God Needs Men

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God Needs Men
God Needs Men.jpg
Film poster
Directed by Jean Delannoy
Written by Jean Aurenche
Pierre Bost
Based onUn recteur de l'Île de Sein by Henri Queffelec
Produced by Paul Graetz
Starring Pierre Fresnay
Madeleine Robinson
Daniel Gélin
Cinematography Robert Lefebvre
Edited byJames Cuenet
Music by René Cloërec
Production
company
Transcontinental Films
Distributed by Twentieth Century Fox
Release date
  • 4 October 1950 (1950-10-04)
Running time
100 minutes
CountryFrance
LanguageFrench

God Needs Men (French: Dieu a besoin des hommes) is a 1950 French historical drama film directed by Jean Delannoy and starring Pierre Fresnay, Madeleine Robinson and Daniel Gélin. The film is based on a 1944 novel Un recteur de l'Île de Sein by Henri Queffelec. It was shot at the Billancourt Studios in Paris. Location shooting took place on the Île de Sein off Finistère in Brittany. The film's sets were designed by the art director René Renoux.

Contents

It was originally due to be the French entry at the 1950 Venice Film Festival but it was withdrawn due to fears that its subject might offend the Catholic Church. However, due to its popularity, including amongst Catholics, it was accepted for screening at the Festival anyway. [1] At the 1951 Berlin Film Festival it won the Special Prize for an Excellent Film Achievement. [2]

Plot

On a rugged, poverty stricken island off the coast of Brittany many of the inhabitants spend their time as wreckers preying on shipwrecks. Their wildness forces the parish priest to take refuge on the mainland. A fisherman steps forwards to take his place and tries to uphold religion on the island.

Cast

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References

  1. Johnson p.295
  2. "1st Berlin International Film Festival: Prize Winners". berlinale.de. Retrieved 20 December 2009.

Bibliography