Gottfried Ludolf Camphausen

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Ludolf Camphausen

Gottfried Ludolf Camphausen (January 10 1803 in Geilenkirchen - December 3 1890 in Cologne) was a Prime Minister of Prussia.

January 10 is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 355 days remaining until the end of the year.

1803 Year

1803 (MDCCCIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1803rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 803rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 3rd year of the 19th century, and the 4th year of the 1800s decade. As of the start of 1803, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Geilenkirchen Place in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany

Geilenkirchen is a town in the district Heinsberg, in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. It is situated near the border with the Netherlands, on the river Wurm, approx. 15 km north-east of Heerlen and 20 km north of Aachen.

Life

During the Revolutions of 1848 in Germany, Ludolf Camphausen stepped suddenly from his banker's desk at Cologne to the presidential chair of the Ministry of State at Berlin, being called by King Frederick William IV of Prussia to succeed Count Arnim-Boitzenburg as prime minister, on 29 March. Ludolf availed himself largely of his younger brother's (Otto) proven business talents, and the two might have succeeded had they not to encounter the insincerity of the monarch on the one side, and the distrust of the Radical and Progressist majority of the Assembly on the other side.

Cologne Place in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany

Cologne is the largest city of Germany's most populous federal state of North Rhine-Westphalia, and its 1 million+ (2016) inhabitants make it the fourth most populous city in Germany after Berlin, Hamburg, and Munich. The largest city on the Rhine, it is also the most populous city both of the Rhine-Ruhr Metropolitan Region, which is Germany's largest and one of Europe's major metropolitan areas, and of the Rhineland. Centred on the left bank of the Rhine, Cologne is about 45 kilometres (28 mi) southeast of North Rhine-Westphalia's capital of Düsseldorf and 25 kilometres (16 mi) northwest of Bonn. It is the largest city in the Central Franconian and Ripuarian dialect areas.

Frederick William IV of Prussia King of Prussia

Frederick William IV, the eldest son and successor of Frederick William III of Prussia, reigned as King of Prussia from 1840 to 1861. Also referred to as the "romanticist on the throne", he is best remembered for the many buildings he had constructed in Berlin and Potsdam, as well as for the completion of the Gothic Cologne Cathedral. In politics, he was a conservative, and in 1849 rejected the title of Emperor of the Germans offered by the Frankfurt Parliament as not the Parliament's to give. In 1857, he suffered a stroke and was left incapacitated until his death. His brother Wilhelm served as regent for the rest of his reign and then succeeded him as King.

Adolf Heinrich von Arnim-Boitzenburg German politician

Adolf Heinrich Graf von Arnim-Boitzenburg was a German statesman. He served as the first Minister President of Prussia for ten days during the Revolution of 1848.

Both Ludolf and Otto Camphausen were moderate Liberals too Liberal to suit the views of the king and of the reactionary feudalist clique around him, and too Conservative for the impatience of the men of progress. Less than three months sufficed to convince Ludolf Camphausen of this fact, and already on 20 June he tendered his resignation to the king.

One month later Camphausen was sent as Prussian representative to the Frankfurt Parliament. Here he remained intil April, 1849, when he finally resigned, and went back to his banking business at Cologne, thoroughly disenchanted of the alluring illusions of power and office.

Frankfurt Parliament first parliament for all of Germany (1849-1849)

The Frankfurt Parliament was the first freely elected parliament for all of Germany, elected on 1 May 1848.

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