Goaltending

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Noah Vonleh's goaltending violation gives Nigel Williams-Goss a layup at the 2013 McDonald's All-American Boys Game. 20130403 MCDAAG Noah Vonleh's goaltending gives Nigel Williams-Goss a layup.JPG
Noah Vonleh's goaltending violation gives Nigel Williams-Goss a layup at the 2013 McDonald's All-American Boys Game.

In basketball, goaltending is the violation of interfering with the ball while it is on its way to the basket and it is (a) in a downward flight (b) above the basket ring and within the imaginary cylinder and (c) not touching the rim. [1] [2] [3] [4] In the NCAA and (W)NBA, goaltending is also called if the ball has already touched the backboard while being above the height of the rim in its flight, regardless of it being in an upward or downward flight or whether it is directly above the rim. [5] [6] Goaltending in this context defines by exclusion what is considered a legal block of a field goal. In high school and NCAA basketball, goaltending is also called when a player interferes with a free throw at any time in its flight towards the basket. [1] [7] If goaltending is called for interference with a field goal, the shooting team is awarded the points for the field goal as if it had been made. The team who commits the violation then inbounds the ball at its baseline, the same as if it had conceded a basket. In high school and NCAA basketball, if goaltending is called on a free throw, the shooting team is awarded one point and a technical foul is called against the offending player. [8] [9]

Goaltending is commonly confused with the related violation of basket interference (also called offensive goaltending) which occurs during an attempted field goal when a player touches the basket, the rim, or the ball when it is on the rim or directly above it. Like goaltending, basket interference when committed by the defending team results in an award of points to the shooting team as if the attempted field goal had been made.

FIBA rules allow a defender to block any shot that is over the rim and the ball is on its upward flight.

The prohibition against goaltending was adopted by the NCAA in 1944 (and later by the NBL) specifically because of George Mikan. Prior to the advent of the high-jumping 6 ft 10 in (2.08 m) Mikan, goaltending was not addressed because it was thought physically impossible. [10]

It is possible for a team to goaltend at the buzzer, although this is very rare. This is because, according to (W)NBA rules, once the shot is taken, the period will be over, so goaltending rules would still apply even after the clock hits zero. It happened in the 2012–13 season when Jermaine O'Neal was called for a goaltend against the Houston Rockets after time expired. This happened in the fourth quarter, so the Phoenix Suns lost the game 101–98.

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George Mikan American basketball player, coach, commissioner

George Lawrence Mikan Jr., nicknamed "Mr. Basketball", was an American professional basketball player for the Chicago American Gears of the National Basketball League (NBL) and the Minneapolis Lakers of the NBL, the Basketball Association of America (BAA) and the National Basketball Association (NBA). Invariably playing with thick, round spectacles, the 6 ft 10 in (2.08 m), 245 lb (111 kg) Mikan is seen as one of the greatest basketball players of all time, as well as one of the pioneers of professional basketball, redefining it as a game of so-called big men with his prolific rebounding, shot blocking, and his talent to shoot over smaller defenders with his ambidextrous hook shot, the result of the eponymous Mikan Drill. He also utilized the underhanded free-throw shooting technique long before Rick Barry made it his signature shot.

Goal (sports)

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Shot clock

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Rules of basketball

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Block (basketball) In basketball, the action of a defensive player legally deflecting a field goal attempt from an offensive player to prevent a score

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Flagrant foul

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Glossary of basketball terms Wikipedia glossary

This glossary of basketball terms is a list of definitions of terms used in the game of basketball. Like any other major sport, basketball features its own extensive vocabulary of unique words and phrases used by players, coaches, sports journalists, commentators, and fans.

In basketball, the five-second rule, or five-second violation, is a rule that helps promote continuous play. There are multiple situations where a five-second violation may occur.

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Key (basketball) Area on a basketball court

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In basketball, basket interference is the violation of (a) touching the ball or any part of the basket while the ball is on the rim of the basket, (b) touching the ball when it is within the cylinder extending upwards from the rim, (c) reaching up through the basket from below and touching the ball, whether it is inside or outside the cylinder, or (d) pulling down on the rim of the basket so that it contacts the ball before returning to its original position, or during a shot attempt.. How the ball gets into the cylinder or onto the basket is irrelevant under high school and NCAA rules; e.g., a pass touched within the cylinder is basket interference, even though such a play may not score a goal. This similar play under (W)NBA rules would not be basket interference.

Basketball is a ball game and team sport in which two teams of five players try to score points by throwing or "shooting" a ball through the top of a basketball hoop while following a set of rules. Since being developed by James Naismith as a non-contact game that almost anyone can play, basketball has undergone many different rule variations, eventually evolving into the NBA-style game known today. Basketball is one of the most popular and widely viewed sports in the world.

Basketball is a team sport in which two teams of five players try to score points by throwing or "shooting" a ball through the top of a basketball hoop while following a set of rules. Basketball is one of the most popular and widely viewed sports in the world.

Cherry picking, in basketball and certain other sports, refers to play where one player does not play defense with the rest of the team but remains near the opponents' goal.

References

  1. 1 2 Struckhoff, Mary, ed. (2009). 2009-2010 NFHS Basketball Rules. Indianapolis, Indiana: National Federation of High Schools. p. 31. Rule 4, Section 22
  2. NBA Official Rules (2009-2010) Rule 11, Section I, f. Retrieved July 26, 2010
  3. https://official.nba.com/trigger/goaltending-basket-interference/
  4. 2009-2011 Men's & Women's Basketball Rules Archived 2012-08-06 at the Wayback Machine Rule 4, Section 34, Article 1, a,b. Retrieved July 26, 2010
  5. 2009-2011 Men's & Women's Basketball Rules Archived 2012-08-06 at the Wayback Machine Rule 4, Section 34, Article 3. Retrieved July 26, 2010
  6. NBA Official Rules (2009-2010) Rule 11, Section I, c, d. Retrieved July 26, 2010
  7. 2009-2011 Men's & Women's Basketball Rules Archived 2012-08-06 at the Wayback Machine Rule 4, Section 34, Article 2. Retrieved July 26, 2010
  8. 2009-2011 Men's & Women's Basketball Rules Archived 2012-08-06 at the Wayback Machine Rule 9, Section 17, Article 1, b. Retrieved July 26, 2010
  9. Struckhoff, Mary, ed. (2009). 2009-2010 NFHS Basketball Rules. Indianapolis, Indiana: National Federation of High Schools. p. 60. Rule 10, Section 3, Article 9
  10. "George Lawrence Mikan Jr". NBA Encyclopedia – Playoff Edition. National Basketball Association. Retrieved December 22, 2014.