Giselbert of Luxembourg

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Print depicting Giselbert's death Giselbert zoon van Reginar Lankhals.jpg
Print depicting Giselbert's death

Giselbert of Luxembourg (c. 1007 – 14 August 1059) was count of Salm and of Longwy, then count of Luxemburg from 1047 to 1059. He was a son of Frederick of Luxembourg, [1] count of Moselgau, and perhaps of Ermentrude of Gleiberg.

At first count of Salm and of Longwy, on his brother Henry II's death he inherited the county of Luxembourg, [2] as well as providing the income for the abbeys of Saint-Maximin in Trier and Saint-Willibrord in Echternach. He got into an argument with the archbishop of Trier Poppon as to the abbaye Saint-Maximin, which was arbitrated by his brother Adalbero III, bishop of Metz.

In 1050, since the population of the town of Luxembourg had risen considerably, he expanded the city by building a new fortified wall around it.

By an unknown wife, he had:

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References

  1. Pit Péporté (2011). Constructing the Middle Ages: Historiography, Collective Memory and Nation-Building in Luxembourg. BRILL.
  2. Luxembourg Doing Business for Everyone Guide - Practical Information and Contacts. p. 39.
  3. Gades, John A. (1951). Luxembourg in the Middle Ages. Brill.
Giselbert of Luxembourg
Born: 1007 Died: 14 August 1059
Preceded by
Henry II
Count of Luxembourg
1047–1059
Succeeded by
Conrad I