Gore Pass

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Gore Pass
Elevation 2,903 m (9,524 ft)
Traversed by State Highway 134
Location Grand County, Colorado, U.S.
Range Rocky Mountains
Coordinates 40°04′33″N106°33′39″W / 40.07583°N 106.56083°W / 40.07583; -106.56083
Topo map USGS Gore Pass

Gore Pass (el. 2903 m./9527 ft.) is a high mountain pass in the Rocky Mountains of northwestern Colorado in the United States.

Mountain pass Route through a mountain range or over a ridge

A mountain pass is a navigable route through a mountain range or over a ridge. Since many of the world's mountain ranges have presented formidable barriers to travel, passes have played a key role in trade, war, and both human and animal migration throughout Earth's history. At lower elevations it may be called a hill pass. The highest vehicle-accessible pass in the world appears to be Mana Pass, located in the Himalayas on the border between India and Tibet, China.

Rocky Mountains mountain range in North America

The Rocky Mountains, also known as the Rockies, are a major mountain range in western North America. The Rocky Mountains stretch more than 4,800 kilometers (3,000 mi) from the northernmost part of British Columbia, in western Canada, to New Mexico in the Southwestern United States. Located within the North American Cordillera, the Rockies are somewhat distinct from the Pacific Coast Ranges, Cascade Range, and the Sierra Nevada, which all lie farther to the west.

Colorado State of the United States of America

Colorado is a state of the Western United States encompassing most of the southern Rocky Mountains as well as the northeastern portion of the Colorado Plateau and the western edge of the Great Plains. It is the 8th most extensive and 21st most populous U.S. state. The estimated population of Colorado was 5,695,564 on July 1, 2018, an increase of 13.25% since the 2010 United States Census.

The pass crosses a gap in the northern end of the Gore Range in southwestern Grand County west of Kremmling. The pass provides the route of State Highway 134 east of Toponas, furnishing a motor vehicle route between Middle Park and the valley of the Yampa River to the west. It has a mild approach to the west, while the east side has a moderate 5.4% grade.

Grand County, Colorado County in the United States

Grand County is one of the 64 counties in the U.S. state of Colorado. As of the 2010 census, the population was 14,843. The county seat is Hot Sulphur Springs.

Kremmling, Colorado Statutory Town in Colorado, United States

The Town of Kremmling is a Statutory Town in Grand County, Colorado, United States. The town population was 1444 at the 2010 United States Census. The town sits along the upper Colorado River in the lower arid section of Middle Park between Byers Canyon and Gore Canyon. The town was founded in 1881 during the Colorado Silver Boom days, but the lack of mineral resources in the nearby mountains made the town grow very slowly in the early days.

Gore Pass is named for Sir St. George Gore, an Irish baronet from Sligo whose sole purpose was to break records and fill his trophy room. In 1975, there was a sign on Colorado State Road Hwy 84 which read "GORE PASS, Altitude 9,000 feet. Here in 1855 crossed Sir St. George Gore, an Irish baronet bent on the slaughter of game and guided by Jim Bridger. For three years he scoured Colorado, Montana, and Wyoming, accompanied usually by fort men, many carts, wagons, hounds, and unexampled camp luxuries. More than 2,000 buffalo, 1,600 deer and elk, and 100 bears were massacred for sport." Readers are referred to pages 305-312 of the book, "The Trail of Tears (The Story of the American Indian Removals 1813-1855" by Gloria Jahoda, 1975. [1]

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In the American Old West, overland trails were popular means of travel used by pioneers and immigrants throughout the 19th century and especially between 1830 and 1870 as an alternative to sea and railroad transport. These immigrants began to settle various regions of North America west of the Great Plains as part of the mass overland migrations of the mid-19th century. Settlers emigrating from the eastern United States were spurred by various motives, among them religious persecution, economic incentives, some people say that the interior to destinations in the far west, including the Oregon Trail, California Trail, and Mormon Trail. After the end of the Mexican–American War in 1849, vast new American conquests again enticed mass immigration. Legislation like the Donation Land Claim Act and significant events like the California Gold Rush further lured people to travel overland to the west.

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References

  1. "The Trail of Tears (The Story of the American Indian Removals 1813-1855" by Gloria Jahoda, 1975