Givi Chokheli

Last updated

Givi Chokheli
Personal information
Full name Givi Dmitriyevich Chokheli
Date of birth(1937-06-27)27 June 1937
Place of birth Telavi, Georgian SSR, USSR
Date of death 25 February 1994(1994-02-25) (aged 56)
Place of death Tbilisi, Georgia
Height 1.82 m (6 ft 0 in)
Position(s) Defender
Senior career*
YearsTeamApps(Gls)
1956 Nadikvari Telavi
1956–1965 Dinamo Tbilisi 159 (4)
National team
1960–1962 USSR 19 (0)
Teams managed
1966–1968 Dinamo Tbilisi (assistant)
1969–1970 Dinamo Tbilisi
1971–1972 Dinamo Tbilisi (assistant)
1974 Dinamo Tbilisi
Honours
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only

Givi Dmitriyevich Chokheli (Georgian :გივი ჩოხელი; Russian : Гиви Дмитриевич Чохели) (27 June 1937 in Telavi – 25 February 1994 in Tbilisi) was a Georgian football defender. [1]

Chokheli played most of his career for Dinamo Tbilisi. After ending his playing career he worked in various coaching positions for Dinamo Tbilisi and in 1969-1970 and 1974 was a head coach. He was classified as a Master of Sport of the USSR in 1959.

He played for Soviet Union national team (19 matches), and was a participant at the 1962 FIFA World Cup and at the 1960 UEFA European Football Championship, where the Soviet Union won the gold medal. The Soviet back line was anchored by the famous trio of Chokheli, Anatoli Maslyonkin, and Anatoly Krutikov in the early 1960s. [1]

The statue of Chokheli in front of Municipal Stadium, Telavi. ChokheliStatuteTelavi.JPG
The statue of Chokheli in front of Municipal Stadium, Telavi.

Telavi's Municipal Stadium features a statue of Chokheli in front of it.

Related Research Articles

FC Dinamo Tbilisi professional association football club based in Tbilisi, Georgia

FC Dinamo Tbilisi is a Georgian professional football club based in Tbilisi, Georgia, that competes in the Erovnuli Liga, the top flight of Georgian football.

Telavi Town in Kakheti, Georgia

Telavi is the main city and administrative center of Georgia's eastern province of Kakheti. Its population consists of some 19,629 inhabitants. The city is located on the foothills of the Tsiv-Gombori Range at 500–800 m (1,600–2,600 ft) above sea level.

FC Locomotive Tbilisi Football club

FC Locomotive Tbilisi is a Georgian football club from the capital, Tbilisi. During the existence of the USSR the club was a part of the Lokomotiv Voluntary Sports Society. The club has strong connections with the Georgian Railways.

Kakhaber Tskhadadze is a Georgian football coach and former player.

David Kipiani

David Kipiani was a Georgian football midfielder and manager. Kipiani principally played as a playmaker and is considered one of Georgia's greatest players. He was known for his elegant style of play, dribbling ability and passing range.

Boris Paichadze

Boris Paichadze was a Georgian footballer, who played for FC Dinamo Tbilisi. The largest stadium in Georgia, the Boris Paichadze Stadium in Tbilisi, is named after him. In 2001, he was voted the best Georgian football player of the 20th century.

FC Dinamo Sukhumi Football club based in Sokhumi, Georgia

FC Dinamo Sokhumi is a Georgian association football club from Sokhumi, Georgia, temporarily based in Tbilisi.

Gavriil Kachalin

Gavriil Dmitriyevich Kachalin was a Soviet/Russian football player and coach.

Football is a major sport in Abkhazia. During Soviet times, the main club within Abkhazia itself was FC Dinamo Sukhumi, but Abkhazian footballers were prominent in the Georgian team FC Dinamo Tbilisi and in other Soviet teams. In 1994, after its declaration of independence from Georgia, Abkhazia organised a nine-team amateur league.

Slava Metreveli

Slava Kalistratovich Metreveli was a Soviet and Georgian football player manager.

Aleksandre Chivadze

Aleksandre Chivadze, is a former Georgian and Soviet football player and coach.

Otar Korkia Georgian basketball player and coach

Otar Korkia was a Georgian professional basketball player and coach. He was named one of FIBA's 50 Greatest Players, in 1991. He was also named the Best Georgian Basketball Player of the 20th Century, and the Best Georgian Sportsman of the 20th Century.

Ramaz Shengelia

Ramaz Shengelia was a Georgian and Soviet football player.

Mikheil Meskhi

Mikheil Meskhi was a Georgian footballer. Nicknamed the "Georgian Garrincha" for his dazzling wing play, he was a creative force on the left flank for the Soviet Union. He was invited by the World XI side via the USSR Football Federation who replied he was injured and couldn't play— he was not told of the invitation.

Vladimir Gutsaev

Vladimir Gutsaev is a retired Soviet and Georgian footballer and coach of Ossetian ethnicity. He was a member of the Parliament of Georgia from the ruling United National Movement party from 2004 to 2008.

Manuchar Machaidze is a Georgian former footballer who played as a midfielder for Dinamo Tbilisi, Pakhtakor Tashkent, Spartak Moscow and Torpedo Kutaisi during his club career, and is most famous for his time at Dinamo Tbilisi, which were a powerful and successful club – ever present at the highest level of Soviet football, where he won numerous accolades. His younger brother, Gocha Machaidze, also a footballer, served as a prolific defender and defensive midfielder for the same clubs as him.

Ioseb "Soso" Irodis dze Grishikashvili is a Georgian goalkeeper. He has played for Georgian club Dinamo Tbilisi. He also played for FK Ventspils, FK Baku. He has played for Georgia national football team and has won 10 caps, all in friendlies. He is the player of FC MIKA, since August 2008.

Vasily Nikolayevich Sokolov was a Russian football defender and coach.

The 2019 Erovnuli Liga or Crystalbet Erovnuli Liga 2019 was the 31st season of top-tier football in Georgia. Saburtalo Tbilisi were the defending champions. The season began on 1 March 2019 and ended on 1 December 2019.

Archil Kiknadze, was a Georgian and Soviet football player and manager.

References

  1. 1 2 "Футбольный феномен 1937-го (The 1937 Football Phenomenon, Part I)" (in Russian). The Evening, Moscow. 23 August 2007. Archived from the original on 17 April 2013. Retrieved 11 July 2008.