Gondomar S.C.

Last updated
Gondomar
Full nameGondomar Sport Clube
Founded1 May 1921
Ground São Miguel, Gondomar,
Portugal
Capacity2450
ChairmanÁlvaro Cerqueira
ManagerAmerico Soares
League Campeonato de Portugal
2019–20 Group B, 14th
Website Club website

Gondomar Sport Club is a Portuguese football club based in Gondomar, Porto District. Founded on 1 May 1921, it currently plays in the fourth-tier Campeonato de Portugal, holding home games at Estádio de São Miguel , with a capacity of 2.450 spectators.

Contents

History

Gondomar's early foundations were established on 1 August 1928, as the club registered in the Porto Football Association. In 1932, however, it ceased all activity, until a group of people dubbed Os Teimosos de Gondomar (Stubborn), ten years later, took it upon themselves to resurrect the club, which return to organized football in 1960, in the third regional division; promotion to the second regional level was achieved five years later.

In 1970, Gondomar moved to the new Estádio de São Miguel . On 27 October 1986, the team participated for the first time in the Portuguese Cup, losing 1–2 at F.C. Marco. In 2003, whilst competing in the third division, it made nationwide headlines after eliminating Benfica in the fourth round, with a 1–0 win at the Estádio da Luz. [1]

One year later, Gondomar reached the second level for the first time in its history. In the 2006–07 season, the club achieved its best-ever classification in the category, finishing fifth.

In 2009, after ranking 16th and last, Gondomar returned to the third level.

League and cup history

SeasonIIIIIIIVVPts.Pl.WLTGSGADiff.
1994–95 1232 pts3410121235350
1995–96 263 pts3419696825+43
1997–98 848 pts34146145053−3
1998–99 1830 pts3479183253−21
2003–04 186 pts3627546925+44
2004–05 1639 pts34116173845−7
2005–06 651 pts34149115641+15
2006–07 545 pts30136113330+3
2007–08 1235 pts3098133151−20
2008–09 1630 pts3079142935−6
2009–10 4........................

Honours

Managers

Stadium

A view of Estadio de Sao Miguel. Estadio de Sao Miguel.PNG
A view of Estádio de São Miguel.

Logo history

See also

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References

  1. Glorious Benfica (Glorious Benfica); Glória Vermelha (in Portuguese)