Gordon R. Dickson

Last updated
Gordon Rupert Dickson
Gordon R. Dickson (Minicon 1974).jpg
Dickson lecturing at Minicon in 1974
Born(1923-11-01)November 1, 1923
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
DiedJanuary 31, 2001(2001-01-31) (aged 77)
Richfield, Minnesota, United States
OccupationWriter
Nationality Canadian American
Period1950–2001
Genre Science fiction, fantasy
Notable works Childe Cycle

Gordon Rupert Dickson (November 1, 1923 – January 31, 2001) was a Canadian-American science fiction writer. He was inducted into the Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame in 2000. [1]

Canadians citizens of Canada

Canadians are people identified with the country of Canada. This connection may be residential, legal, historical or cultural. For most Canadians, several of these connections exist and are collectively the source of their being Canadian.

Science fiction Genre of speculative fiction

Science fiction is a genre of speculative fiction, typically dealing with imaginative and futuristic concepts such as advanced science and technology, space exploration, time travel, and extraterrestrial life. Science fiction often explores the potential consequences of scientific and other innovations, and has been called a "literature of ideas."

Contents

Biography

Dickson was born in Edmonton, Alberta, in 1923. After the death of his father, he moved with his mother to Minneapolis, Minnesota, in 1937. [2] He served in the United States Army, from 1943 to 1946, and received a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Minnesota, in 1948. From 1948 through 1950 he attended the University of Minnesota for graduate work.[ citation needed ] His first published speculative fiction was the short story "Trespass!", written jointly with Poul Anderson, in the Spring 1950 issue of Fantastic Stories Quarterly (ed. Sam Merwin), the inaugural number of Fantastic Story Magazine as it came to be titled. Next year three of his solo efforts were published by John W. Campbell in Astounding Science Fiction and one appeared in Planet Stories . Anderson and Dickson also inaugurated the Hoka series with "The Sheriff of Canyon Gulch" ( Other Worlds Science Stories , May 1951). [3]

Minnesota State of the United States of America

Minnesota is a state in the Upper Midwest and northern regions of the United States. Minnesota was admitted as the 32nd U.S. state on May 11, 1858, created from the eastern half of the Minnesota Territory. The state has a large number of lakes, and is known by the slogan the "Land of 10,000 Lakes". Its official motto is L'Étoile du Nord.

University of Minnesota public research university in Minneapolis and Saint Paul, Minnesota, United States

The University of Minnesota, Twin Cities is a public research university in Minneapolis and Saint Paul, Minnesota. The Minneapolis and St. Paul campuses are approximately 3 miles (4.8 km) apart, and the St. Paul campus is actually in neighboring Falcon Heights. It is the oldest and largest campus within the University of Minnesota system and has the sixth-largest main campus student body in the United States, with 50,943 students in 2018-19. The university is the flagship institution of the University of Minnesota system, and is organized into 19 colleges and schools, with sister campuses in Crookston, Duluth, Morris, and Rochester.

Dickson's series of novels include the Childe Cycle and the Dragon Knight. He won three Hugo awards and one Nebula award.

The Childe Cycle is an unfinished series of science fiction novels by Canadian writer Gordon R. Dickson. The name Childe Cycle is an allusion to "Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came", a poem by Robert Browning, which provided considerable inspiration for elements in Dickson's magnum opus.

The Dragon Knight is a series of fantasy novels begun in 1976 by American writer Gordon R. Dickson. The first book, based on the short story "St. Dragon and the George", was loosely adapted in the 1982 animated movie The Flight of Dragons by Rankin/Bass. The title here refers in part to an in-universe nomenclature, wherein the story's dragons use the name "george" as a synonym or substitute of "human", after 'St. George the Dragon-Slayer', and in part a reference to the latter.

For a great part of his life, he suffered from the effects of asthma. He died of complications from severe asthma. [4]

Asthma long-term disease involving poor airflow in the lungs

Asthma is a common long-term inflammatory disease of the airways of the lungs. It is characterized by variable and recurring symptoms, reversible airflow obstruction, and bronchospasm. Symptoms include episodes of wheezing, coughing, chest tightness, and shortness of breath. These may occur a few times a day or a few times per week. Depending on the person, they may become worse at night or with exercise.

