Giuseppe Farina

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Giuseppe Farina
NinoFarina.jpg
Nationality Flag of Italy.svg Italian
BornEmilio Giuseppe Farina
(1906-10-30)30 October 1906
Turin, Piedmont, Kingdom of Italy
Died30 June 1966(1966-06-30) (aged 59)
Aiguebelle, Savoie, France
Formula One World Championship career
Active years 19501956
Teams Alfa Romeo, Ferrari, Lancia
Entries36 (33 starts)
Championships 1 (1950)
Wins 5
Podiums20 [1]
Career points115 13 (127 13) [2]
Pole positions 5
Fastest laps 5
First entry 1950 British Grand Prix
First win 1950 British Grand Prix
Last win 1953 German Grand Prix
Last entry 1956 Indianapolis 500
24 Hours of Le Mans career
Years 1953
Teams Scuderia Ferrari
Best finishDISQ

Emilio Giuseppe Farina, also known as Giuseppe Antonio "Nino" Farina, [3] (Italian pronunciation:  [dʒuˈzɛppe ˈniːno faˈriːna] ; 30 October 1906 – 30 June 1966) was an Italian racing driver and first official Formula One World Champion. He gained the title in 1950. He was the Italian Champion in 1937, 1938 and 1939.

Contents

Early years

Born in Turin, Farina was the son of Giovanni Carlo Farina (1884–1957) who founded the Stabilimenti Farina coachbuilder. [4] He began driving a two-cylinder Temperino, at the age of just nine. Farina became a Doctor of Political Science (although some sources say engineering); he also excelled at skiing, football and athletics. He cut short a career as a cavalry officer with the Italian army to fulfil a different ambition: motor racing. [5] [6] [7] [3] [8]

While still at university Farina purchased his first car, a second-hand Alfa Romeo, and ran it in the 1925 Aosta-Gran San Bernardo Hillclimb. While trying to beat his father, he crashed, breaking his shoulder and receiving facial cuts, establishing a trend that continued throughout his crash-prone career. His father finished fourth. [5] [6] [3] [9] [10]

Farina's damaged Alfa Romeo 8C-35 at the 1936 Deauville Grand Prix Giuseppe Farina's damaged racecar at the 1936 Deauville Grand Prix.jpg
Farina's damaged Alfa Romeo 8C-35 at the 1936 Deauville Grand Prix

During the 1933 and 1934 seasons Farina returned to the sport, racing Maseratis and Alfa Romeos for Gino Rovere and Scuderia Subalpina, and began a friendship with Italian racing legend Tazio Nuvolari. It was Nuvolari who to some extent, guided Farina's early career. [5] In 1935, he raced for the factory Maserati team, showing enough promise to impress Enzo Ferrari, who recruited him to drive for Scuderia Ferrari, the team that ran the works-supported Alfa Romeos. It was in an Alfa Romeo 8C that he finished second in the Mille Miglia, after driving through the night without lights. He became a Grand Prix winner when he won the 1937 Grand Prix of Naples. [5] [6] [3] [8] [9] [10]

Although he was noted [ by whom? ] for his driving style and intelligence, he had a petulant streak and disregard for his fellow competitors whilst on the race track. He was involved in two fatal accidents. The first was during the 1936 Grand Prix de Deauville, when he tried to pass Marcel Lehoux for second. Farina's Alfa Romeo 8C collided with Lehoux's ERA, causing the ERA to overturn and catch fire. Lehoux was thrown out, received a fractured skull and died in hospital, while Farina escaped with minor injuries. Two seasons later, during the 1938 Gran Premio di Tripoli, László Hartmann's Maserati 4CM cut a corner in front of Farina. The cars collided and overturned. Farina survived without major injuries, but Hartmann died the following day. [10] [11] [12]

In 1938, the official Alfa Romeo team, Alfa Corse, returned to motor sport and Farina was a member. Driving the new Alfa Romeo 158 Voiturette in 1939, he won the Grand Prix d'Anvers, Coppa Ciano and the Prix de Berne, to become the Italian Champion for the third year in succession. The following year, he won the Tripoli Grand Prix and finished second in the Mille Miglia for the third time. [5] [6] [8] [9] [10]

Post-World War II career

After World War II, Farina returned to Alfa Corse to drive their 158. He won the 1946 Grand Prix des Nations. However, he left Alfa Corse after a disagreement over team leadership and sat out the whole of the 1947 season. He came back to the sport in 1948 with a privately entered Maserati and a works Ferrari. During this period, he also married Elsa Giaretto. In her opinion motor sport was a silly and dangerous activity, and she tried to persuade Farina to stop. [13] Three days after their high society wedding, Farina flew to Argentina where he drove his Maserati 8CL to victory in the Gran Premio Internacional del General San Martín. On his return to Europe, he won the Grand Prix des Nations and 1948 Monaco Grand Prix. Using Ferrari's first Grand Prix car, the Ferrari 125, he won the Circuito di Garda before giving the Temporada another visit. This resulted in victory in the Copa Acción San Lorenzo in February 1949. The rest of the year he raced Maseratis for Scuderia Milano and Scuderia Ambrosiana, and at times in his own 4CLT/48. He won the Lausanne Grand Prix and then was re-signed by Alfa Corse. [5] [6] [3] [9] [10] [13] [14] [15] [16] [17]

