Glen Skov

Last updated
Glen Skov
1959 Topps Glen Skov.JPG
Born(1931-01-26)January 26, 1931
Wheatley, Ontario, Canada
Died September 10, 2013(2013-09-10) (aged 82)
Palm Harbor, Florida, U.S.
Height 6 ft 1 in (185 cm)
Weight 185 lb (84 kg; 13 st 3 lb)
Position Center
Shot Left
Played for Detroit Red Wings
Playing career 19471961

Glen Frederick Skov (January 26, 1931 – September 10, 2013) was a centre in the NHL who played for 12 seasons for the Detroit Red Wings, Chicago Black Hawks and Montreal Canadiens and is the younger brother of former referee Art Skov. He won 3 Stanley Cups with Detroit in 1952, 1954, 1955.

National Hockey League North American professional ice hockey league

The National Hockey League is a professional ice hockey league in North America, currently comprising 31 teams: 24 in the United States and 7 in Canada. The NHL is considered to be the premier professional ice hockey league in the world, and one of the major professional sports leagues in the United States and Canada. The Stanley Cup, the oldest professional sports trophy in North America, is awarded annually to the league playoff champion at the end of each season.

Detroit Red Wings Hockey team of the National Hockey League

The Detroit Red Wings are a professional ice hockey team based in Detroit. They are members of the Atlantic Division of the Eastern Conference of the National Hockey League (NHL) and are one of the Original Six teams of the league. Founded in 1926, the team was known as the Detroit Cougars until 1930. For the 1930–31 and 1931–32 seasons the team was called the Detroit Falcons, and in 1932 changed their name to the Red Wings.

Chicago Blackhawks Hockey team of the National Hockey League

The Chicago Blackhawks are a professional ice hockey team based in Chicago, Illinois. They are members of the Central Division of the Western Conference of the National Hockey League (NHL). They have won six Stanley Cup championships since their founding in 1926. The Blackhawks are one of the "Original Six" NHL teams along with the Detroit Red Wings, Montreal Canadiens, Toronto Maple Leafs, Boston Bruins and New York Rangers. Since 1994, the club's home rink is the United Center, which they share with the National Basketball Association's Chicago Bulls. The club had previously played for 65 years at Chicago Stadium.

Contents

Glen split his first two seasons between Detroit and the minor leagues before playing four full seasons with Detroit. He then moved to Chicago where he played for five seasons. His final season comprised a mere 3 games with the Montreal Canadiens. He died on September 10, 2013 in Palm Harbor, Florida. [1] [2] [3]

Career statistics

   Regular season   Playoffs
Season TeamLeagueGP G A Pts PIM GPGAPtsPIM
1946–47 Windsor Spitfires OHA-Jr. 20000
1947–48 Detroit Hettche IHL 18448885386
1948–49 Windsor SpitfiresOHA-Jr.351612284240002
1948–49 Windsor Ryancretes IHL11279430660
1949–50 Detroit Red Wings NHL 20000
1950–51 Detroit Red WingsNHL1976131360000
1950–51 Omaha Knights USHL 4526335955
1951–52 Detroit Red WingsNHL7012142648814516
1952–53 Detroit Red WingsNHL701215275461012
1953–54 Detroit Red WingsNHL70171027951212316
1954–55 Detroit Red WingsNHL7014163053112028
1955–56 Chicago Black Hawks NHL707202726
1956–57 Chicago Black HawksNHL6714284269
1957–58 Chicago Black HawksNHL7017183535
1958–59 Chicago Black HawksNHL70358462134
1959–60 Chicago Black HawksNHL693471640002
1960–61 Montréal Canadiens NHL30000
1960–61 Hull-Ottawa Canadiens EPHL 6716264224142682
NHL totals65010613624241353771448

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References

  1. "Glen Skov Obituary - Palm Harbor, Florida". Obitsforlife.com. Archived from the original on 2016-03-04. Retrieved 2013-09-14.
  2. "Glen Skov, winner of 3 Stanley Cups with Detroit Red Wings, dies | Detroit Free Press". freep.com. 2013-03-09. Retrieved 2013-09-14.
  3. Bob Duff. "Ex-Wing Skov starred on three Cup winners | Windsor Star". Blogs.windsorstar.com. Retrieved 2013-09-14.