Character as an author

John Clute has characterized Dickson as a "gregarious, engaging, genial, successful man of letters", who had not been an introvert. [5] Clute considers Dickson a science fiction romantic. [5] Nevertheless, Clute stresses in connection to Dickson that science fiction welcomes "images of heightened solitude, romantically vague, limitless landscapes, and an anguished submission to afflatus", due to its origin in Gothic fiction. [2]

John Clute Canadian literary critic

John Frederick Clute is a Canadian-born author and critic specializing in science fiction and fantasy literature who has lived in both England and the United States since 1969. He has been described as "an integral part of science fiction's history" and "perhaps the foremost reader-critic of sf in our time, and one of the best the genre has ever known."


Gothic fiction, which is largely known by the subgenre of Gothic horror, is a genre or mode of literature and film that combines fiction and horror, death, and at times romance. Its origin is attributed to English author Horace Walpole, with his 1764 novel The Castle of Otranto, subtitled "A Gothic Story". The effect of Gothic fiction feeds on a pleasing sort of terror, an extension of Romantic literary pleasures that were relatively new at the time of Walpole's novel. It originated in England in the second half of the 18th century where, following Walpole, it was further developed by Clara Reeve, Ann Radcliffe, William Thomas Beckford and Matthew Lewis. The genre had much success in the 19th century, as witnessed in prose by Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and the works of Edgar Allan Poe as well as Charles Dickens with his novella, A Christmas Carol, and in poetry in the work of Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and Lord Byron. Another well known novel in this genre, dating from the late Victorian era, is Bram Stoker's Dracula. The name Gothic, which originally referred to the Goths, and then came to mean "German", refers to the medieval Gothic architecture, in which many of these stories take place. This extreme form of Romanticism was very popular throughout Europe, especially among English- and German-language writers and artists. The English Gothic novel also led to new novel types such as the German Schauerroman and the French Roman Noir.

Style

Clute points out that Dickson, like Poul Anderson, with whom he collaborated in the Hoka series, "[tends] to infuse an austere Nordic pathos into wooded, rural midwestern American settings". [5] His works often have mercenaries as their protagonists and deal with aliens that are "less deracinated and more lovable than humans" (Clute). [5] They "are inclined to take on a heightened, sagalike complexion" (Clute), [5] particularly through the insertion of lyric poetry that is sometimes rather inferior. [5]

Poul Anderson American writer

Poul William Anderson was an American science fiction author who began his career in the 1940s and continued to write into the 21st century. Anderson authored several works of fantasy, historical novels, and short stories. His awards include seven Hugo Awards and three Nebula Awards.

Selected works

Gordon Dickson c.1955 Gordon Dickson 5512.jpg
Gordon Dickson c.1955

Childe Cycle

Dragon Knight series

  1. The Dragon and the George (1976)
  2. The Dragon Knight (1990)
  3. The Dragon on the Border (1992)
  4. The Dragon at War (1992)
  5. The Dragon, the Earl, and the Troll (1994)
  6. The Dragon and the Djinn (1996)
  7. The Dragon and the Gnarly King (1997)
  8. The Dragon in Lyonesse (1998)
  9. The Dragon and the Fair Maid of Kent (2000)

Hoka series

Novels

Short story collections

Dickson's novelette "The Seats of Hell", cover-featured on the May 1959 issue of Fantastic, was collected in Beginnings Fantastic 196010.jpg
Dickson's novelette "The Seats of Hell", cover-featured on the May 1959 issue of Fantastic , was collected in Beginnings
Dickson's novelette "Home from the Shore", cover-featured on the February 1963 issue of Galaxy Science Fiction, was collected in Mutants Galaxy 196302.jpg
Dickson's novelette "Home from the Shore", cover-featured on the February 1963 issue of Galaxy Science Fiction , was collected in Mutants

Children's books

Awards

Dickson received the 1977 Skylark —Edward E. Smith Memorial Award for Imaginative Fiction from NESFA— for his contribution to SF [6] and he was inducted by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame in 2000. [1]

He won several annual literary awards for particular works. [6]

Hugo Award
Nebula Award
August Derleth Award (best novel, British Fantasy Society)

See also

Related Research Articles

Sandra Louise Miesel is an American medievalist, writer and science fiction and fantasy fan. Her early work was science fiction and fantasy criticism, fields in which she has remained active. She is a literary analyst; has described herself as "the world's greatest expert" on Poul Anderson and Gordon R. Dickson, and has written front and back matter for many of Anderson's books.