1950 World Champion

In 1950, Farina returned to Alfa Romeo for the inaugural FIA World Championship of Drivers. The opening race of the season was held at Silverstone Circuit, in front of 150,000 spectators. Farina won, with teammates Luigi Fagioli and Reg Parnell, completing an Alfa Romeo 1-2-3 finish. At Monaco eight days later, a multiple pile-up on the first lap saw Farina spin out of a race that Juan Manuel Fangio went on to win. In the 1950 Swiss Grand Prix, Farina beat his teammate Fagioli into second. The next race, at Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps, saw Fangio beat Fagioli, with Farina finishing in fourth with transmission problems. At this stage, Farina still led the championship on points: Farina 22; Fagioli 18; Fangio 17. [8] [9] [18] [19] [20] [21] [22]

When Fangio won the 1950 French Grand Prix, Farina finished outside of the points in seventh. By the season finale on 3 September, the 1950 Italian Grand Prix, Farina was trailing his teammate by two points. For Alfa, Monza was home territory and so they fielded an additional car for Piero Taruffi and Consalvo Sanesi. It was the Ferrari of Alberto Ascari who put pressure on the Alfas during the early stages of the race, lying in second, in the knowledge that his car only needed one fuel stop to the Alfas' two, but he retired with engine problems. Soon after, Fangio's gearbox failed and Taruffi handed over his car, only for it to drop a valve and retire. Instead, first position and therefore the championship went to Farina. [8] [9] [21] [23] [24]

He continued with Alfa Romeo for the 1951 season, but was beaten by Fangio, who secured the title for the Milanese marque. Farina finished the season in fourth place, with his only world championship victory coming in the 1951 Belgian Grand Prix at the Spa-Francorchamps. Farina switched back to Ferrari for 1952, when Grand Prix racing switched to Formula 2 specification, but had to take second place to team leader Ascari. He won the non-championship Gran Premio di Napoli and Monza Grand Prix. Ascari's total domination of the championship had been a bitter blow to Farina's self-image. [21] He also drove Tony Vandervell's Thinwall Special – a modified Ferrari 375 F1 car to second place in the end-of-season Woodcote Cup at Goodwood. [25] [26] [27] [5] [8] [9] [10] [28]

He remained at Ferrari for the 1953 season. He was involved in a large accident at the first race of the season, the Argentine Grand Prix: President Juan Perón had allowed free access to the race, which meant that the drivers had to race with hordes of spectators lining the circuit, and a young boy ran across the track while Farina was committed to a fast corner, the Curva Nor Este. Farina was forced to take evasive action and swerved into the spectators standing on the exit of the corner, killing seven and injuring many others. [10] [29] [30]

Farina's best result of the season was victory in the 1953 German Grand Prix. He took up the challenge against the works Maserati of Fangio and Mike Hawthorn when Ascari's car lost a wheel. Other non-Championship Formula One victories came in the Gran Premio di Napoli and Grand Prix de Rouen-les-Essarts. By now he had accepted that Ascari and Fangio were faster drivers than him. [10] He nevertheless took a string of podium finishes, gaining third place in the World Championship. This year saw the introduction of the World Sportscar Championship, and as part of the Scuderia Ferrari squad of drivers, Farina made a number of appearances, winning twice. The first came in the 24 Heures de Spa-Francorchamps, when he and Hawthorn had a winning margin of 18 laps, which amounted to about an advantage of close to 90 minutes. The second victory came in the next race, the 1953 1000km of Nürburgring, this time partnered by Ascari, with a smaller margin of just over 15 minutes. He also triumphed in the Daily Express Trophy race at Silverstone in another one-off race in the Thinwall Special. [5] [8] [9] [31] [32] [33]

Although he was now 47, a golden opportunity arose at Ferrari when Ascari left the team, leaving Farina the team leader. After early season results including victories in the 1000 km Buenos Aires sports car race, co-driven by the young Italian Umberto Maglioli, and Syracuse Grand Prix, he crashed heavily in the Mille Miglia whilst leading in his Ferrari 375 Plus. Just seven weeks later, and with his right arm still in plaster, Farina raced in the 1954 Belgian Grand Prix. He was leading before the end of the first lap, dicing with Fangio's Maserati, until the ignition failed on his Ferrari. [5] [8] [34] [35] [36] Later in the season he was badly injured in the Supercortemaggiore Grand Prix, a sports car race at Monza, as a consequence of which he spent 20 days in hospital.

