Go-Stop

Last updated
Go-Stop
Alternative namesGodori, Matgo (when only two players are playing)
Typepair matching, with point scoring
Players2-4, usually 4
Skills required Probabilistic analysis, Strategic thought, bluffing to a lesser extent
Cards48 cards, though sometimes special cards may be added
Deck "Hwatu" cards
PlayCounter-clockwise
Playing time~10 to 15 minutes per round
Random chanceMedium

Go-Stop (Korean : 고스톱; RR : Goseutop), also called Godori (Korean : 고도리, after the winning move in the game) is a Korean fishing card game played with a hanafuda deck (in Korean, hwatu (Korean : 화투)). The game can be called Matgo (Korean : 맞고) when only two players are playing.

Contents

The game is derived from similar Japanese fishing games such as Hana-awase and Hachihachi, though the Japanese hanafuda game Koi-koi is in turn partially derived from Go-Stop. [1]

Modern Korean-produced hwatu decks usually includes bonus cards specifically intended for play with Go-Stop, unlike Japanese hanafuda decks. Typically there are two or three players, although there is a variation where four players can play. The objective of this game is to score a minimum predetermined number of points, usually three or seven, and then call a "Go" or a "Stop", where the name of the game derives. When a "Go" is called, the game continues, and the number of points or amount of money is first increased, and then doubled, tripled, quadrupled and so on. A player calling "Go" risks another player scoring the minimum and winning all the points themselves. If a "Stop" is called, the game ends and the caller collects their winnings.

Setup

Hwatu cards and suits
SuitType
Bright
Animal
Ribbon
Junk
Double
Junk
쌍피
January
송학
Hwatu January gwang.svg   Hwatu January tti.svg Hwatu January pi 1.svg Hwatu January pi 2.svg  
February
매화
  Hwatu February yul.svg Hwatu February tti.svg Hwatu February pi 1.svg Hwatu February pi 2.svg  
March
벚꽃
Hwatu March gwang.svg   Hwatu March tti.svg Hwatu March pi 1.svg Hwatu March pi 2.svg  
April
등꽃
  Hwatu April yul.svg Hwatu April tti.svg Hwatu April pi 1.svg Hwatu April pi 2.svg  
May
난초
  Hwatu May tti.svg Hwatu May pi 1.svg Hwatu May pi 2.svg Hwatu May yul ssang pi.svg
June
모란
  Hwatu June yul.svg Hwatu June tti.svg Hwatu June pi 1.svg Hwatu June pi 2.svg  
July
흑싸리
  Hwatu July yul.svg Hwatu July tti.svg Hwatu July pi 1.svg Hwatu July pi 2.svg  
August
공산
Hwatu August gwang.svg Hwatu August yul.svg   Hwatu August pi 1.svg Hwatu August pi 2.svg  
September
국화
  Hwatu September tti.svg Hwatu September pi 1.svg Hwatu September pi 2.svg Hwatu September yul ssang pi.svg
October
단풍
  Hwatu October yul.svg Hwatu October tti.svg Hwatu October pi 1.svg Hwatu October pi 2.svg  
November
오동
Hwatu November gwang.svg    Hwatu November pi 1.svg Hwatu November pi 2.svg Hwatu November ssang pi.svg
December
Hwatu December gwang.svg Hwatu December yul.svg Hwatu December tti.svg Hwatu December ssang pi.svg
Notes:

 The 'Animal' cards for May and September may be counted as "double junk" cards
 The 'Ribbon' card for December is not counted as a ribbon card

In order to select a dealer (;seon; lit. 'line'), each player picks random cards from the deck and the person who chooses the earliest or latest month card becomes the dealer, depending on whether it is nighttime or daytime, with nighttime favoring the earliest month card, i.e. January, and the latest month card favored during daytime, i.e. December. (밤일낮장) Before the cards are dealt, the dealer shuffles the cards by holding the deck in the left hand with the cards face-down and pulling out random stacks of cards with the right hand to stack them on top. The dealer must repeat this process several times in order to shuffle the cards sufficiently. After shuffling, the dealer holds the deck out to the player to their left in order for them to cut the deck. If there are only two players, the opponent cuts the deck.

Deal

The remaining cards are placed face down on top of the cut portion of the deck in the center of the table to form a draw pile. Before the play begins, the players check for sets of two, three or four cards of the same month on the table. If there is a set, they pile it up on top of each other, usually leaving space on each of the top part of the cards.