<i>The Hugo Winners</i> book by Isaac Asimov

The Hugo Winners was a series of books which collected science fiction and fantasy stories that won a Hugo Award for Short Story, Novelette or Novella at the World Science Fiction Convention between 1955 and 1982. Each volume was edited by American writer Isaac Asimov, who wrote the introduction and a short essay about each author featured in the book. Through these essays, Asimov reveals personal anecdotes, which authors he's jealous of, and how other writers winning awards ahead of him made him angry. Additionally, he discusses his political beliefs, friendships, and his affinity for writers of "hard science fiction". The first two volumes were collected by Doubleday into a single book, which lacks a publishing date and ISBN.

<i>Dorsai!</i> novel by Gordon R. Dickson

Dorsai! is the first published book of the incomplete Childe Cycle series of science fiction novels by American writer Gordon R. Dickson. Later books are set both before and after the events in Dorsai!.

The complete bibliography of Gordon R. Dickson.

<i>Ends</i> book by Gordon R. Dickson

Ends is a collection of science fiction stories and poems by American writer Gordon R. Dickson. It was first published by Baen Books in 1988 and as a companion volume to Dickson's Beginnings. Most of the stories originally appeared in the magazines Analog Science Fiction and Fact, Astounding, If, Galaxy Science Fiction, Destinies, Science Fiction Stories and Amazing Stories The poems first appeared in The Final Encyclopedia.

<i>Lost Dorsai</i> science fiction novella by Gordon R. Dickson

Lost Dorsai is a science fiction novella by American writer Gordon R. Dickson. It won the Hugo Award for Best Novella in 1981 and was also nominated for the Nebula Award in 1980.

<i>Earthmans Burden</i> book by Poul Anderson

Earthman's Burden is a collection of science fiction stories by American writers Poul Anderson and Gordon R. Dickson. It was first published by Gnome Press in 1957. The story "Don Jones" was original to this collection. The other stories originally appeared in the magazines Other Worlds, Universe and Fantasy and Science Fiction.

<i>The Spirit of Dorsai</i> book by Gordon R. Dickson

The Spirit of Dorsai is a collection of two science fiction stories by American writer Gordon R. Dickson. It was first published by Ace Books in 1979. The collection includes linking material and the stories are part of Dickson's Childe Cycle. The first story, "Amanda Morgan", is original to this collection. The other, "Brothers", originally appeared in the anthology Astounding, edited by Harry Harrison.

<i>Lost Dorsai</i> (short story collection) book by Gordon R. Dickson

Lost Dorsai is a collection of science fiction stories by Gordon R. Dickson from his Childe Cycle series. It was first published by Ace Books in 1980. The collection includes two stories that originally appeared in the anthology series Destinies, one that appeared in the magazine Analog Science Fiction and Fact and an excerpt from Dickson's novel The Final Encyclopedia.

<i>Hoka!</i> book by Poul Anderson

Hoka! is a collection of science fiction stories by American writers Poul Anderson and Gordon Dickson. It was first published by Wallaby in 1983. The stories originally appeared in the magazines Fantasy and Science Fiction and Analog Science Fiction and Fact.

<i>Dickson!</i> book by Gordon R. Dickson

Dickson! is a collection of science fiction stories by American writer Gordon R. Dickson. It was first published by NESFA Press in 1984 and was issued in honor of Dickson's appearance as guest of honor at the 42nd World Science Fiction Convention. Most of the stories originally appeared in the magazines SFWA Bulletin, Astounding, Analog Science Fiction and Fact, Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine and Science Fiction Stories. The book contains introduction to each story by Sandra Miesel.

<i>Steel Brother</i> book by Gordon R. Dickson

Steel Brother is a collection of science fiction stories by Gordon R. Dickson. It was first published by Tor Books in 1985 and reprints most of the stories from Dickson's 1984 collection Dickson!, with one substitution and one added interview. The stories originally appeared in the magazines SFWA Bulletin, Astounding, Galaxy Science Fiction, Analog Science Fiction and Fact, Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine and Science Fiction Stories. The book contains the introduction to each story by Sandra Miesel from the previous collection, though they are not credited.