He was back with Ferrari for the start of the 1955 season in Argentina, taking morphine injections to ease the pain. But the heat took its toll on all of the drivers. Farina pitted due to exhaustion, with his Ferrari 625 being taken over by the team's spare driver, Maglioli. When José Froilán González pitted, a revived Farina was sent out in his place. Later in the race, González – who was back in his car – crashed but rejoined and handed the car back to Farina, who brought it home in second. Third place in the 1955 Argentine Grand Prix went to Farina's original car which had been drivern by Maglioli and Maurice Trintignant. After a third place in Belgium, Farina retired mid-season, owing to the continued pain and the death of Ascari.[ citation needed ] He returned for the 1955 Italian Grand Prix, but his Scuderia Ferrari-entered Lancia D50 suffered a tyre failure at 170 mph during a practice session, whilst on the Monza's new banking. The car spun, but Farina stepped out unhurt. Ferrari withdrew the car from the event, and Farina did not start his final Grand Prix. [5] [8] [9] [37] [38]

Farina entered the 1956 Indianapolis 500, with a six-cylinder Ferrari engine installed in a Kurtis Kraft chassis. The car, sponsored by Bardahl, was listed on the entry as a Bardahl-Ferrari. Qualifying for the race was scheduled for four days during May. The second weekend saw heavy rain that cancelled the third day and left only a small amount of time for drivers to contest the remaining spaces of the grid. This meant a few drivers did not get a chance to qualify on the fourth day, and Farina was one of them. Farina elected to race a conventional Indy car in 1957, but he had difficulty getting the car up to speed and experienced some handling problems. His teammate, Keith Andrews, stepped into the car for a test run, but crashed on the front stretch. The car backed into the inside wall and Andrews was crushed to death between the cowl and fuel tank. Farina withdrew from the event and never returned. [5] [6] [8] [9] [39] [40] [41] [42]

Death

Following his retirement, Farina became involved in Alfa Romeo and Jaguar distributorships and later assisted at the Pininfarina factory. [5] [6]

On his way to the 1966 French Grand Prix, Farina lost control of his Lotus Cortina in the Savoy Alps, near Aiguebelle, hit a telegraph pole and was killed instantly. He had been on his way to both watch the race and to take part in filming as the adviser and driving double of the French actor Yves Montand, who played an ex-World Champion in the film Grand Prix . [5] [6] [9] [10] [43] [44]