Gameplay

  1. Play begins with the dealer and continues counterclockwise.
  2. A turn begins with a player attempting to match one of the cards lying face-up on the table with a card of the same month in their hand. If there are two cards of the same month already on the table, the player may select one of them. If the player has no cards matching the cards on the table, the player discards a card to the table.
  3. The turn continues with the player flipping over the top card from the draw pile and looking for a card of the same month on the table. If the player locates a matching card on the table, the player collects both cards along with the cards matched in step 2. Otherwise, the drawn card is added to the table.
  4. If the card drawn from the top of the draw pile in step 3 matches the two cards matched in step 2, the three cards remain on the table. This is known as ppeok (;ppeog). The three cards remain until a player collects them using the fourth card of the same month.
  5. If a player draws a card which matches the card discarded in step 2, the player collects both cards as well as one junk card (pi) from each opponent's stock pile. This is known as chok.
  6. If a player plays a card in step 2 for which two matching cards are already on the table, and then draws the fourth matching card from the draw pile in step 3, the player collects all four cards as well as one junk card (pi) from each opponent's stock pile. This is known as ttadak. [3]
  7. The object of the game is to create scoring combinations to accumulate points up to a score of either three (for three players) or seven (for two players), at which point a "Go" or a "Stop" must be called.
  8. A game that ends with neither a "Go" nor "Stop" call is called a Nagari game (나가리;nagali). The dealer and play order of the following game remain the same as with the Nagari game, and when the game ends, the loser owes double money to the winner.

Additional rules

Point system

There are several ways to collect points in Go-Stop.

Bright (;gwang)
Hwatu January gwang.svg
Jan
송학
Hwatu March gwang.svg
Mar
벚꽃
Hwatu August gwang.svg
Aug
공산
Hwatu November gwang.svg
Nov
오동
Hwatu December gwang.svg
Dec
Ribbon (;tti)
Hwatu January tti.svg
 Jan 
송학
Hwatu February tti.svg
 Feb 
매화
Hwatu March tti.svg
 Mar 
벚꽃
Hwatu April tti.svg
 Apr 
등꽃
Hwatu May tti.svg
 May 
난초
Hwatu June tti.svg
 Jun 
모란
Hwatu July tti.svg
 Jul 
흑싸리
Hwatu September tti.svg
 Sep 
국화
Hwatu October tti.svg
 Oct 
단풍
  •  Red poetry (홍단;hong dan) : Jan, Feb, Mar
  •  Red (초단;cho dan) : Apr, May, Jul
  •  Blue (청단;cheong dan) : Jun, Sep, Oct
Animal (;kkeus)
Hwatu February yul.svg
 Feb 
매화
Hwatu April yul.svg
 Apr 
등꽃
Hwatu May yul ssang pi.svg
 May 
난초
Hwatu June yul.svg
Jun
모란
Hwatu July yul.svg
Jul
흑싸리
Hwatu August yul.svg
 Aug 
공산
Hwatu September yul ssang pi.svg
 Sep 
국화
Hwatu October yul.svg
Oct
단풍
Hwatu December yul.svg
Dec
  •  Five birds (고도리;godori) : Feb, Apr, Aug
  •  May use as double junk : May, Sep
Double junk (쌍피;ssang pi)
Hwatu May yul ssang pi.svg
 May 
난초
Hwatu September yul ssang pi.svg
 Sep 
국화
Hwatu November ssang pi.svg
Nov
오동
Hwatu December ssang pi.svg
Dec
 Animal cards as double junk : May, Sep

Ending the game

When a player accumulates at least three (for three players) or seven (for two players) points, the player must decide if they will continue that hand by calling "Go" (;go) or end the hand by calling "Stop" (스톱;seutob). If a player says “Go" once, the player must increase their score by at least one point in order to be given another opportunity to call “Go” or “Stop.” A player who calls “Go” once has one point added to their final score. With two “Go”s, two points are added. With the third “Go,” the score is doubled. After the third “Go” (in which the score is multiplied by two), the score is multiplied by the number one less than the number of times the winner has called “Go.” However, before calling “Go,” the winner must consider whether another player may increase their score to at least three or seven points within the next turn.

When “Stop” is called, any non-winning players who have called "Go" will have their penalty (calculated from the winning player's total points) doubled. This is called go bak. If a non-winning player has no Bright cards when the winner has accumulated points by collecting Bright cards, the player without Bright cards will have their penalty doubled. This is known as gwang bak. Further, if a non-winning player has fewer than six junk cards and the winner has accumulated points by collecting junk cards, the non-winning player will have their penalty doubled. This is known as pi bak. All of these are cumulative.

As an example, if a player accumulates seven or more points through only Ribbon cards and Animal cards, the player may then call "Go." If, however, before the first player is given another opportunity to call "Go" or "Stop" another player accumulates at least seven points through both Bright cards and junk cards and subsequently calls "Stop," the first player would be subject to go bak, gwang bak and pi bak. Thus, the player's penalty would be doubled three times, in other words, multiplied by eight. [3]

Gambling

The game is commonly used as a light form of gambling. Though the game can be played without money being involved, the game is considered more entertaining with the gambling aspect included, with households commonly playing at 100 per point. However, any amount can be assigned to the point.

The game is played with great caution outside of the family household, if ever played, as the gambling aspect brings in distrust through cheating, including the hiding of cards and the introduction of foreign cards to improve a hand, as common examples.

See also

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References

  1. Ebashi, Takashi (2014). Hanafuda. Hōsei Daigaku Shuppankyoku. p. 274.
  2. "Rules of Card Games: Go Stop". www.pagat.com.
  3. 1 2 3 "Go-Stop rules". www.sloperama.com.