Gore Range

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Gore Range
Lake Dillon, in Colorado, in October 2011.jpg
The southern end of the Gore Range seen from Dillon Reservoir.
Highest point
Peak Mount Powell
Elevation 13,566 ft (4,135 m)
Coordinates 39°45′36″N106°20′27″W / 39.76000°N 106.34083°W / 39.76000; -106.34083 Coordinates: 39°45′36″N106°20′27″W / 39.76000°N 106.34083°W / 39.76000; -106.34083
Dimensions
Length77 mi (124 km)N-S
Width46 mi (74 km)E-W
Area1,420 sq mi (3,700 km2)
Geography
CountryUnited States
StateColorado
County Eagle, Summit, Grand and Routt
Parent range Southern Rocky Mountains

The Gore Range (elevation approximately 12,000 ft) is a mountain range in the Rocky Mountains of north central Colorado in the United States.

Contents

Geography

The range runs for approximately 60 miles (100 km) northwest-to-southeast, through western Grand and Summit counties, and eastern Routt and Eagle counties. They form the southern extension of the Park Range, extending southward from Rabbit Ears Pass (U.S. Highway 40) to the Eagle River near Vail. The Colorado River passes through the range at Gore Canyon. The range forms part of the western boundary of Middle Park at the headwaters of the Colorado, separating it from the upper basin of the Yampa River to the west. The northern section of the range north of Gore Pass is somewhat lower than the southern section, along the western side of the valley of the Blue River. The ridges of the range are prominently visible on clear days from the summit of Trail Ridge Road in Rocky Mountain National Park approximately 50 miles (80 km) to the east. The range is traversed at its southern and southwestern lower flanks by Interstate 70 from Silverthorne to Vail. Much of the range is located within the Arapaho and White River National Forests, and large portions are protected within the Eagles Nest Wilderness.

History

The range was named for Lord St. George Gore, an Irish baronet who visited the area in the 1850s on a notorious hunting expedition throughout the American West.

Gore's three-year stopover in the American West had him traversing what is today the Dakotas, Montana, Wyoming and Colorado. The figures are difficult to substantiate, but Gore himself claimed to have killed more than 2,000 buffalo, 1,600 elk and deer and 100 bears for mere sport. The carcasses were left to rot. [1]

Gore Range from Vail Mountain.jpg
The Gore Range as seen from Vail, Colorado.
Gore Range, Colorado.jpg
The Gore Range as seen from Ptarmigan Peak Trail

See also

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Mount Powell is the highest summit of the Gore Range in the Rocky Mountains of North America. The prominent 13,586-foot (4,141 m) thirteener is located in the Eagles Nest Wilderness, 8.5 miles (13.7 km) north by east of the Town of Vail, Colorado, United States, along the drainage divide separating White River National Forest and Eagle County from Arapaho National Forest and Summit County. Mount Powell was named in honor of John Wesley Powell who climbed to the summit in 1868.

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References

  1. "Colorado's Gore Range was named after a bloodthirsty 19th century aristocrat. Is it time for a change?" . Retrieved 2018-09-01.