Racing record

Career highlights

SeasonSeriesPositionTeamCar
1933Coppa Principessa di Piemonte [45] 3rd Alfa Romeo 2300
1934Masarykuv Okruh [46] 1stScuderia Subalpina Maserati 4CM
Giro d'Italia [47] 2nd Lancia Astura V8
Gran Premio de Biella [6] 3rdScuderia Subalpina Maserati 4CM
1935Bergamo GP [6] 2ndScuderia Subalpina Maserati 4CM
Gran Premio de Biella [6] 3rdScuderia Subalpina Maserati 4CM
AIACR European Championship [48] 21st Gino Rovere Maserati 6C-34
1936 Mille Miglia [49] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Alfa Romeo 8C 2900 A
Penya Rhin Grand Prix [6] 3rd Scuderia Ferrari Alfa Romeo 8C-35
Circuito di Milano [6] 3rd Scuderia Ferrari Alfa Romeo 8C-35
Gran Premio di Modena [6] 3rd Scuderia Ferrari Alfa Romeo 8C-35
AIACR European Championship [50] 14th Scuderia Ferrari Alfa Romeo 8C-35
1937Italian Championship [5] 1st Scuderia Ferrari Alfa Romeo 12C-36
Gran Premio di Napoli [51] 1st Scuderia Ferrari Alfa Romeo 12C-36
Mille Miglia [49] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Alfa Romeo 8C 2900 A
Turin Grand Prix [51] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Alfa Romeo 12C-36
Circuito di Milano [52] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Alfa Romeo 12C-36
AIACR European Championship [53] 7th Scuderia Ferrari Alfa Romeo 8C-35
AAA National Championship [54] 7th Scuderia Ferrari Alfa Romeo 8C-35
1938Italian Championship [5] 1st Alfa Corse Alfa Romeo Tipo 316
Pontedecimo-Giovi [55] 1st Alfa Corse Alfa Romeo 2900B MM
Coppa Ciano [51] 2nd Alfa Corse Alfa Romeo Tipo 316
Coppa Acerbo [51] 2nd Alfa Corse Alfa Romeo Tipo 316
Gran Premio d'Italia [56] 2nd Alfa Corse Alfa Romeo Tipo 316
AIACR European Championship [57] 8th Alfa Corse Alfa Romeo Tipo 312
Alfa Romeo Tipo 316
1939Italian Championship [5] 1st Alfa Corse Alfa Romeo 158
GP d'Anvers [58] 1st Alfa Corse Alfa Romeo 8C 2900B/412S
Coppa Ciano [59] 1st Alfa Corse Alfa Romeo 158
Prix de Berne [60] 1st Alfa Corse Alfa Romeo 158
Coppa Acerbo [61] 3rd Alfa Corse Alfa Romeo 158
AIACR European Championship [62] 13th Alfa Corse Alfa Romeo 158
1940 Gran Premio di Tripoli [63] 1st Alfa Corse Alfa Romeo 158
Mille Miglia [64] 2nd Alfa Romeo 6C 2500 SS Spider Touring
1946 Grand Prix des Nations [14] 1st Alfa Romeo 158
1948Gran Premio Internacional del General San Martín [15] 1stScuderia Milano Maserati 8CL
Grand Prix des Nations [16] 1st Maserati 4CLT
Grand Prix Automobile de Monaco [17] 1st Maserati 4CLT
Circuito di Garda [65] 1st Ferrari 125
1949Copa Acción de San Lorenzo [66] 1st Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 125C
Lausanne Grand Prix [67] 1st Maserati 4CLT/48
Grande Prêmio da Cidade de Rio de Janeiro [66] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 125C
Daily Express BRDC International Trophy [68] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 125
1950 FIA Formula World Championship [69] 1st Alfa Romeo SpA Alfa Romeo 158
Alfa Romeo 159
RAC British Grand Prix [70] 1st Alfa Romeo SpA Alfa Romeo 158
Großer Preis der Schweiz [71] 1st Alfa Romeo SpA Alfa Romeo 158
Gran Premio di Bari [72] 1st Alfa Romeo SpA Alfa Romeo 158
Daily Express BRDC International Trophy [73] 1st Alfa Romeo SpA Alfa Romeo 158
Gran Premo d'Italia [74] 1st Alfa Romeo SpA Alfa Romeo 159
Gran Premio Internacional del General San Martín [75] 2ndDott G. Farina Maserati 4CLT
Copa Acción de San Lorenzo [75] 3rdDott G. Farina Maserati 4CLT
1951Grand Prix de Paris [76] 1stScuderia Milano Maserati 4CLT
Ulster Trophy [76] 1st Alfa Romeo SpA Alfa Romeo 159A
Grote Prijs van Belgie [77] 1st Alfa Romeo SpA Alfa Romeo 159A
Woodcote Cup [78] 1st Alfa Romeo SpA Alfa Romeo 159
Festival of Britain Trophy [78] 2ndScuderia Milano Maserati 4CLT
Grand Prix de Pau [76] 3rdScuderia Milano Maserati 4CLT
Großer Preis der Schweiz [79] 3rd Alfa Romeo SpA Alfa Romeo 159A
Gran Premio d'Italia [80] 3rd Alfa Romeo SpA Alfa Romeo 159M
Gran Premio de España [81] 3rd Alfa Romeo SpA Alfa Romeo 159M
FIA Formula One World Championship [82] 4th Alfa Romeo SpA Alfa Romeo 159A
Alfa Romeo 159M
1952 Gran Premio di Napoli [26] 1st Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500
Gran Premio dell'Autodromo di Monza [27] 1st Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500
FIA Formula One World Championship [83] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500
Grands Prix de France [84] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500
Grand Prix de Paris [85] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500
Grote Prijs van Belgie [86] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500
Grand Prix de la Marine [87] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500
Grand Prix de l'ACF [88] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500
Großer Preis von Deutschland [89] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500
Grand Prix de la Comminges [90] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500
Grote Prijs van Nederland [91] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500
Woodcote Cup [92] 2nd G.A. Vandervell Ferrari 375 Thinwall
Gran Premio di Siracusa [93] 3rd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500
1953 Gran Premio Ciudad de Buenos Aires [94] 1st Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500
Gran Premio di Napoli [95] 1st Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500
Grand Prix de Rouen-les-Essarts [96] 1st Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 625
Daily Express Trophy [97] 1st G.A. Vandervell Ferrari Thinwall
24 Heures de Spa Francorchamps [32] 1st Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 375 MM Pinin Farina Berlinetta
Großer Preis von Deutschland [98] 1st Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500
Internationales ADAC-1000 km Rennen Weltmeisterchaftslauf Nürburgring [33] 1st Automobili Ferrari Ferrari 375 MM Vignale Spyder
12 Hours of Casablanca [99] 1st Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 375 MM Berlinetta
Grote Prijs van Nederland [100] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500
Großer Preis der Schweiz [101] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500
Gran Premio d'Italia [102] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500
FIA Formula One World Championship [103] 3rd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500
RAC British Grand Prix [104] 3rd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500
Gran Premio di Monza [105] 3rd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 250 MM Vignale Spyder
1954 1000 km Buenos Aires [34] 1st Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 375 MM
Gran Premio di Siracusa [106] 1st Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 625
Grand Prix d'Agadir [107] 1st Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 375 Plus
Gran Premio de la Republic Argentina [108] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 625
Gran Premio Ciudad de Buenos Aires [109] 3rd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 625
FIA Formula One World Championship [110] 8th Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 625
1955 Gran Premio de la Republic Argentina [111] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 625
Grote Prijs van Belgie [112] 3rd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 625
FIA Formula One World Championship [113] 5th Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 625

