. Like its predecessor, the Convention Parliament, it was overwhelmingly Royalist and is also known as the Pensioner Parliament for the many pensions it granted to adherents of the King.

Marriage & issue

Strangways married Susanna Edwards, a daughter of Thomas Edwards, of the City of London, a member of the Worshipful Company of Mercers, by whom he had issue including: [1]

City of London City and county in United Kingdom

The City of London is a city and county that contains the historic centre and the primary central business district (CBD) of London. It constituted most of London from its settlement by the Romans in the 1st century AD to the Middle Ages, but the agglomeration has since grown far beyond the City's borders. The City is now only a tiny part of the metropolis of London, though it remains a notable part of central London. Administratively, it forms one of the 33 local authority districts of Greater London; however, the City of London is not a London borough, a status reserved for the other 32 districts. It is also a separate county of England, being an enclave surrounded by Greater London. It is the smallest county in the United Kingdom.

The Worshipful Company of Mercers is the premier Livery Company of the City of London and ranks first in the order of precedence of the Companies. It is the first of the Great Twelve City Livery Companies. Although of even older origin, the Company was incorporated under a Royal Charter in 1394, the Company's earliest extant Charter. The Company's aim was to act as a trade association for general merchants, and especially for exporters of wool and importers of velvet, silk and other luxurious fabrics (mercers). By the 16th century many members of the Company had lost any connection with the original trade. Today, the Company exists primarily as a charitable institution, supporting a variety of causes. The Company's motto is Honor Deo, Latin for "Honour to God".

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References

Parliament of England
Preceded by
Parliament suspended since 1629
Member of Parliament for Weymouth and Melcombe Regis
1640
With: Sir John Strangways
Richard King
Thomas Gyard
Succeeded by
Sir John Strangways
Sir Gerrard Napier, 1st Baronet
Sir Walter Erle
Preceded by
Thomas Trenchard
Sir John Meller
Member of Parliament for Bridport
1640–1644
With: Roger Hill
Succeeded by
Roger Hill
Roger Ceeley
Preceded by
John Fitzjames
Robert Coker
Member of Parliament for Dorset
1661–1675
With: John Strode
Succeeded by
John Strode
Lord Digby