<i>Beyond the Dar Al-Harb</i> book by Gordon R. Dickson

Beyond the Dar Al-Harb is a collection of three fantasy and science fiction stories by American writer Gordon R. Dickson. It was first published by Tor Books in 1985. The title story is original to this collection, and features "Red Jamie", a character from the Thieves World series previously in Dickson's collaborative novel Jamie the Red (1984). The others appeared in the magazine Worlds of Tomorrow and the anthology The Day the Sun Stood Still edited by Robert Silverberg.

<i>The Dorsai Companion</i> book by Gordon R. Dickson

The Dorsai Companion is a collection of science fiction stories by American writer Gordon R. Dickson, part of his Childe Cycle series. It was first published by Ace Books in 1986. The collection includes a number of articles by Sandra Miesel.

<i>Hoka! Hoka! Hoka!</i> book by Poul Anderson

Hoka! Hoka! Hoka! is a collection of science fiction stories by Poul Anderson and Gordon Dickson. It was first published by Baen Books in 1998 and reprints the authors' earlier collection, Earthman's Burden, expanding with two additional stories from Hoka!. The story "Don Jones" originally appeared in Earthman's Burden. The other stories originally appeared in the magazines Other Worlds, Universe and Fantasy and Science Fiction.

<i>Hokas Pokas!</i> book by Poul Anderson

Hokas Pokas! is a collection of science fiction stories, as well as the novel Star Prince Charlie, by American writer Poul Anderson and Gordon R. Dickson. It was first published by Baen Books in 2000. The stories originally appeared in the magazines Fantasy and Science Fiction and Analog Science Fiction and Fact.

Poul Anderson bibliography

The following is a list of works by science fiction and fantasy author Poul Anderson.

<i>The Many Worlds of Poul Anderson</i> book by Poul Anderson

The Many Worlds of Poul Anderson is a collection of science fiction short stories by American writer Poul Anderson, edited by Roger Elwood, first published in hardcover by Chilton in June 1974. A paperback edition retitled The Book of Poul Anderson followed from DAW Books in June 1975, and was reprinted in June 1978, December 1978, and October 1983. Most of the pieces were originally published between 1947 and 1971 in the magazines Astounding Science Fiction, The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Analog, Riverside Quarterly, and Other Worlds Science Stories. The others are original to the collection.

<i>Nebula Awards Showcase</i>

Nebula Award Showcase is a series of annual science fiction and fantasy anthologies collecting the stories that have won or been nominated for the Nebula Award, awarded by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), a nonprofit association of professional science fiction and fantasy writers founded in 1965 by Damon Knight as the Science Fiction Writers of America.

References

  1. 1 2 "Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame" Archived 2013-05-21 at the Wayback Machine . Mid American Science Fiction and Fantasy Conventions, Inc. Retrieved 2013-03-22. This was the official website of the Hall of Fame to 2004.
  2. 1 2 John Clute: Gordon R. Dickson (1923–). In: Richard Bleiler (ed.): Science Fiction Writers. Critical Studies of the Major Authors from the Early Nineteenth Century to the Present Day. Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York 1982, p. 345
  3. 1 2 Gordon R. Dickson at the Internet Speculative Fiction Database (ISFDB). Retrieved 2013-04-22. Select a title to see its linked publication history and general information. Select a particular edition (title) for more data at that level, such as a front cover image or linked contents.
  4. "Gordon R. Dickson -- Science Fiction Writer, 77". The New York Times. February 16, 2001. Retrieved April 1, 2010.
  5. 1 2 3 4 5 6 John Clute: Gordon R. Dickson (1923–). In: Richard Bleiler (ed.): Science Fiction Writers. Critical Studies of the Major Authors from the Early Nineteenth Century to the Present Day. Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York 1982, p. 346
  6. 1 2 "Dickson, Gordon R." Archived 2012-10-16 at the Wayback Machine . The Locus Index to SF Awards: Index of Literary Nominees. Locus Publications. Retrieved 2013-03-22.
Citations