Complete European Championship results

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position) (Races in italics indicate fastest lap)

YearEntrantChassisEngine1234567EDCPts
1935 Gino Rovere Maserati 6C-34 Maserati 3.7 L6 MON
Ret
FRA BEL GER 21st51
Dr. G. Farina SUI
8
Scuderia Subalpina Maserati V8RI Maserati 4.8 V8 ITA
DNS
ESP
1936 Scuderia Ferrari Alfa Romeo 8C-35 Alfa Romeo 3.8 L8 MON
Ret
GER SUI
Ret
14th26
Alfa Romeo 12C 1936 Alfa Romeo 4.1 V12 ITA
Ret
1937 Scuderia Ferrari Alfa Romeo 12C-36 Alfa Romeo 4.1 V12 BEL GER
Ret
MON
6
SUI
Ret
ITA
Ret
7th28
1938 Alfa Corse Alfa Romeo Tipo 312 Alfa Romeo 3.0 V12 FRA GER
Ret
SUI
5
8th21
Alfa Romeo Tipo 316 Alfa Romeo 3.0 V16 ITA
2
1939 G. Farina Alfa Romeo Tipo 316 Alfa Romeo 3.0 V16 BEL
Ret
FRA GER 13th25
Alfa Corse Alfa Romeo 158 Alfa Romeo 1.5 L8 SUI
7
Source: [114]

Post-WWII Grandes Épreuves results

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position) (Races in italics indicate fastest lap)

YearEntrantChassisEngine12345
1948 Giuseppe Farina Maserati 4CLT Maserati 4CLT 1.5 L4 s MON
1
SUI
Ret
FRA
Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 125 Ferrari 125 F1 1.5 V12 s ITA
Ret
1949 Giuseppe Farina Maserati 4CLT/48 Maserati 4CLT 1.5 L4 s GBR BEL
Ret
SUI
Ret
Automobiles Talbot-Darracq Talbot-Lago T26C Talbot 23CV 4.5 L6 FRA
Ret
Scuderia Milano Maserati 4CLT/48 Maserati 4CLT 1.5 L4 s ITA
Ret
Source: [115]

Complete Formula One World Championship results

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position, races in italics indicate fastest lap)

YearEntrantChassisEngine123456789WDC Pts [2]
1950 Alfa Romeo SpA Alfa Romeo 158 Alfa Romeo 158 1.5 L8 s GBR
1
MON
Ret
500 SUI
1
BEL
4
FRA
7
1st30
Alfa Romeo 159 ITA
1
1951 Alfa Romeo SpA Alfa Romeo 159 Alfa Romeo 158 1.5 L8 s SUI
3
500 BEL
1
FRA
5
GBR
Ret
GER
Ret
ITA
3*
ESP
3
4th19 (22)
1952 Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500 Ferrari 500 2.0 L4 SUI
Ret
500 BEL
2
FRA
2
GBR
6
GER
2
NED
2
ITA
4
2nd24 (27)
1953 Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500 Ferrari 500 2.0 L4 ARG
Ret
500 NED
2
BEL
Ret
FRA
5
GBR
3
GER
1
SUI
2
ITA
2
3rd26 (32)
1954 Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 625 Ferrari 625 2.5 L4 ARG
2
500 8th6
Ferrari 553 Ferrari 554 2.5 L4 BEL
Ret
FRA GBR GER SUI ITA ESP
DNA
1955 Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 625 Ferrari 555 2.5 L4 ARG
2+3†
5th10 13
MON
4
500
Ferrari 555 BEL
3
NED GBR
Lancia D50 Lancia DS50 2.5 V8 ITA
DNS
1956 Bardahl-Ferrari Kurtis Kraft 500D Ferrari 446 4.5 L6 ARG MON 500
DNQ
BEL FRA GBR GER ITA NC0
* Indicates shared drive with Felice Bonetto
Indicates shared drives with José Froilán González and Maurice Trintignant (2nd place) & Maurice Trintignant and Umberto Maglioli (3rd place)

Non-Championship Formula One results

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position, races in italics indicate fastest lap)

YearEntrantChassisEngine123456789101112131415161718192021222324252627282930313233343536373839
1950 Alfa Romeo SpA Alfa Romeo 158 Alfa Romeo 158 1.5 L8 s PAU RIC SRM PAR EMP BAR
1
JER NAT
6
NOT ULS PES STT INT
1
GOO PEN
Giuseppe Farina Maserati 4CLT/48 Maserati 4CLT 1.5 L4 s ALB
7
NED
1951 Scuderia Milano Maserati 4CLT/48 Maserati 4CLT 1.5 L4 s SYR
Ret
PAU
3
RIC SRM PAR
1
NED
Ret
ALB PES
Maserati 4CLT/50 BOR
Ret
Alfa Romeo SpA Alfa Romeo 159 Alfa Romeo 158 1.5 L8 s INT
9
ULS
1
SCO BAR
Ret
GOO
1
1952 Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500 Ferrari 500 2.0 L4 RIO SYR
3
MAR
Ret
AST INT ELÄ NAP
1
EIF PAR
2*
ALB FRO ULS MNZ
1
LAC ESS MAR
2
SAB
Ret
CAE DMT COM
2
NAT BAU
Ret
MOD
4
CAD SKA MAD AVU JOE NEW RIO
Ferrari 375 Ferrari 375 4.5 V12 VAL
Ret
RIC LAV PAU IBS
1953 Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500 Ferrari 500 2.0 L4 SYR
Ret
PAU
Ret
LAV AST BOR
Ret
INT ELÄ NAP
1
ULS WIN FRO COR EIF ROU
1
STR CRY AVU USF LAC DRE BRI CHE SAB NEW CAD SAC RED SKA LON MOD MAD BER JOE CUR
GA Vandervell Ferrari 375 tw Ferrari 375 4.5 V12 ALB
DNQ
PRI GRE ESS MID
1954 Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 625 Ferrari 625 2.5 L4 SYR
1
PAU
5
LAV BOR INT BAR CUR ROM FRO COR BRC CRY ROU CAE AUG COR OUL RED PES SAC JOE CAD BER GOO DTT
1955 Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 625 Ferrari 555 2.5 L4 VAL
Ret
PAU GLO BOR
Ret
INT NAP ALB CUR COR LON DRT RED DTT OUT AVO SYR
Source: [116] [117]

* Indicates Shared Drive with André Simon

Complete 24 Hours of Le Mans results

YearTeamCo-DriversCarClassLapsPos.Class
Pos.
1953 Flag of Italy.svg Scuderia Ferrari Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Mike Hawthorn Ferrari 340 MM Pininfarina Berlinetta S5.012DSQDSQ

Complete 24 Hours of Spa results

YearTeamCo-DriversCarClassLapsPos.Class
Pos.
1936 Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg Scuderia Ferrari Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg Eugenio Siena Alfa Romeo 8C 2900A Compr.DNFDNF
1953 Flag of Italy.svg Scuderia Ferrari Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Mike Hawthorn Ferrari 375 MM Pininfarina Berlinetta S2601st1st

Complete Mille Miglia results

YearTeamCo-DriversCarClassPos.Class
Pos.
1934 Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg Scuderia Subalpina Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg Luigi Della Chiesa Alfa Romeo 6C 1750 T2.0DNFDNF
1936 Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg Scuderia Ferrari Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg Stefano Meazza Alfa Romeo 8C 2900A +2.0c2nd2nd
1937 Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg Scuderia Ferrari Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg Stefano Meazza Alfa Romeo 8C 2900A S+2.02nd2nd
1938 Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg Alfa Corse Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg Stefano Meazza Alfa Romeo 8C 2900B S3s/4.5DNFDNF
1940 Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg Paride Mambelli Alfa Romeo 6C 2500 SS 3.02nd1st
1953 Flag of Italy.svg Ferrari Spa Flag of Italy.svg Luigi Parenti Ferrari 340 MM Touring Spyder S+2.0DNFDNF
1954 Flag of Italy.svg Scuderia Ferrari Flag of Italy.svg Luigi Parenti Ferrari 375 Plus S+2.0DNFDNF

Complete Carrera Panamericana results

YearTeamCo-DriversCarClassPos.Class
Pos.
1952 Flag of the United States.svg Scuderia Guastella Flag of the United States.svg Bill Spear Ferrari 340 Mexico Vignale Spyder SDNSDNS

Complete 12 Hours of Casablanca results

YearTeamCo-DriversCarClassPos.Class
Pos.
1953 Flag of Italy.svg Scuderia Ferrari Flag of Italy.svg Piero Scotti Ferrari 375 MM S+2.01st1st

Indianapolis 500 results

YearChassisEngineStartFinishTeam
1956 Kurtis Kraft Ferrari DNQ Bardahl

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    Juan Manuel Fangio, nicknamed El Chueco or El Maestro, was an Argentine racing car driver. He dominated the first decade of Formula One racing, winning the World Drivers' Championship five times.

    Mike Hawthorn British racecar driver

    John Michael Hawthorn was a British racing driver. He became the United Kingdom's first Formula One World Champion driver in 1958, whereupon he announced his retirement, having been profoundly affected by the death of his teammate and friend Peter Collins two months earlier in the 1958 German Grand Prix. Hawthorn also won the 1955 24 Hours of Le Mans, but was haunted by his involvement in the disastrous crash that marred the race. Hawthorn died in a road accident three months after retiring; he was allegedly suffering from a terminal illness at the time.

    Alberto Ascari Italian racing driver

    Alberto Ascari was an Italian racing driver and twice Formula One World Champion. He was a multitalented racer who competed in motorcycle racing before switching to cars. Ascari won consecutive world titles in 1952 and 1953 for Scuderia Ferrari. He was the team's first World Champion and the last Italian to date to win the title. This was sandwiched by an appearance in the 1952 Indianapolis 500. Ascari also won the Mille Miglia in 1954. Ascari was noted for the careful precision and finely-judged accuracy that made him one of the safest drivers in a most dangerous era.

    1950 British Grand Prix Formula One motor race held in 1950

    The 1950 British Grand Prix, formally known as The Royal Automobile Club Grand Prix d'Europe Incorporating The British Grand Prix, was a Formula One motor race held on 13 May 1950 at the Silverstone Circuit in Silverstone, England. It was the first World Championship Formula One race, as well as the fifth British Grand Prix, and the third to be held at Silverstone after motor racing resumed after World War II. It was the first race of seven in the 1950 World Championship of Drivers.

    1950 Swiss Grand Prix

    The 1950 Swiss Grand Prix, formally titled the Großer Preis der Schweiz für Automobile, was a Formula One motor race held on 4 June 1950 at Bremgarten. It was race four of seven in the 1950 World Championship of Drivers. The 42-lap race was won by Alfa Romeo driver Nino Farina after he started from second position. His teammate Luigi Fagioli finished second and Talbot-Lago driver Louis Rosier came in third.

    1950 Belgian Grand Prix Formula One motor race

    The 1950 Belgian Grand Prix, formally titled the Grand Prix Automobile de Belgique, was a Formula One motor race held on 18 June 1950 at Spa-Francorchamps. It was race five of seven in the 1950 World Championship of Drivers. The 35-lap race was won by Alfa Romeo driver Juan Manuel Fangio after he started from second position. His teammate Luigi Fagioli finished second and Talbot-Lago driver Louis Rosier came in third.

    1950 Italian Grand Prix Formula One motor race held in 1950

    The 1950 Italian Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held on 3 September 1950 at Autodromo Nazionale di Monza. It was race 7 of 7 in the 1950 World Championship of Drivers. In this race, Nino Farina became the first World Drivers' Champion, and the only driver to win the title in his home country.

    1951 Swiss Grand Prix

    The 1951 Swiss Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at the Bremgarten on 27 May 1951. It was race 1 of 8 in the 1951 World Championship of Drivers. The race saw the Formula One debut of British driver Stirling Moss.

    1951 French Grand Prix Formula One motor race held in 1951

    The 1951 French Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Reims-Gueux on 1 July 1951. It was race 4 of 8 in the 1951 World Championship of Drivers and was won by Juan Manuel Fangio and Luigi Fagioli driving an Alfa Romeo. It was the first of three occasions where two drivers would be credited with a Grand Prix win after sharing a car.

    1951 British Grand Prix Formula One motor race held in 1951

    The 1951 British Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held on 14 July 1951 at the Silverstone Circuit in Northamptonshire, England. It was race 5 of 8 in the 1951 World Championship of Drivers and was contested over 90 laps. The race was the first victory for José Froilán González, and was also the first of many for the Scuderia Ferrari team. Both the team and driver also achieved their first ever pole position during the weekend.

    1951 German Grand Prix Formula One motor race held in 1951

    The 1951 German Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held on 29 July 1951 at the Nürburgring Nordschleife. It was race 6 of 8 in the 1951 World Championship of Drivers.

    1951 Italian Grand Prix Formula One motor race held in 1951

    The 1951 Italian Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held on 16 September 1951 at Monza. It was race 7 of 8 in the 1951 World Championship of Drivers.

    1952 Swiss Grand Prix

    The 1952 Swiss Grand Prix was a Formula Two race held on 18 May 1952 at Bremgarten Circuit. It was the first round of the 1952 World Championship of Drivers, in which each Grand Prix was run to Formula Two rules rather than the Formula One regulations normally used.

    1952 Dutch Grand Prix Formula 1 race

    The 1952 Dutch Grand Prix was a Formula Two race held on 17 August 1952 at the Circuit Zandvoort. It was race 7 of 8 in the 1952 World Championship of Drivers, in which each Grand Prix was run to Formula Two rules rather than the Formula One regulations normally used. The 90-lap race was won by Ferrari driver Alberto Ascari after he started from pole position. His teammates Giuseppe Farina and Luigi Villoresi finished in second and third places.

    1953 Dutch Grand Prix Formula One motor race held in 1953

    The 1953 Dutch Grand Prix was a Formula Two race held on 7 June 1953 at the Circuit Zandvoort. It was race 3 of 9 in the 1953 World Championship of Drivers, which was run to Formula Two rules in 1952 and 1953, rather than the Formula One regulations normally used. The 90-lap race was won by Ferrari driver Alberto Ascari after he started from pole position. His teammate Nino Farina finished second and Maserati drivers José Froilán González and Felice Bonetto came in third

    1951 Formula One season sports season

    The 1951 Formula One season was the fifth season of FIA Formula One motor racing. It featured the 1951 World Championship of Drivers, which commenced on 27 May 1951 and ended on 28 October after eight races. The season also included 14 races that were open to Formula One cars but did not count towards the championship standings.

    1950 Formula One season sports season

    The 1950 Formula One season was the fourth season of the FIA's Formula One motor racing. It featured the inaugural FIA World Championship of Drivers which commenced on 13 May and ended on 3 September, as well as a number of non-championship races. The championship consisted of six Grand Prix races, each held in Europe and open to Formula One cars, plus the Indianapolis 500, which was run to AAA National Championship regulations. Giuseppe Farina won the championship from Juan Manuel Fangio and Luigi Fagioli.

    Peter Collins (racing driver) British racecar driver

    Peter John Collins was a British racing driver. He was killed in the 1958 German Grand Prix, just weeks after winning the RAC British Grand Prix. He started his career as a 17-year-old in 1949, impressing in Formula 3 races, finishing third in the 1951 Autosport National Formula 3 Championship.

    Felice Bonetto racecar driver

    Felice Bonetto was a courageous racing driver who earned the nickname Il Pirata.

    Alfa Romeo 158/159 Alfetta racing automobile

    The Alfa Romeo 158/159, also known as the Alfetta, is a Grand Prix racing car produced by Italian manufacturer Alfa Romeo. It is one of the most successful racing cars ever produced- the 158 and its derivative, the 159, took 47 wins from 54 Grands Prix entered. It was originally developed for the pre-World War II voiturette formula (1937) and has a 1.5-litre straight-8 supercharged engine. Following World War II, the car was eligible for the new Formula One introduced in 1947. In the hands of drivers such as Nino Farina, Juan-Manuel Fangio and Luigi Fagioli, it dominated the first two seasons of the World Championship of Drivers.

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    Further reading

    Sporting positions
    Preceded by
    None
    Formula One World Champion
    1950
    Succeeded by
    Juan Manuel Fangio
    Preceded by
    Hermann Lang
    Gran Premio di Tripoli winner
    1940
    Succeeded by
    None
    Preceded by
    Manfred von Brauchitsch
    1937
    Grand Prix de Monaco winner
    1948
    Succeeded by
    Juan Manuel Fangio
    1950
    Preceded by
    Alberto Ascari
    Grand Premio di Bari winner
    1950
    Succeeded by
    Juan Manuel Fangio
    Preceded by
    Alberto Ascari
    BRDC International Trophy winner
    1950
    Succeeded by
    Reg Parnell
    Preceded by
    Georges Grignard
    Grand Prix de Paris winner
    1951
    Succeeded by
    Piero Taruffi
    Preceded by
    Alberto Ascari
    Gran Premio di Napoli winner
    1952 & 1953
    Succeeded by
    Luigi Musso
    Preceded by
    None
    Gran Premio Ciudad de Buenos Aires winner
    1953
    Succeeded by
    Maurice Trintignant
    Preceded by
    Luigi Chinetti
    Jean Lucas
    1949
    Spa 24 Hours winner
    with Mike Hawthorn

    1953
    Succeeded by
    Robert Crevits
    Gustave Gosselin
    1964
    Records
    Preceded by
    None
    Youngest Grand Prix polesitter
    43 years, 195 days
    (1950 British Grand Prix)
    Succeeded by
    Juan Manuel Fangio
    38 years, 331 days
    (1950 Monaco GP)
    Preceded by
    None
    Youngest Grand Prix
    race winner

    43 years, 195 days
    (1950 British Grand Prix)
    Succeeded by
    Juan Manuel Fangio
    38 years, 331 days
    (1950 Monaco GP)
    Preceded by
    None
    Youngest driver to set
    fastest lap in Formula One

    43 years, 195 days
    (1950 British Grand Prix)
    Succeeded by
    Juan Manuel Fangio
    38 years, 331 days
    (1950 Monaco GP)
    Preceded by
    None
    Most Grand Prix wins
    2 wins
    1st at the 1950 British GP
    Succeeded by
    Juan Manuel Fangio
    6 wins,
    3rd at the 1950 French GP
    Preceded by
    None
    Youngest Formula One
    World Drivers' Champion

    43 years, 308 days
    (1950 season)
    Succeeded by
    Juan Manuel Fangio
    40 years, 126 days
    (1951 season)